Search results for 'Chandler-Ullmann Hall' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Robert L. Campbell, Mark H. Bickhard, PO Box & Chandler-Ullmann Hall, Types of Constraints on Development: An Interactivist Approach.score: 870.0
    The interactivist approach to development generates a framework of types of constraints on what can be constructed. The four constraint types are based on: (1) what the constructed systems are about; (2) the representational relationship itself; (3) the nature of the systems being constructed; and (4) the process of construction itself. We give illustrations of each constraint type. Any developmental theory needs to acknowledge all four types of constraint; however, some current theories conflate different types of constraint, or rely on (...)
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  2. Everett W. Hall (1958). Hochberg on What is `Fitting' for Ewing and Hall. Mind 67 (265):104-106.score: 180.0
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  3. J. R. Hall (2010). Thomas N. Hall and Donald Scragg, Eds., Anglo-Saxon Books and Their Readers: Essays in Celebration of Helmut Gneuss's “Handlist of Anglo-Saxon Manuscripts.” (Publications of the Richard Rawlinson Center.) Kalamazoo, Mich.: Medieval Institute Publications, Western Michigan University, 2008. Paper. Pp. Xvi, 181; Black-and-White Figures and Tables. [REVIEW] Speculum 85 (3):680-682.score: 180.0
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  4. Brian Meeks & Stuart Hall (eds.) (2007). Culture, Politics, Race and Diaspora: The Thought of Stuart Hall. Lawrence & Wishart.score: 180.0
  5. Cheryl Ann Hall (2007). Recognizing the Passion in Deliberation: Toward a More Democratic Theory of Deliberative Democracy. Hypatia 22 (4):81-95.score: 60.0
    : Critics have suggested that deliberative democracy reproduces inequalities of gender, race, and class by privileging calm rational discussion over passionate speech and action. Their solution is to supplement deliberation with such forms of emotional expression. Hall argues that deliberation already inherently involves passion, a point that is especially important to recognize in order to deconstruct the dichotomy between reason and passion that plays a central role in reinforcing inequalities of gender, race, and class in the first place.
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  6. Brian K. Hall (2012). Lamarck, Lamarckism, Epigenetics and Epigenetic Inheritance. Metascience 21 (2):375-378.score: 60.0
    Lamarck, Lamarckism, epigenetics and epigenetic inheritance Content Type Journal Article Category Book Review Pages 1-4 DOI 10.1007/s11016-012-9661-6 Authors Brian K. Hall, Department of Biology, Dalhousie University, 1355 Oxford Street, Halifax, NS B3H 4J1, Canada Journal Metascience Online ISSN 1467-9981 Print ISSN 0815-0796.
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  7. Adrian Carter & Wayne Hall (2007). The Social Implications of Neurobiological Explanations of Resistible Compulsions. American Journal of Bioethics 7 (1):15 – 17.score: 60.0
    The authors comments on several articles on addiction. Research suggests that addicted individuals have substantial impairments in cognitive control of behavior. The authors maintain that a proper study of addiction must include a neurobiological model of addiction to draw the attention of bioethicists and addiction neurobiologists. They also state that more addiction neuroscientists like S. E. Hyman are needed as they understand the limits of their research. Accession Number: 24077921; Authors: Carter, Adrian 1; Email Address: adrian.carter@uq.edu.au Hall, Wayne 1; (...)
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  8. Ronald L. Hall (2011). Editorial Preface Vol. 70.2. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 70 (2):107-108.score: 60.0
    Editorial preface vol. 70.2 Content Type Journal Article Category Editorial Pages 1-2 DOI 10.1007/s11153-011-9321-6 Authors Ronald L. Hall, Department of Philosophy, Stetson University, DeLand, FL, USA Journal International Journal for Philosophy of Religion Online ISSN 1572-8684 Print ISSN 0020-7047.
