Search results for 'Chapter Iii' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Chapter Iii, The Cynosure.score: 240.0
    "I have often been reproached with being the father of Anarchism. This is doing me too great an honour. The father of Anarchism is the immortal Proudhon, who expounded it for the first time in 1848.".
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  2. Read It At Chapter (2002). Review Essay Read It at Chapter: Francis of Assisi and the Scritti. Franciscan Studies 60:341.score: 180.0
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  3. Philip Brey, Lee Caragata, James Dickinson, David Glidden, Sara Gottlieb, Bruce Hannon, Ian Howard, Jeff Malpas, Katya Mandoki, Jonathan Maskit, Bryan G. Norton, Roger Paden, David Roberts, Holmes Rolston Iii, Izhak Schnell, Jonathon M. Smith, David Wasserman & Mick Womersley (1998). Philosophy and Geography Iii: Philosophies of Place. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.score: 180.0
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  4. I. Chapter (1950). The Economic Situation Chapter I. The Home Economy. Social Research 2 (1):17-29.score: 180.0
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  5. R. W. H., E. Kunze & Orchomenos Iii (1935). Orchomenos III: die Keramik der fruhen Bronzezeit. Journal of Hellenic Studies 55:86.score: 180.0
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  6. Marvin Minsky, Chapter III. From Pain to Suffering.score: 150.0
    §3-1. Being in Pain................................................................................................ .............................................. 1 §3-2. Why does Persistent Pain lead to Suffering?.......................................................................................... .... 2 §3-3. The Machinery of Suffering........................................................................................... ............................ 4..
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  7. Francis William Newman (2009). Chapter III. Reign of David. The Works of Francis William Newman on Religion 1:79-116.score: 150.0
    David, king in Hebron.—Battle near Gibeon.—Murder of Abner.—Jerusalem.—State of Hebrew industry.—Conquest of Moab.—First war with the Zobahites.—Conquest of Edom.—Prosperity of David.—Ammonite war.—Destruction of the Ammonites.—Career of Absalom.—Death of Absalom.—Disgrace of Mephibosheth.—Immolation of Saul’s descendants.—The pestilence.—Conspiracy of Adonijah.—Death of David.
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  8. J. F. Mountford (1928). Some Questions of Musical Theory Some Questions of Musical Theory: Chapter III., The Second String; Chapter IV., Ptolemy's Tetrachords. By Wilfred Perrett, B.A., Ph.D. Pp. 31–97. Cambridge: W. Heffer and Sons, Ltd. 1928. 5s. Net. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 42 (05):193-194.score: 150.0
  9. Francis William Newman (2009). Chapter III. His Mission to de-Protestantize Us 1832-1842. The Works of Francis William Newman on Religion 7:69-85.score: 150.0
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  10. Cours de Linguistique Generals (1970). In Chapter III, Grammatical Consequences of Phonetic Evolution, 1 of the Section on Diachronic Linguistics of His Course Saussure Discusses a Number of Morphophonemic Alternations, Such as That Between Ou and Eu in French (Pouvons: Peuvent, Ouvrier: Auvre, Nouveau: Neuf). His Definition of ALTERNA-TION is the Following. Foundations of Language: International Journal of Language and Philosophy 6:423.score: 150.0
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  11. William F. Obering (1938). Chapter III---The Moral Basis of Law, Natural Rights. Philosophical Studies of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 1:85-106.score: 150.0
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  12. T. Nicklin (1906). Rutherford's a Chapter in the History of Annotation A Chapter in the History of Annotation, Being Scholia Aristophanica, Vol. III. By William G. Rutherfoed, Formerly Head-Master of Westminster. London: Macmillan & Co., 1905. 8vo. Pp. Xii+494. 25s. Net. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 20 (02):115-117.score: 120.0
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  13. W. G. Rutherford (1906). A Chapter in the History of Annotation, Being Scholia Aristophanica, Vol. III. Journal of Hellenic Studies 26:182.score: 120.0
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  14. Donald F. Henze (1973). Hume, Treatise, III, I, 1. Philosophy 48 (185):277 - 283.score: 54.0
    The reappearance of Professor Alasdair MacIntyre's far-ranging and provocative article, ‘Hume on “is” and “ought”’, is the proximate cause of this short excursion to an old, well-scarred, and still fascinating battleground. Re-reading MacIntyre's brilliant offensive thrust led me to review the counter-attacks and diversionary movements that followed its first appearance. They in turn sent me back, inevitably and ultimately, to look again at the cause of this philosophic skirmishing: Section 1 of Part i of Book III of Hume's Treatise of (...)
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  15. L. Lawlor (2005). Un Ecart Infime (Part III): The Blind Spot in Foucault. Philosophy and Social Criticism 31 (5-6):665-685.score: 54.0
    This article is the third part of a trilogy investigating the relation between Merleau-Ponty and Foucault. All three essays are inspired by Foucault’s diagnosis of our epoch in terms of biopower. They therefore aim at the creation of a new concept of life. In ‘Un Ecart Infime (Part III)’, I lay out Foucault’s analysis, from the first chapter of The Order of Things, of Velázquez’s painting, Las Meninas. By stressing what Foucault says about the ‘sagittal lines’ exiting the painting, (...)
