Search results for 'Chantal Stern' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Kim Celone & Chantal Stern (2009). A Neuroimaging Perspective on the Use of Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (Fmri) in Educational and Legal Systems. American Journal of Bioethics 9 (1):28 – 29.score: 240.0
  2. Maya L. Rosen, Chantal E. Stern & David C. Somers (2014). Long-Term Memory Guidance of Visuospatial Attention in a Change-Detection Paradigm. Frontiers in Psychology 5.score: 240.0
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  3. Michael E. Hasselmo & Chantal E. Stern (2006). Mechanisms Underlying Working Memory for Novel Information. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 10 (11):487-493.score: 240.0
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  4. Robert Stern (2000). Transcendental Arguments and Scepticism: Answering the Question of Justification. Oxford University Press.score: 60.0
    Robert Stern investigates how scepticism can be countered by using transcendental arguments concerning the necessary conditions for the possibility of experience, language, or thought. He shows that the most damaging sceptical questions concern neither the certainty of our beliefs nor the reliability of our belief-forming methods, but rather how we can justify our beliefs.
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  5. Josef Stern (2011). Metaphor and Minimalism. Philosophical Studies 153 (2):273 - 298.score: 60.0
    This paper argues first that, contrary to what one would expect, metaphorical interpretations of utterances pass two of Cappelan and Lepore's Minimalist tests for semantic context-sensitivity. I then propose how, in light of that result, one might analyze metaphors on the model of indexicals and demonstratives, expressions that (even) Minimalists agree are semantically context-dependent. This analysis builds on David Kaplan's semantics for demonstratives and refines an earlier proposal in (Stern, Metaphor in context, MIT Press, Cambridge, 2000). In the course (...)
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  6. Robert Stern (2002). Routledge Philosophy Guidebook to Hegel and the Phenomenology of Spirit. Routledge.score: 60.0
    The Phenomenology of Spirit is Hegel's most important and famous work. It is essential to understanding Hegel's philosophical system and why he remains a major figure in western philosophy. Stern offers a clear and accessible introduction to what is undoubtedly one of the most complex books in the history of philosophy.
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  7. Josef Stern (2006). Metaphor, Literal, Literalism. Mind and Language 21 (3):243–279.score: 60.0
    This paper examines the place of metaphorical interpretation in the current Contextualist-Literalist controversy over the role of context in the determination of truth-conditions in general. Although there has been considerable discussion of 'non-literal' language by both sides of this dispute, the language analyzed involves either so-called implicit indexicality, loose or loosened use, enriched interpretations, or semantic transfer, not metaphor itself. In the first half of the paper, I critically evaluate Recanati's (2004) recent Contextualist account and show that it cannot account (...)
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  8. David G. Stern (1995). Wittgenstein on Mind and Language. Oxford University Press.score: 60.0
    Drawing on ten years of research on the unpublished Wittgenstein papers, Stern investigates what motivated Wittgenstein's philosophical writing and casts new light on the Tractatus and Philosophical Investigations. The book is an exposition of Wittgenstein's early conception of the nature of representation and how his later revision and criticism of that work led to a radically different way of looking at mind and language. It also explains how the unpublished manuscripts and typescripts were put together and why they often (...)
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  9. Robert Stern (2012). Understanding Moral Obligation: Kant, Hegel, Kierkegaard. Cambridge University Press.score: 60.0
    In many histories of modern ethics, Kant is supposed to have ushered in an anti-realist or constructivist turn by holding that unless we ourselves 'author' or lay down moral norms and values for ourselves, our autonomy as agents will be threatened. In this book, Robert Stern challenges the cogency of this 'argument from autonomy', and claims that Kant never subscribed to it. Rather, it is not value realism but the apparent obligatoriness of morality that really poses a challenge to (...)
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  10. M. S. Silk & J. P. Stern (1981). Nietzsche on Tragedy. Cambridge University Press.score: 60.0
    This is the first comprehensive study of Nietzsche's earliest (and extraordinary) book, The Birth of Tragedy (1872). When he wrote it, Nietzsche was a Greek scholar, a friend and champion of Wagner, and a philosopher in the making. His book has been very influential and widely read, but has always posed great difficulties for readers because of the particular way Nietzsche brings his ancient and modern interests together. The proper appreciation of such a work requires access to ideas that cross (...)
