Search results for 'Change (Psychology' (try it on Scholar)

545 found
Order:
  1.  12
    Eunice McCarthy (2013). The Dynamics of Culture, Innovation and Organisational Change: A Nano-Psychology Future Perspective of the Psycho-Social and Cultural Underpinnings of Innovation and Technology. AI and Society 28 (4):471-482.
    This article addresses salient conceptual issues in social organisational psychology in probing change in organisational systems, e.g., culture, innovation and implementation, reflective practice and change models. Insights from chaos–complexity research in the natural sciences which underpin the dynamics of flux and change to unravel the hidden, the unexplained, the disordered will be built on to explore the phenomena of change from a social psychological perspective. The concept of nano-psychology is introduced to open up a creative debate (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  2. G. Fairbairn (1987). Introduction: Psychology, Ethics, and Change. In Susan Fairbairn & Gavin Fairbairn (eds.), Psychology, Ethics, and Change. Routledge & Kegan Paul
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  3. Susan Fairbairn & Gavin Fairbairn (eds.) (1987). Psychology, Ethics, and Change. Routledge & Kegan Paul.
  4.  8
    Christian A. Klöckner, Silke Leismann & Sunita Prugsamatz (2012). Psychology and Climate Change. In Walter Leal Filho Evangelos Manolas (ed.), English Through Climate Change. Democritus University of Thrace 13.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  5. Pieter J. Van Strien (1991). Transforming Psychology in the Netherlands II: Audiences, Alliances and the Dynamics of Change. History of the Human Sciences 4 (3):351-369.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  6.  4
    Sophie Haroutunian-Gordon (1988). Explaining Change in Psychology: The Road Not Taken. [REVIEW] Human Studies 11 (4):389 - 418.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  7.  5
    Kevin Elliott & A. I. Sabra (2000). Ment Inquiry, Industrial and Corporate Change, Journal of Economic Psychology, Journal of Management and Governance, and Journal of Economic Behavior and Organization. She is Currently Editing (with James G. March) a Book in Honor of Herbert A. Simon's Contributions, Forthcoming with MIT Press. [REVIEW] Perspectives on Science 8 (4).
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  8.  3
    James T. Townsend (1991). Modeling Change in Biology and Psychology. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (1):108.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  9.  3
    Amedeo Giorgi (forthcoming). Psychology and the Problem of Change. Humanitas.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  10.  1
    Thomas J. Shuell (1987). Cognitive Psychology and Conceptual Change: Implications for Teaching Science. Science Education 71 (2):239-250.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  11.  9
    Marc H. Bornstein (1984). Developmental Psychology and the Problem of Artistic Change. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 43 (2):131-145.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  12.  1
    A. Wolfe (1992). Book Reviews : Richard Wilson, Labyrinth: An Essay on the Political Psychology of Change. Sharpe, Armonk, NY, 1988. Pp. 223, $32.50. [REVIEW] Philosophy of the Social Sciences 22 (2):265-266.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  13.  2
    L. Shoben (1988). Psychology, Ethics and Change. Journal of Medical Ethics 14 (4):214-214.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  14. Christopher MacKenna (2004). Conscious Change and Changing Consciousness: Some Thoughts on the Psychology of Meditation. British Journal of Psychotherapy 21 (1):103-118.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  15. J. Wisdom (1945). PICKFORD, R. W. -The Psychology of Cultural Change in Painting. [REVIEW] Mind 54:281.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  16.  27
    Gale M. Sinatra & Paul R. Pintrich (eds.) (2003). Intentional Conceptual Change. L. Erlbaum.
    This volume brings together a distinguished, international list of scholars to explore the role of the learner's intention in knowledge change. Traditional views of knowledge reconstruction placed the impetus for thought change outside the learner's control. The teacher, instructional methods, materials, and activities were identified as the seat of change. Recent perspectives on learning, however, suggest that the learner can play an active, indeed, intentional role in the process of knowledge restructuring. This volume explores this new, innovative (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  17. Masaharu Mizumoto (2011). A Theory of Knowledge and Belief Change - Formal and Experimental Perspectives. Hokkaido University Press.