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  9. Geoffrey Chandler (1998). Oil Companies and Human Rights. Business Ethics 7 (2):69–72.score: 60.0
    The chairman of Amnesty International’s UK Business Group considers how oil companies must change their attitudes in a world which is changing faster. “Silence or inaction will be seen to provide comfort to oppression and may be adjudged complicity.” Sir Geoffrey Chandler CBE is a former senior executive of the Royal/Dutch Shell Group and architect of Shell’s first Statement of General Business Principles. This article is reprinted with permission from Oxford Energy Forum, November 1, 1997.
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  10. Jerome Hall (1949/1982). Living Law of Democratic Society. F.B. Rothman.score: 60.0
    Hall discusses the ideas of modern day legal philosophers such as Duguit, Geny, Ehrlich, & Kelsen, & what their conceptions mean to a democratic society.
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  11. Mark A. Hall (1997). Making Medical Spending Decisions: The Law, Ethics, and Economics of Rationing Mechanisms. Oxford University Press.score: 60.0
    This book explores the making of health care rationing decisions through the analysis of three alternative decision makers: patients paying out of pocket; officials setting limits on treatments and coverage; and physicians at the bedside. Hall develops this analysis along three dimensions: political economics, ethics, and law. The economic dimension addresses the practical feasibility of each method. The ethical dimension discusses the moral aspects of these methods, while the legal dimension traces the most recent developments in jurisprudence and health (...)
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  12. Gerard V. Hall (2011). Australian Catholicism and Interfaith Dialogue. Australasian Catholic Record, The 88 (3):296.score: 60.0
    Hall, Gerard V The term interfaith dialogue may be relatively new and, in the minds of some, not the best term to describe the positive interaction between people of various religious, spiritual and cultural traditions. However, rather than get ourselves hijacked over the best choice of words, we need to acknowledge some fundamental realities. The first is that cultures, societies and religions have evolved in relationship with - and, too often, conflict between - one another. The second is that, (...)
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  13. Daniele Archibugi & David Chandler (2009). A Dialogue on International Interventions: When Are They a Right or an Obligation? Ethics and Global Politics 2 (2).score: 60.0
    Edited by Nieves Zúñiga García-Falces. In 15 years, the international community has been blamed for resorting too easily to the use of force on some occasions (Iraq, Afghanistan, Kosovo), and also it has been blamed for intervening too late or not at all in other crises (Rwanda, Bosnia and today Sudan and Congo). Even today, one of the most contested questions of international politics is the legitimacy for the use of force. David Chandler, Professor of International Relations at the University (...)
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  14. James K. Chandler, Arnold Ira Davidson & Harry D. Harootunian (eds.) (1994). Questions of Evidence: Proof, Practice, and Persuasion Across the Disciplines. University of Chicago Press.score: 60.0
    Biologists, historians, lawyers, art historians, and literary critics all voice arguments in the critical dialogue about what constitutes evidence in research and scholarship. They examine not only the constitution and "blurring" of disciplinary boundaries, but also the configuration of the fact-evidence distinctions made in different disciplines and historical moments the relative function of such concepts as "self-evidence," "experience," "test," "testimony," and "textuality" in varied academic discourses and the way "rules of evidence" are themselves products of historical developments. The essays and (...)
     
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  15. Bryan Hall (2014). The Post-Critical Kant: Understanding the Critical Philosophy Through the Opus Postumum. Routledge.score: 60.0
    In this book, Bryan Wesley Hall breaks new ground in Kant scholarship, exploring the gap in Kant’s Critical philosophy in relation to his post-Critical work by turning to Kant’s final, unpublished work, the so-called Opus Postumum. Although Kant considered this project to be the "keystone" of his philosophical efforts, it has been largely neglected by scholars. Hall argues that only by understanding the Opus Postumum can we fully comprehend both Kant’s mature view as well as his Critical project. (...)
     
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  16. Roger T. Ames & David L. Hall (2003). Dao De Jing: Making This Life Significant: A Philosophical Translation. Ballantine Books.score: 60.0
    Composed more than 2,000 years ago during a turbulent period of Chinese history, the Dao de jing set forth an alternative vision of reality in a world torn apart by violence and betrayal. Daoism, as this subtle but enduring philosophy came to be known, offers a comprehensive view of experience grounded in a full understanding of the wonders hidden in the ordinary. Now in this luminous new translation, based on the recently discovered ancient bamboo scrolls, China scholars Roger T. Ames (...)