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  11. Daniel N. Stern (2010). Forms of Vitality: Exploring Dynamic Experience in Psychology, the Arts, Psychotherapy, and Development. OUP Oxford.score: 60.0
    In his new book, eminent psychologist - Daniel Stern, author of the classic 'The interpersonal world of the infant', explores the hitherto neglected topic of 'vitality' - that is, the force or power manifested by all living things. -/- Vitality takes on many dynamic forms and permeates daily life, psychology, psychotherapy and the arts, yet what is vitality? We know that it is a manifestation of life, of being alive. We are very alert to its feel in ourselves and (...)
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  12. Jeffery Aubin, Marie Chantal, Dianne M. Cole, Julio Cesar Dias Chaves, Cathelyne Duchesne, Christel Freu, Steve Johnston, Brice C. Jones, Amaury Levillayer, Stã©Phanie Machabã©E., Paul-Hubert Poirier, Philippe Therrien, Jonathan I. von Kodar, Martin Voyer & Jennifer K. Wees (2013). Littérature et histoire du christianisme ancien. Laval Théologique et Philosophique 69 (2):327-402.score: 60.0
    Jeffery Aubin ,Marie Chantal ,Dianne Cole ,Julio Chaves ,Cathelyne Duchesne ,Christel Freu ,Steve Johnston ,Brice Jones ,Amaury Levillayer ,Stéphanie Machabée ,Paul-Hubert Poirier ,Philippe Therrien ,Jonathan von Kodar ,Martin Voyer ,Jennifer Wees ,Eric Crégheur.
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  13. Joana Hurtado, Christian Caujolle, Joan Fontcuberta & Radu Stern (eds.) (2008). La Ubiqüitat de la Imatge =. Generalitat de Catalunya, Departament de Cultura, I Mitjans de Comunicació.score: 60.0
    Aquest llibre recull els textos de les reflexions que van tenir lloc en l'encont re internacional SCAN (festival de fotografia), a Internet del 29 de febrer al 1 7 d'abril de 2008, i al Teatre Metropol, el dia 17 d'abril de 2008. Tres teòrics de la imatge de reconegut prestigi internacional -Christian Caujolle, Joan Font cuberta i Radu Stern- van debatre virtualment a internet i posteriorment de form a presencial a Tarragona sobre el paper de la imatge al nostre (...)
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  14. Robert Stern (1990). Hegel, Kant and the Structure of the Object. Routledge.score: 60.0
    Hegel's holistic metaphysics challenges much recent ontology with its atomistic and reductionist assumptions; Stern offers us an original reading of Hegel and contrasts him with his predecessor, Kant.
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  15. Paul Stern (2008). Knowledge and Politics in Plato's Theaetetus. Cambridge University Press.score: 60.0
    The Theaetetus is one of the most widely studied of any of the Platonic dialogues because its dominant theme concerns the significant philosophical question, what is knowledge? In this new interpretation of the Theaetetus, Paul Stern provides the first full-length treatment of its political character in relationship to this dominant theme. Stern argues that this approach sheds significant light on the distinctiveness of the Socratic way of life, with respect to both its initial justification and its ultimate character.
     
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  16. August Stern (1992). Matrix Logic and Mind: A Probe Into a Unified Theory of Mind and Matter. Distributors for the U.S. And Canada, Elsevier Science Pub. Co..score: 60.0
    In this revolutionary work, the author sets the stage for the science of the 21st Century, pursuing an unprecedented synthesis of fields previously considered unrelated. Beginning with simple classical concepts, he ends with a complex multidisciplinary theory requiring a high level of abstraction. The work progresses across the sciences in several multidisciplinary directions: Mathematical logic, fundamental physics, computer science and the theory of intelligence. Extraordinarily enough, the author breaks new ground in all these fields. In the field of fundamental physics (...)
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  17. David G. Stern (2004). Wittgenstein's Philosophical Investigations: An Introduction. Cambridge University Press.score: 60.0
    An Introduction David G. Stern. 3.2 THE MOTTO AS A GUIDE TO THE TEXT: GENETIC READINGS, IMMANENT READINGS, AND BEYOND Given that the motto is left out of the srandatd translations, what reason do we have to rake it setiously ...