    This work explores the conceptual and empirical issues of the concept of knowledge and its relation to the pattern of our belief change, from formal and experimental perspectives. Part I gives an analysis of knowledge (called Sustainability) that is formally represented and naturalistically plausible at the same time, which is claimed to be a synthesized view of knowledge, covering not only empirical knowledge, but also knowledge of future, practical knowledge, mathematical knowledge, knowledge of general facts. Part II tries to (...)
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  18.  9
    Michael Andrew Ranney & Dav Clark (2016). Climate Change Conceptual Change: Scientific Information Can Transform Attitudes. Topics in Cognitive Science 8 (1):49-75.
    Of this article's seven experiments, the first five demonstrate that virtually no Americans know the basic global warming mechanism. Fortunately, Experiments 2–5 found that 2–45 min of physical–chemical climate instruction durably increased such understandings. This mechanistic learning, or merely receiving seven highly germane statistical facts, also increased climate-change acceptance—across the liberal-conservative spectrum. However, Experiment 7's misleading statistics decreased such acceptance. These readily available attitudinal and conceptual changes through scientific information disconfirm what we term “stasis theory”—which some researchers and many (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  19. Michael St Clair (2011). So Much, so Fast, so Little Time: Coming to Terms with Rapid Change and its Consequences. Praeger.
    Introduction and acknowledgments -- What is happening to us? and why? -- So much information is changing how we think -- Communication, entertainment, and over-stimulation -- Work : how it changes and how it changes us -- New behaviors and changes in manners -- Faster and faster time -- Families, women, and sex -- Making sense of contradictory social trends -- Conclusion.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  20. Michael D. Doan (2014). Climate Change and Complacency. Hypatia 29 (3):634-650.
    In this paper I engage interdisciplinary conversation on inaction as the dominant response to climate change, and develop an analysis of the specific phenomenon of complacency through a critical-feminist lens. I suggest that Chris Cuomo's discussion of the “insufficiency” problem and Susan Sherwin's call for a “public ethics” jointly point toward particularly promising harm-reduction strategies. I draw upon and extend their work by arguing that extant philosophical accounts of complacency are inadequate to the task of sorting out what (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  21.  11
    Stephan Lewandowsky (2016). Future Global Change and Cognition. Topics in Cognitive Science 8 (1):7-18.
    The 11 articles in this issue explore how people respond to climate change and other global challenges. The articles pursue three broad strands of enquiry that relate to the effects and causes of “skepticism” about climate change, the purely cognitive challenges that are posed by a complex scientific issue, and the ways in which climate change can be communicated to a wider audience. Cognitive science can contribute to understanding people's responses to global challenges in many ways, and (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  22. Lori Jespersen (2010). From This Day On: Preserving Newfound Insight, Change & Growth in the Real-World. Devorss Publications.
    The millennial vision quest -- Who are the changers? -- The great name debate -- How to read this book -- Magicians, manipulators, and muses -- The trouble with generalization -- History speaks -- The world of men and everyday affairs -- First things first -- Coming to your senses -- Hearing -- Smell -- Taste -- Sight -- Touch -- Emotion -- What to do with all of this information -- Activities -- Allies -- The importance of support -- (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  23.  3
    Takahiko Masuda & Richard E. Nisbett (2006). Culture and Change Blindness. Cognitive Science 30 (2):381-399.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   9 citations  
  24.  89
    Ned Block (1989). Can the Mind Change the World? In George S. Boolos (ed.), Meaning and Method: Essays in Honor of Hilary Putnam. Cambridge University Press 137--170.
  25.  83
    Jonathan Webber (2011). Climate Change and Public Moral Reasoning. In Thom Brooks (ed.), New Waves in Ethics. Palgrave
  26.  28
    Kenneth Burke (1954/1984). Permanence and Change: An Anatomy of Purpose. University of California Press.
    INTRODUCTION In an age of specialists, Kenneth Burke's writings offend those who are content with a partial view of human motivation. ...
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   8 citations  
  27. David Michael Kleinberg-Levin (1989). The Listening Self: Personal Growth, Social Change, and the Closure of Metaphysics. Routledge.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  28.  27
    Lawrence Torcello (2016). The Ethics of Belief, Cognition, and Climate Change Pseudoskepticism: Implications for Public Discourse. Topics in Cognitive Science 8 (1):19-48.