     
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  17. Ronnie Littlejohn & Marthe Chandler (eds.) (2008). Polishing the Chinese Mirror: Essays in Honor of Henry Rosemont, Jr. Global Scholarly Publications.score: 60.0
    Edited by Marthe Chandler and Ronnie Littlejohn, this work is a collection of expository and critical essays on the work of Henry Rosemont, Jr., a prominent and influential contemporary philosopher, activist, translator, and educator in the field of Asian and Comparative Philosophy. The essays in this collection take up three major themes in Rosemont's work: his work in Chinese linguistics, his contribution to the theory of human rights, and his interest in East Asian religion. Contributions include works by the leading (...)
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  18. L. A. Paul & Ned Hall (2013). Causation: A User's Guide. Oxford.score: 60.0
    Causation is at once familiar and mysterious--we can detect its presence in the world, but we cannot agree on the metaphysics of the causal relation. L. A. Paul and Ned Hall guide the reader through the most important philosophical treatments of causation, and develop a broad and sophisticated understanding of the issues under debate.
     
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  19. Ned Hall, Humean Reductionism About Laws of Nature.score: 30.0
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  20. Hugh S. Chandler, Parfit on Division.score: 30.0
    Parfit’s well known book, Reasons and Persons, argues, among other things, that ‘what matters’ in regard to ‘survival’ is not personal identity but something he calls ‘relation R.’ On this basis, plus other considerations, he rejects the ‘Self-interest’ theory as to what should be our aim in life. Here I show, or try to show, that his over-all argument is seriously defective. In particular, he fails to prove that personal identity is not what matters for survival.
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  21. Petter Johansson, Lars Hall, Sverker Sikstrom & Andreas Olsson (2005). Failure to Detect Mismatches Between Intention and Outcome in a Simple Decision Task. Science 310:116-119.score: 30.0
    A fundamental assumption of theories of decision-making is that we detect mismatches between intention and outcome, adjust our behavior in the face of error, and adapt to changing circumstances. Is this always the case? We investigated the relation between intention, choice, and introspection. Participants made choices between presented face pairs on the basis of attractiveness, while we covertly manipulated the relationship between choice and outcome that they experienced. Participants failed to notice conspicuous mismatches between their intended choice and the outcome (...)
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  22. John Collins, Ned Hall & L. A. Paul (2004). Counterfactuals and Causation: History, Problems, and Prospects. In John Collins, Ned Hall & Laurie Paul (eds.), Causation and Counterfactuals. The Mit Press. 1--57.score: 30.0
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  23. Alex Byrne & N. Hall (1999). Chalmers on Consciousness and Quantum Mechanics. Philosophy of Science 66 (3):370-90.score: 30.0
    The textbook presentation of quantum mechanics, in a nutshell, is this. The physical state of any isolated system evolves deterministically in accordance with Schrödinger's equation until a "measurement" of some physical magnitude M (e.g. position, energy, spin) is made. Restricting attention to the case where the values of M are discrete, the system's pre-measurement state-vector f is a linear combination, or "superposition", of vectors f1, f2,... that individually represent states that..
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  24. Ned Hall (2004). Two Mistakes About Credence and Chance. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 82 (1):93 – 111.score: 30.0
    David Lewis's influential work on the epistemology and metaphysics of objective chance has convinced many philosophers of the central importance of the following two claims: First, it is a serious cost of reductionist positions about chance (such as that occupied by Lewis) that they are, apparently, forced to modify the Principal Principle--the central principle relating objective chance to rational subjective probability--in order to avoid contradiction. Second, it is a perhaps more serious cost of the rival non-reductionist position that, unlike reductionism, (...)