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  16. John Herman Randall (1977). Philosophy After Darwin: Chapters for the Career of Philosophy, Volume Iii, and Other Essays. Columbia University Press.score: 50.0
    The sequel to Volumes I and II of John Herman Randall, Jr.'s acclaimed history of modern philosophy, "The Career of Philosophy," This volume contains the ...
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  17. Jaimini (1916/1974). The Pûrva Mimâṃsa Sûtras of Jaimini: Chapters I-Iii. [New York,Ams Press.score: 50.0
     
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  18. Lawrence B. Porter (1994). Summa Contra Gentiles III, Chapters 131-135: A Rare Glimpse Into the Heart as Well as the Mind of Aquinas. The Thomist 58 (2):245-263.score: 40.0
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  19. Matthew C. Eshleman (2008). The Misplaced Chapter on Bad Faith, or Reading Being and Nothingness in Reverse. Sartre Studies International 14 (2):1-22.score: 36.0
    This essay argues that an adequate account of bad faith cannot be given without taking the second half of Being and Nothingness into consideration. There are two separate but related reasons for this. First, the objectifying gaze of Others provides a necessary condition for the possibility of bad faith. Sartre, however, does not formally introduce analysis of Others until Parts III and IV. Second, upon the introduction of Others, Sartre revises his view of absolute freedom. Sartre's considered view of freedom (...)
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  20. Ronald M. Green (2002). Stem Cell Research: A Target Article Collection Part III - Determining Moral Status. American Journal of Bioethics 2 (1):20 – 30.score: 36.0
    In this chapter, I review some of the background thinking concerning matters of moral status that I had developed in previous years and that I would now bring to the work of the Human Embryo Research Panel. Two ideas were at the forefront of my thinking. First, that biology usually offers not decisive "events" but only continuous processes of development. Second, in making status determinations we do not so much "identify" a point on a developmental continuum where moral respect (...)
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  21. José Manuel Garcia Valverde (2012). El comentario de Giacomo Zabarella a "De anima" III, 5: una interpretación mortalista de la psicología de Aristóteles. Ingenium. Revista Electrónica de Pensamiento Moderno y Metodología En Historia de la Ideas 6 (6):27-56.score: 36.0
    An important part of Aristotelianism has revolved around the different interpretations given to the famous fifth chapter of Aristotle’s De Anima lll. The brevity with which he spoke about an intellectual agent principle described as divine and everlasting has led to a lengthy debate between those who argue that this principle is part of the individual soul and those who think that it must be placed outside the individual intellectual powers. Among the latter, the interpretation of the Renaissance Aristotelian (...)
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  22. Susanne Bobzien (2014). Choice and Moral Responsibility in Nicomachean Ethics Iii 1-5. In R. Polansky (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to the Nicomachean Ethics. Cambridge University Press. 81-109.score: 30.0
    ABSTRACT: This paper serves two purposes: (i) it can be used by students as an introduction to chapters 1-5 of book iii of the NE; (ii) it suggests an answer to the unresolved question what overall objective this section of the NE has. The paper focuses primarily on Aristotle’s theory of what makes us responsible for our actions and character. After some preliminary observations about praise, blame and responsibility (Section 2), it sets out in detail how all the key notions (...)
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  23. Ira Georgia Kiourti (2010). Real Impossible Worlds : The Bounds of Possibility. Dissertation, University of St Andrewsscore: 30.0
    Lewisian Genuine Realism (GR) about possible worlds is often deemed unable to accommodate impossible worlds and reap the benefits that these bestow to rival theories. This thesis explores two alternative extensions of GR into the terrain of impossible worlds. It is divided in six chapters. Chapter I outlines Lewis’ theory, the motivations for impossible worlds, and the central problem that such worlds present for GR: How can GR even understand the notion of an impossible world, given Lewis’ reductive theoretical (...)
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  24. Steven Ravett Brown (2004). Structural Phenomenology: An Empirically-Based Model of Consciousness. Dissertation, University of Oregonscore: 30.0
    In this dissertation I develop a structural model of phenomenal consciousness that integrates contemporary experimental and theoretical work in philosophy and cognitive science. I argue that phenomenology must be “naturalized” and that it should be acknowledged as a major component of empirical research. I use this model to describe important phenomenal structures, and I then employ it to provide a detailed explication of tip-of-tongue phenomena. The primary aim of “structural phenomenology” is the creation of a general framework within which descriptions (...)
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  25. Dan Sperber (2000). Metarepresentations in an Evolutionary Perspective. In , [Book Chapter] (in Press). Oxford University Press.score: 30.0
    Humans are expert users of metarepresentations. How has this human metarepresentational capacity evolved? In order to contribute to the ongoing debate on this question, the chapter focuses on three more specific issues: i. How do humans metarepresent representations? ii. What came first: language, or metarepresentations? iii. Do humans have more than one metarepresentational ability?