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  18. David G. Stern (2004). Wittgenstein's Philosophical Investigations: An Introduction. Cambridge University Press.score: 60.0
    In this new introduction to a classic philosophical text, David Stern examines Wittgenstein's Philosophical Investigations. He gives particular attention to both the arguments of the Investigations and the way in which the work is written, and especially to the role of dialogue in the book. While he concentrates on helping the reader to arrive at his or her own interpretation of the primary text, he also provides guidance to the unusually wide range of existing interpretations, and to the reasons (...)
     
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  19. Robert Stern (2007). Transcendental Arguments: A Plea for Modesty. Grazer Philosophische Studien 74 (1):143-161.score: 30.0
    A modest transcendental argument is one that sets out merely to establish how things need to appear to us or how we need to believe them to be, rather than how things are. Stroud's claim to have established that all transcendental arguments must be modest in this way is criticised and rejected. However, a different case for why we should abandon ambitious transcendental arguments is presented: namely, that when it comes to establishing claims about how things are, there is no (...)
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  20. Tom Stern (2008). Nietzsche on Context and the Individual. Nietzscheforschung 15:299-315.score: 30.0
    This paper offers a reading of Thus Spoke Zarathustra, arguing that there is a conflict between Zarathustra's hope for something greater (in the form of the Übermensch) and his conception of the eternal recurrence.
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  21. Tom Stern (2009). Nietzsche, Freedom and Writing Lives. Arion 17 (1):85-110.score: 30.0
    Nietzsche writes a great deal about freedom throughout his work, but never more explicitly than in Twiling of the Idols, a book he described as 'my philosophy in a nutshell'. This paper offers an analysis of Nietzsche's conception freedom and the role it plays within Twilight.
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  22. Reuben J. Stern (2008). Stakeholder Theory and Media Management: Ethical Framework for News Company Executives. Journal of Mass Media Ethics 23 (1):51 – 65.score: 30.0
    Contrary to stockholder theories that place the interests of profit-seeking owners above all else, stakeholder theorists argue that corporate executives have moral and ethical obligations to consider equally the interests of a wide range of stakeholders affected by the actions of a corporation. This paper argues that the stakeholder approach is particularly appropriate for the governance of news media companies and outlines an ethical framework to guide news company executives.
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  23. Robert Stern (2008). Kant's Response to Skepticism. In John Greco (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Skepticism. Oxford University Press. 265.score: 30.0
    Within much contemporary epistemology, Kant’s response to skepticism has come to be epitomized by an appeal to transcendental arguments. This form of argument is said to provide a distinctively Kantian way of dealing with the skeptic, by showing that what the skeptic questions is in fact a condition for her being able to raise that question in the first place, if she is to have language, thoughts, or experiences at all. In this way, it is hoped, the game played by (...)
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  24. Robert Stern (ed.) (1999). Transcendental Arguments: Problems and Prospects. Oxford University Press.score: 30.0
    In this volume of fourteen new essays, a distinguished team of philosophers offer a broad and stimulating examination of the nature, role, and value of transcendental arguments. Transcendental arguments aim to show that what is doubted or denied by the sceptic must be the case, as a condition for the possibility of experience, language, or thought. The essays consider how successful such arguments are as a response to sceptical problems.
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  25. Josef Stern (2007). The Life and Death of a Metaphor, or the Metaphysics of Metaphor. The Baltic International Yearbook of Cognition, Logic and Communication 3 (1).score: 30.0
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  26. Robert G. Meyers & Kenneth Stern (1973). Knowledge Without Paradox. Journal of Philosophy 70 (6):147-160.score: 30.0
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  27. Daniel B. Klein & Charlotta Stern (2005). Professors and Their Politics: The Policy Views of Social Scientists. Critical Review 17 (3-4):257-303.score: 30.0
    Abstract Academic social scientists overwhelmingly vote Democratic, and the Democratic hegemony has increased significantly since 1970. Moreover, the policy preferences of a large sample of the members of the scholarly associations in anthropology, economics, history, legal and political philosophy, political science, and sociology generally bear out conjectures about the correspondence of partisan identification with left/right ideal types; although across the board, both Democratic and Republican academics favor government action more than the ideal types might suggest. Variations in policy views among (...)