    The relationship between knowledge, belief, and ethics is an inaugural theme in philosophy; more recently, under the title “ethics of belief” philosophers have worked to develop the appropriate methodology for studying the nexus of epistemology, ethics, and psychology. The title “ethics of belief” comes from a 19th-century paper written by British philosopher and mathematician W.K. Clifford. Clifford argues that we are morally responsible for our beliefs because each belief that we form creates the cognitive circumstances for related beliefs to follow, (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  29. Jussi Suikkanen (2014). Contractualism and Climate Change. In Marcello Di Paola & Gianfranco Pellegrino (eds.), Canned Heat: Ethics and Politics of Climate Change. Routledge 115-128.
    Climate change is ‘a complex problem raising issues across and between a large number of disciplines, including physical and life sciences, political science, economics, and psychology, to name just a few’ (Gardiner 2006: 397). It is also a moral problem. Therefore, in this chapter, I will consider what kind of a contribution an ethical theory called ‘contractualism’ can make to the climate change debates. This chapter first introduces contractualism. It then describes a simple climate change scenario. The (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  30.  9
    Earl S. Hishinuma (1998). Pre-Unified Separatism and Rapprochement Between Behaviorism and Cognitive Psychology: The Case of the Reinforcer. Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 18 (1):1-15.
    Psychology is in a preparadigmatic or pre-unified stage of scientific development. Two characteristics of psychology's status are: lack of cumulative scientific growth and experimental-theoretical overgeneralization. The reinforcer, as a construct in theories and as a critical element of behavioral change, has been a casualty of the separatism between such factions as radical behaviorism and cognitive psychology. In the end, psychology as a progressive science has been impeded, and psychological practitioners have been left to use intervention techniques that are not (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  31.  67
    Kevin N. Laland, John Odling-Smee & Marcus W. Feldman (2000). Niche Construction, Biological Evolution, and Cultural Change. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (1):131-146.
    We propose a conceptual model that maps the causal pathways relating biological evolution to cultural change. It builds on conventional evolutionary theory by placing emphasis on the capacity of organisms to modify sources of natural selection in their environment (niche construction) and by broadening the evolutionary dynamic to incorporate ontogenetic and cultural processes. In this model, phenotypes have a much more active role in evolution than generally conceived. This sheds light on hominid evolution, on the evolution of (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   54 citations  
  32.  61
    Eric Hochstein (2015). Giving Up on Convergence and Autonomy: Why the Theories of Psychology and Neuroscience Are Codependent as Well as Irreconcilable. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A:1-19.
    There is a long-standing debate in the philosophy of mind and philosophy of science regarding how best to interpret the relationship between neuroscience and psychology. It has traditionally been argued that either the two domains will evolve and change over time until they converge on a single unified account of human behaviour, or else that they will continue to work in isolation given that they identify properties and states that exist autonomously from one another (due to the multiple-realizability of (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  33. Gilbert Harman (1986). Change in View. MIT Press.
    Change in View offers an entirely original approach to the philosophical study of reasoning by identifying principles of reasoning with principles for revising one's beliefs and intentions and not with principles of logic. This crucial observation leads to a number of important and interesting consequences that impinge on psychology and artificial intelligence as well as on various branches of philosophy, from epistemology to ethics and action theory. Gilbert Harman is Professor of Philosophy at Princeton University. A Bradford Book.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   180 citations  
  34.  19
    Jack Martin & Mark H. Bickhard (eds.) (2012). The Psychology of Personhood: Philosophical, Historical, Social-Developmental and Narrative Perspectives. Cambridge University Press.
    Machine generated contents note: 1. Introducing persons and the psychology of personhood Jack Martin and Mark H. Bickhard; Part I. Philosophical, Conceptual Perspectives: 2. The person concept and the ontology of persons Michael A. Tissaw; 3. Achieving personhood: the perspective of hermeneutic phenomenology Charles Guignon; Part II. Historical Perspectives: 4. Historical psychology of persons: categories and practice Kurt Danziger; 5. Persons and historical ontology Jeff Sugarman; 6. Critical personalism: on its tenets, its historical obscurity, and its future prospects James T. (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  35.  67
    Ian Phillips (2014). Breaking the Silence: Motion Silencing and Experience of Change. Philosophical Studies 168 (3):693-707.
