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Profile: Chaim Gans (Tel Aviv University)
  1. Andreas Føllesdal, Joel Perlmann, Bashir Bashir, Raphael Cohen-Almagor, Said Zeedani & Chaim Gans (2011). Reactions & Debate. Ethical Perspectives 18 (4):625-681.
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  2. Chaim Gans (2011). A Just Zionism: On the Morality of the Jewish State. OUP USA.
    The legitimacy of the Zionist project--establishing a Jewish homeland in Palestine--has been questioned since its inception. In recent years, the voices challenging the legitimacy of the State of Israel have become even louder. Chaim Gans examines these doubts and presents an in-depth, evenhanded philosophical analysis of the justice of Zionism. -/- Today, alongside a violent Middle East where many refuse to accept Israel's existence, there are two academically respectable arguments for the injustice of Zionism. One claim is that the very (...)
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  3. Chaim Gans (2008). Nationalist Priorities and Restrictions in Immigration: The Case of Israel. Law and Ethics of Human Rights 2 (1):1-19.
  4. Chaim Gans (2007). Individuals' Interest in the Preservation of Their Culture. Law and Ethics of Human Rights 1 (1):6-16.
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  5. Chaim Gans (2001). Historical Rights: The Evaluation of Nationalist Claims to Sovereignty. Political Theory 29 (1):58-79.
  6. Chaim Gans (2000). The Liberal Foundations of Cultural Nationalism. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 30 (3):441-466.
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  7. Chaim Gans (1998). Nationalism and Immigration. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 1 (2):159-180.
    Can states' immigration policies favor groups with whom they are culturally and historically tied? I shall answer this question here positively, but in a qualified manner. My arguments in support of this answer will be of distributive justice, presupposing a globalist rather than a localist approach to justice. They will be based on a version of liberal nationalism according to which individuals can have fundamental interests in their national culture, interests which are rooted in freedom, identity, and especially in ensuring (...)
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  8. Chaim Gans (1992). Philosophical Anarchism and Political Disobedience. Cambridge University Press.
    This book examines the central questions concerning the duty to obey the law: the meaning of this duty; whether and where it should be acknowledged; and whether and when it should be disregarded. Many contemporary philosophers deny the very existence of this duty, but take a cautious stance toward political disobedience. This 'toothless anarchism', Professor Gans argues, should be discarded in favour of a converse position confirming the existence of a duty to obey the law which can be outweighed by (...)
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  9. Chaim Gans (1988). Justice-Conditioned and Democracy Based Obedience. Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 8 (1):92-110.
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  10. Chaim Gans (1986). Mandatory Rules and Exclusionary Reasons. Philosophia 15 (4):373-394.
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