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  25. Frank Arntzenius & Ned Hall (2003). On What We Know About Chance. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 54 (2):171-179.score: 30.0
    The ‘Principal Principle’ states, roughly, that one's subjective probability for a proposition should conform to one's beliefs about that proposition's objective chance of coming true. David Lewis has argued (i) that this principle provides the defining role for chance; (ii) that it conflicts with his reductionist thesis of Humean supervenience, and so must be replaced by an amended version that avoids the conflict; hence (iii) that nothing perfectly deserves the name ‘chance’, although something can come close enough by playing the (...)
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  26. Hugh S. Chandler, How Many Minds?score: 30.0
    In Analysis, Vol. 45, June 1984, George Rea published a paper attacking my claim that there could be ‘indeterminate minds'. This paper is a reply to his attack. I claim, again, that such ‘minds’ are possible – entities such that it is indeterminate whether or not these entities are people with minds. -/- .
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  27. Branden Fitelson, Alan Hajek & Ned Hall (2006). Probability. In Jessica Pfeifer & Sahotra Sarkar (eds.), The Philosophy of Science: An Encyclopedia. Routledge.score: 30.0
    There are two central questions concerning probability. First, what are its formal features? That is a mathematical question, to which there is a standard, widely (though not universally) agreed upon answer. This answer is reviewed in the next section. Second, what sorts of things are probabilities---what, that is, is the subject matter of probability theory? This is a philosophical question, and while the mathematical theory of probability certainly bears on it, the answer must come from elsewhere. To see why, observe (...)
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  28. Ned Hall (2006). Philosophy of Causation: Blind Alleys Exposed; Promising Directions Highlighted. Philosophy Compass 1 (1):86–94.score: 30.0
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  29. Ned Hall (1994). Correcting the Guide to Objective Chance. Mind 103 (412):505-518.score: 30.0
  30. Ned Hall (2004). Rescued From the Rubbish Bin: Lewis on Causation. Philosophy of Science 71 (5):1107-1114.score: 30.0
    Lewis's work on causation was governed by a familiar methodological approach: the aim was to come up with an account of causation that would recover, in as elegant a fashion as possible, all of our firm “pre‐theoretic” intuitions about hypothetical cases. That methodology faces an obvious challenge, in that it is not clear why anyone not interested in the semantics of the English word “cause” should care about its results. Better to take a different approach, one which treats our intuitions (...)
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  31. Hugh S. Chandler (1975). Rigid Designation. Journal of Philosophy 72 (13):363-369.score: 30.0
    I have been told that for some twenty minutes after reading this paper Kripke believed I had shown that proper names could be non-rigid designators. (Then, apparently, he found a crucial error in the set-up.) I take great pride in this (alleged) fact.
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  32. Ned Hall (2000). Causation and the Price of Transitivity. Journal of Philosophy 97 (4):198-222.score: 30.0
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  33. John Collins, Ned Hall & Laurie Paul (eds.) (2004). Causation and Counterfactuals. The Mit Press.score: 30.0
    Thirty years after Lewis's paper, this book brings together some of the most important recent work connecting—or, in some cases, disputing the connection ...
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  34. Ned Hall (2002). Non-Locality on the Cheap? A New Problem for Counterfactual Analyses of Causation. Noûs 36 (2):276–294.score: 30.0
  35. Ned Hall (2001). Ontology of Mind. Helen Steward. Mind 110 (440):1123-1127.score: 30.0
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  36. Alison Hall (2008). Free Enrichment or Hidden Indexicals? Mind and Language 23 (4):426-456.score: 30.0
    Abstract: A current debate in semantics and pragmatics is whether all contextual effects on truth-conditional content can be traced to logical form, or 'unarticulated constituents' can be supplied by the pragmatic process of free enrichment. In this paper, I defend the latter position. The main objection to this view is that free enrichment appears to overgenerate, not predicting where context cannot affect truth conditions, so that a systematic account is unlikely (Stanley, 2002a). I first examine the semantic alternative proposed by (...)
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  37. N. Hall (2007). Structural Equations and Causation. Philosophical Studies 132 (1):109 - 136.score: 30.0
    Structural equations have become increasingly popular in recent years as tools for understanding causation. But standard structural equations approaches to causation face deep problems. The most philosophically interesting of these consists in their failure to incorporate a distinction between default states of an object or system, and deviations therefrom. Exploring this problem, and how to fix it, helps to illuminate the central role this distinction plays in our causal thinking.