    The naïve view of temporal experience (Phillips, in: Lloyd D, Arstila V (eds) Subjective time: the philosophy, psychology, and neuroscience of temporality, forthcoming-a) comprises two claims. First, that we are perceptually aware of temporal properties, such as succession and change. Second, that for any temporal property apparently presented in experience, our experience itself possesses that temporal property. In his paper ‘Silencing the experience of change’ (forthcoming), Watzl argues that this second naïve inheritance thesis faces a novel counter-example in (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  36.  13
    Maria Magoula Adamos (2001). Aristotle on Emotions and Contemporary Psychology. In D. Sfendoni-Mentzou J. Hattiangdi & D. Johnson (eds.), Aristotle and Contemporary Science. Peter Lang 226-235.
    Aristotle has always been seriously considered on almost every philosophical topic (metaphysics, logic, ethics politics, etc.). Yet, his extremely insightful theory of emotions, which in many ways anticipates contemporary theories, has been virtually ignored by philosophers and psychologists alike. Those who write on the topic rarely mention Aristotle, unless they are concerned with the historical theories of emotions. However, Aristotle, who was a psychologist as well as a philosopher, was very much interested in emotions and he discusses (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  37.  64
    Paul R. Thagard (1990). Concepts and Conceptual Change. Synthese 82 (2):255-74.
    This paper argues that questions concerning the nature of concepts that are central in cognitive psychology are also important to epistemology and that there is more to conceptual change than mere belief revision. Understanding of epistemic change requires appreciation of the complex ways in which concepts are structured and organized and of how this organization can affect belief revision. Following a brief summary of the psychological functions of concepts and a discussion of some recent accounts of what concepts (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  38.  5
    Jack Martin & Jeff Sugarman (2009). Does Interpretation in Psychology Differ From Interpretation in Natural Science? Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 39 (1):19-37.
    Following an initial discussion of the general nature of interpretation in contemporary psychology, and social and natural science, relevant views of Charles Taylor and Thomas Kuhn are considered in some detail. Although both Taylor and Kuhn agree that interpretation in the social or human sciences differs in some ways from interpretation in the natural sciences, they disagree about the nature and origins of such difference. Our own analysis follows, in which we consider differences in interpretation between the natural and social (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  39.  13
    Anika Fiebich (2016). Narratives, Culture, and Folk Psychology. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 15 (1):135-149.
    In this paper, I aim to determine to what extent contemporary cross-cultural and developmental research can shed light on the role that narrative practices might play in the development of folk psychology. In particular, I focus on the role of narrative practices in the development of false belief understanding, which has been regarded as a milestone in the development of folk psychology. Second, I aim to discuss possible cognitive procedures that may underlie successful performance in false belief tasks. Methodologically, I (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  40.  5
    Renke Fahl & Morus Markard (1999). The Project "Analysis of Psychological Practice" Or: An Attempt at Connecting Psychology Critique and Practice Research. Outlines. Critical Practice Studies 1 (1):73-98.
    Using interviews and group discussions, researchers and students from the Free University of Berlin and psychological practitioners work together in a project called 'The Analysis of Psychological Practice', theoretically based on 'Critical Psychology'. The aim is to find out whether and how practitioners deal with the contradictions between experimental-statistical orientation of traditional academic psychology and the single-case-orientation of psychological practice. Can practitioners relate to 'scientific' psychology at all? How do they deal with the contradiction that psychological practitioners are expected to (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  41. Anna-Mari Rusanen & Samuli Poyhonen (2012). Concepts in Change. Science and Education 22 (6):1389–1403.
    In this article we focus on the concept of concept in conceptual change. We argue that (1) theories of higher learning must often employ two different notions of concept that should not be conflated: psychological and scientific concepts. The usages for these two notions are partly distinct and thus straightforward identification between them is unwarranted. Hence, the strong analogy between scientific theory change and individual learning should be approached with caution. In addition, we argue that (2) research in (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  42.  32
    Robert Anton Wilson (1990). Quantum Psychology: How Brain Software Programs You and Your World. New Falcon.
    Throughout human history, thoughts, values and behaviors have been colored by language and the prevailing view of the universe. With the advent of Quantum Mechanics, relativity, non-Euclidean geometries, non-Aristotelian logic and General Semantics, the scientific view of the world has changed dramatically from just a few decades ago. Nonetheless, human thinking is still deeply rooted in the cosmology of the middle ages. Quantum Psychology is the book to change your way of perceiving yourself--and the universe for the 21st Century. (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  43. Hanne Andersen, Peter Barker & Xiang Chen (1996). Kuhn's Mature Philosophy of Science and Cognitive Psychology. Philosophical Psychology 9 (3):347 – 363.