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  28. Robert Stern (1999). Going Beyond the Kantian Philosophy: On McDowell's Hegelian Critique of Kant. European Journal of Philosophy 7 (2):247–269.score: 30.0
    The Kant-Hegel relation has a continuing fascination for commentators on Hegel, and understandably so: for, taking this route into the Hegelian jungle can promise many advantages. First, it can set Hegel’s thought against a background with which we are fairly familiar, and in a way that makes its relevance clearly apparent; second, it can help us locate Hegel in the broader philosophical tradition, making us see that the traditional ‘analytic’ jump from Kant to Frege leaves out a crucial period in (...)
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  29. Robert Stern (2007). Hegel, British Idealism, and the Curious Case of the Concrete Universal. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 15 (1):115 – 153.score: 30.0
    [INTRODUCTION] Like the terms 'dialectic', 'Aufhebung' (or 'sublation'), and 'Geist', the term 'concrete universal' has a distinctively Hegelian ring to it. But unlike these others, it is particularly associated with the British strand in Hegel's reception history, as having been brought to prominence by some of the central British Idealists. It is therefore perhaps inevitable that, as their star has waned, so too has any use of the term, while an appreciation of the problematic that lay behind it has seemingly (...)
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  30. Robert Stern (2004). Does ‘Ought’ Imply ‘Can’? And Did Kant Think It Does? Utilitas 16 (1):42-61.score: 30.0
    The aim of this article is twofold. First, it is argued that while the principle of ‘ought implies can’ is certainly plausible in some form, it is tempting to misconstrue it, and that this has happened in the way it has been taken up in some of the current literature. Second, Kant's understanding of the principle is considered. Here it is argued that these problematic conceptions put the principle to work in a way that Kant does not, so that there (...)
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  31. Robert Stern (2004). Coherence as a Test for Truth. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 69 (2):296–326.score: 30.0
    This paper sets out to demonstrate that a contrast can be drawn between coherentism as an account of the structure of justification, and coherentism as a method of inquiry. Whereas the former position aims to offer an answer to the ‘regress of justification’ problem, the latter position claims that coherence plays a vital and indispensable role as a criterion of truth, given the fallibility of cognitive methods such as perception and memory. It is argued that ‘early’ coherentists like Bradley and (...)
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  32. Robert Stern (2008). Hegel's Idealism. In Frederick C. Beiser (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Hegel and Nineteenth-Century Philosophy. Cambridge University Press. 137--74.score: 30.0
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  33. Daniel M. Hausman, Reuben Stern & Naftali Weinberger (2014). Systems Without a Graphical Causal Representation. Synthese 191 (8):1925-1930.score: 30.0
    There are simple mechanical systems that elude causal representation. We describe one that cannot be represented in a single directed acyclic graph. Our case suggests limitations on the use of causal graphs for causal inference and makes salient the point that causal relations among variables depend upon details of causal setups, including values of variables.
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  34. Tom Stern (2011). Back to the Future: Eternal Recurrence and the Death of Socrates. Journal of Nietzsche Studies 41 (1):73-82.score: 30.0
  35. Robert Stern (2010). Moral Scepticism and Agency: Kant and Korsgaard. Ratio 23 (4):453-474.score: 30.0
    One argument put forward by Christine Korsgaard in favour of her constructivist appeal to the nature of agency, is that it does better than moral realism in answering moral scepticism. However, realists have replied by pressing on her the worry raised by H. A. Prichard, that any attempt to answer the moral sceptic only succeeds in basing moral actions in non-moral ends, and so is self-defeating. I spell out these issues in more detail, and suggest that both sides can learn (...)
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  36. Robert Stern (2011). Transcendental Argument. In Joel Smith & Peter Sullivan (eds.), Transcendental Philosophy and Naturalism. Oxford University Press. 74.score: 30.0
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  37. David S. Stern (2000). The Return of the Subject?: Power, Reflexivity and Agency. Philosophy and Social Criticism 26 (5):109-122.score: 30.0
    The deconstruction of the subject associated with postmodernism cannot be said to have simply carried the day. Opponents and critics of postmodernism have held that we must return to the subject and to autonomy as a necessary condition of thinking about ethics, politics, agency and responsibility. Indeed, Peter Dews has recently argued that efforts to displace the subject repeat rather than dissolve the problems generated by subject-centered theories, a charge he takes to be devastating. The implications of this return to (...)