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  38. Ronald L. Hall (1989). Hell, is This Really Necessary? International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 25 (2):109 - 116.score: 30.0
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  39. Richard J. Hall (2008). If It Itches, Scratch! Australasian Journal of Philosophy 86 (4):525 – 535.score: 30.0
    Many bodily sensations are connected quite closely with specific actions: itches with scratching, for example, and hunger with eating. Indeed, these connections have the feel of conceptual connections. With the exception of D. M. Armstrong, philosophers have largely neglected this aspect of bodily sensations. In this paper, I propose a theory of bodily sensations that explains these connections. The theory ascribes intentional content to bodily sensations but not, strictly speaking, representational content. Rather, the content of these sensations is an imperative: (...)
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  40. Harrison Hall (1984). Love, and Death: Kierkegaard and Heidegger on Authentic and Inauthentic Human Existence. Inquiry 27 (1-4):179 – 197.score: 30.0
    Several commentators on Kierkegaard and Heidegger have noted the similarity between Heidegger's account of authentic temporality in Being and Time and Kierkegaard's discussion of time in The Concept of Dread. By drawing attention to a not very well known essay of Kierkegaard's, ?The Decisiveness of Death?, I attempt to show that there is a very close connection between Heidegger's and Kierkegaard's entire views on authentic human existence. In the second part I try to locate in The Present Age, not just (...)
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  41. A. Rupert Hall (1995). A. C. Crombie Styles of Scientific Thinking in the European Tradition. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 3 (2):409 – 419.score: 30.0
    Tharae history of argument and explanation especially in the mathematical and biomedical sciences and arts. 3 vols. 2456 pp., ills. Duckworth, London, 1994, £180 ISBN 0?7156?2439?3.
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  42. Ned Hall & Laurie Ann Paul (2003). Causation and Preemption. In Peter Clark & Katherine Hawley (eds.), Philosophy of Science Today. Oxford University Press.score: 30.0
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  43. David L. Hall (1978). Process and Anarchy: A Taoist Vision of Creativity. Philosophy East and West 28 (3):271-285.score: 30.0
  44. Jake Chandler (2010). The Transmission of Support: A Bayesian Re-Analysis. [REVIEW] Synthese 176 (3):333 - 343.score: 30.0
    Crispin Wright’s discussion of the notion of ‘transmission-failure’ promises to have important philosophical ramifications, both in epistemology and beyond. This paper offers a precise, formal characterisation of the concept within a Bayesian framework. The interpretation given avoids the serious shortcomings of a recent alternative proposal due to Samir Okasha.
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  45. Hugh S. Chandler (1967). Excluded Middle. Journal of Philosophy 64 (24):807-814.score: 30.0
    This is a paper on borderline cases and the law of Excluded Middle. In it I try to make use of some long forgotten, but perhaps valuable, work on the topic – a bit of Hegel for instance.
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  46. Pamela M. Hall (2008). Virtue Ethics Old and New (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 46 (2):pp. 332-332.score: 30.0
  47. Everett W. Hall (1949). The "Proof" of Utility in Bentham and Mill. Ethics 60 (1):1-18.score: 30.0
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  48. Steven Hall (2008). Review of Stephen Mulhall, Wittgenstein's Private Language: Grammar, Nonsense, and Imagination in Philosophical Investigations §§243–315. [REVIEW] Philosophical Investigations 31 (3):272–280.score: 30.0
  49. Daniel Steel & S. Kedzie Hall (2011). What If the Principle of Induction Is Normative? Formal Learning Theory and Hume's Problem. International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 24 (2):171-185.score: 30.0
    This article argues that a successful answer to Hume's problem of induction can be developed from a sub-genre of philosophy of science known as formal learning theory. One of the central concepts of formal learning theory is logical reliability: roughly, a method is logically reliable when it is assured of eventually settling on the truth for every sequence of data that is possible given what we know. I show that the principle of induction (PI) is necessary and sufficient for logical (...)
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