    Drawing on the results of modem psychology and cognitive science we suggest that the traditional theory of concepts is no longer tenable, and that the alternative account proposed by Kuhn may now be seen to have independent empirical support quite apart from its success as part of an account of scientific change. We suggest that these mechanisms can also be understood as special cases of general cognitive structures revealed by cognitive science. Against this background, incommensurability is not an insurmountable (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   7 citations  
  44.  66
    H. Andersen, P. Barker & X. Chen (1998). Kuhn's Theory of Scientific Revolutions and Cognitive Psychology. Philosophical Psychology 11 (1):5-28.
    In a previous article we have shown that Kuhn's theory of concepts is independently supported by recent research in cognitive psychology. In this paper we propose a cognitive re?reading of Kuhn's cyclical model of scientific revolutions: all of the important features of the model may now be seen as consequences of a more fundamental account of the nature of concepts and their dynamics. We begin by examining incommensurability, the central theme of Kuhn's theory of scientific revolutions, according to two different (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  45.  16
    Risto Saarinen (2011). Weakness of Will in Renaissance and Reformation Thought. Oxford University Press.
    In addition to considering the work of a broad range of Renaissance authors (including Petrarch, Donato Acciaiuoli, John Mair, and Francesco Piccolomini), Risto ...
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  46. Xiang Chen, Hanne Andersen & Peter Barker (1998). Kuhn's Theory of Scientific Revolutions and Cognitive Psychology. Philosophical Psychology 11 (1):5 – 28.
    In a previous article we have shown that Kuhn's theory of concepts is independently supported by recent research in cognitive psychology. In this paper we propose a cognitive re-reading of Kuhn's cyclical model of scientific revolutions: all of the important features of the model may now be seen as consequences of a more fundamental account of the nature of concepts and their dynamics. We begin by examining incommensurability, the central theme of Kuhn's theory of scientific revolutions, according to two different (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  47.  38
    Tim Fuller (2012). Is Scientific Theory Change Similar to Early Cognitive Development? Gopnik on Science and Childhood. Philosophical Psychology 26 (1):109 - 128.
    (2013). Is scientific theory change similar to early cognitive development? Gopnik on science and childhood. Philosophical Psychology: Vol. 26, No. 1, pp. 109-128. doi: 10.1080/09515089.2011.625114.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  48.  3
    Adrian Coyle (2011). Critical Responses to Faith Development Theory: A Useful Agenda for Change? Archive for the Psychology of Religion 33 (3):281-298.
    Since it was first presented, James Fowler’s faith development theory has proven influential in pastoral care and counselling, pastoral and practical theology, spiritual direction, and Christian education. However, it has also been subject to substantial critical evaluation. This article reviews the major themes within psychological critiques and considers the agenda provided by these critiques for the theory’s future development. Critical themes concern Fowler’s understanding of “faith”; the theory’s structural “logic of development”; its overemphasis on cognition and lack of attention to (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  49.  5
    Edwin E. Gantt (2002). Review of The Transformation of Psychology: Influences of 19th Century Philosophy, Technology, and Natural Science. [REVIEW] Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 22 (1):75-76.
    Reviews the book, The transformation of psychology: Influences of 19th century philosophy, technology, and natural science, edited by Christopher D. Green, Marlene Shore, and Thomas Teo . Many historians of psychology have noted that at the end of the 18th century, most leading thinkers felt strongly that by the vary nature of its subject matter psychology could never attain the level of natural science. However, by the beginning of the 20th century, an almost complete reversal of this position had occurred (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  50.  10
    Hendrika Vande Kemp (1990). Descriptive Psychology as Disciplined Phenomenology. Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 10 (1):54-58.
    Reviews the book, Persons, behavior, and the world. The descriptive psychology approach by Mary McDermott Shideler . In this book the author renders her own interpretation of Peter G. Ossorio's descriptive psychology. Descriptive psychology involves the parametric analysis of behavior, which the author summarizes verbally as follows: "Behavior is something that has the following aspects: an Identity, what that individual Wants, Knows, Knows How to do, Performs, and Achieves, what his Personal Characteristics are, and what the Significance of that behavior (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
1 — 50 / 545