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  38. David G. Stern (1991). Models of Memory: Wittgenstein and Cognitive Science. Philosophical Psychology 4 (2):203-18.score: 30.0
  39. Robert Stern (2009). The Autonomy of Morality and the Morality of Autonomy. Journal of Moral Philosophy 6 (3):395-415.score: 30.0
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  40. Lawrence Stern (1974). Freedom, Blame, and Moral Community. Journal of Philosophy 71 (3):72-84.score: 30.0
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  41. Robert Stern (2007). Peirce, Hegel, and the Category of Secondness. Inquiry 50 (2):123 – 155.score: 30.0
    This paper focuses on one of C. S. Peirce's criticisms of G. W. F. Hegel: namely, that Hegel neglected to give sufficient weight to what Peirce calls "Secondness", in a way that put his philosophical system out of touch with reality. The nature of this criticism is explored, together with its relevant philosophical background. It is argued that while the issues Peirce raises go deep, in some respects Hegel's position is closer to his own than he may have realised, whilst (...)
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  42. David G. Stern (2010). Review Article: The Bergen Electronic Edition of Wittgenstein's Nachlass. European Journal of Philosophy 18 (3):455-467.score: 30.0
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  43. Thomas Dietz & Paul C. Stern (1998). Science, Values, and Biodiversity. BioScience 48 (6):441-444.score: 30.0
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  44. David G. Stern (2007). Wittgenstein, the Vienna Circle, and Physicalism: A Reassessment. In Alan Richardson & Thomas Uebel (eds.), The Cambridge Companion to Logical Empiricism. Cambridge University Press. 305--31.score: 30.0
    The "standard account" of Wittgenstein’s relations with the Vienna Circle is that the early Wittgenstein was a principal source and inspiration for the Circle’s positivistic and scientific philosophy, while the later Wittgenstein was deeply opposed to the logical empiricist project of articulating a "scientific conception of the world." However, this telegraphic summary is at best only half-true and at worst deeply misleading. For it prevents us appreciating the fluidity and protean character of their philosophical dialogue. In retrospectively attributing clear-cut positions (...)
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  45. Martin Barrett, Hayley Clatterbuck, Michael Goldsby, Casey Helgeson, Brian McLoone, Trevor Pearce, Elliott Sober, Reuben Stern & Naftali Weinberger (2012). Puzzles for ZFEL, McShea and Brandon's Zero Force Evolutionary Law. Biology and Philosophy 27 (5):723-735.score: 30.0
    In their 2010 book, Biology’s First Law, D. McShea and R. Brandon present a principle that they call ‘‘ZFEL,’’ the zero force evolutionary law. ZFEL says (roughly) that when there are no evolutionary forces acting on a population, the population’s complexity (i.e., how diverse its member organisms are) will increase. Here we develop criticisms of ZFEL and describe a different law of evolution; it says that diversity and complexity do not change when there are no evolutionary causes.
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  46. August Stern (2000). Quantum Theoretic Machines: What is Thought From the Point of View of Physics. Elsevier.score: 30.0
    Making Sense of Inner Sense 'Terra cognita' is terra incognita. It is difficult to find someone not taken abackand fascinated by the incomprehensible but indisputable fact: there are material systems which are aware of themselves. Consciousness is self-cognizing code. During homo sapiens's relentness and often frustrated search for self-understanding various theories of consciousness have been and continue to be proposed. However, it remains unclear whether and at what level the problems of consciousness and intelligent thought can be resolved. Science's greatest (...)
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  47. Josef Stern (1985). Metaphor as Demonstrative. Journal of Philosophy 82 (12):677-710.score: 30.0
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  48. David Stern (2012). Taking Wittgenstein at His Word: A Textual Study (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 50 (1):147-148.score: 30.0
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  49. Robert Stern (2012). Is Hegel's Master–Slave Dialectic a Refutation of Solipsism? British Journal for the History of Philosophy 20 (2):333-361.score: 30.0
    This paper considers whether Hegel's master/slave dialectic in the Phenomenology of Spirit should be considered as a refutation of solipsism. It focuses on a recent and detailed attempt to argue for this sort of reading that has been proposed by Frederick Beiser ? but it argues that this reading is unconvincing, both in the historical motivations given for it in the work of Jacobi and Fichte, and as an interpretation of the text itself. An alternative reading of the dialectic is (...)
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  50. Robert Stern (2006). Metaphysical Dogmatism, Humean Scepticism, Kantian Criticism. Kantian Review 11 (1):102-116.score: 30.0
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