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  26. John Ross Churchill, Divine Sustenance and Theological Compatibilism.score: 30.0
    This thesis presents a case for theological compatibilism, the view that divine foreknowledge and human freedom are compatible. My attempt to support theological compatibilism is based chiefly upon two arguments, which appear in the second and third chapters of this thesis. While these arguments differ, they are united in one respect: each argument relies heavily upon the doctrine of divine sustenance, which is the doctrine that God is causally responsible for the continual existence of the universe. In chapter II, (...)
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  27. Dale E. Miller (1998). Internal Sanctions in Mill's Moral Psychology. Utilitas 10 (01):68-.score: 30.0
    Mill's discussion of ‘the internal sanction’ in chapter III of Utilitarianism does not do justice to his understanding of internal sanctions; it omits some important points and obscures others. I offer an account of this portion of his moral psychology of motivation which brings out its subtleties and complexities. I show that he recognizes the importance of internal sanctions as sources of motives to develop and perfect our characters, as well as of motives to do our duty, and I (...)
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  28. H. Jong Kim (2004). What Does the Second Form of the Ontological Argument Prove? International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 56 (1):17 - 40.score: 30.0
    Some forty years ago, Norman Malcolm and Charles Hartshorne, philosophers from two distinctive schools of thought, championed, independently of each other, a form of ontological argument based on chapter III of Anselm’s Proslogion as well as on various chapters of Reply to Gaunilo.1 While different aspects of the argument are emphasized by Malcolm and Hartshorne, this second form of the ontological argument hinges on the following two points: (1) necessary existence is constitutive of the concept of God,2 and (2) (...)
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  29. Jennifer McRobert (1987). The Construction of Empirical Concepts and the Establishment of the Real Possibility of Empirical Lawlikeness in Kant's Philosophy of Science. Dissertation, Dalhousie Universityscore: 30.0
    In Chapter I, I discuss Buchdahl’s view that the possibility of empirical lawlikeness could not have been established in the Principles of the Critique given the differences between transcendental, metaphysical and empirical lawlikeness, and the connection between the faculty of Reason and empirical lawlikeness. I then discuss the general conditions for empirical hypotheses according to Kant, which include the justification of the method by which an empirical hypothesis is obtained and the establishment of the general and specific constructability of (...)
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  30. V. Castellani (2004). Book Review: The Mediterranean Revisited. [REVIEW] Diogenes 51 (4):89-91.score: 30.0
    This is a multi-authored review of a book that is extremely rich and lengthy (43 chapters, among whose titles are: Chapter III, In the name of the Lord God, this round Earth of the Ancients becomes flat again. Or perhaps not? (In which - by way of preface - the story is told of how our great Sphere, which was measured and drawn by Egyptian Alexandria, became a Mystery, Sacrilege and dark until ten years ago); Chapter X, Strabo: (...)
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  31. Agustín A. Gordillo (2003). An Introduction to Law. Esperia Publications.score: 30.0
    CHAPTER III THE FACTS OF THE CASE: FACTS AND EVIDENCE 1. The Importance of the Case THE theory and practice of law come down to the application of scientific methodology in the analysis of cases1, because the law is, in fact, ...
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  32. Saharon Shelah (1989). The Number of Pairwise Non-Elementary-Embeddable Models. Journal of Symbolic Logic 54 (4):1431-1455.score: 30.0
    We get consistency results on I(λ, T 1 , T) under the assumption that D(T) has cardinality $>|T|$ . We get positive results and consistency results on IE(λ, T 1 , T). The interest is model-theoretic, but the content is mostly set-theoretic: in Theorems 1-3, combinatorial; in Theorems 4-7 and 11(2), to prove consistency of counterexamples we concentrate on forcing arguments; and in Theorems 8-10 and 11(1), combinatorics for counterexamples; the rest are discussion and problems. In particular: (A) By Theorems (...)
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  33. Sujata Purkayastha Bhattacharyya (2000). Sarvajñātmamuni's Contribution to Advaita Vedānta. Punthi Pustak.score: 30.0
    Machine generated contents note: PREFACE -- SCHEME OF TRANSLITERATION -- ABBREVIATIONS -- CHAPTER I: INTRODUCTION 1-13 -- 1. Sarvajfiatmamuni, His Date, Life and Works1 -- 2. Scope And Utility of the Present Study 10 -- References11 -- CHAPTER II: ANUBANDHAS 14-24 -- Adhikarin or Competent person 14 -- Prayojanaor Necessity19 -- Necessity of Brahmavicdra20 -- References 22 -- CHAPTER III : THE CONCEPT OF BRAHMAN 25-52 -- 1. Significance of the Upanisads in Brahman25 -- 2. The Nature (...)
     
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  34. George Santayana (1962). The Life of Reason. New York, Collier Books.score: 30.0
    VOLUME V REASON IN SCIENCE CHAPTER 1 179 TYPES AND AIMS OF SCIENCE CHAPTER II 204 HISTORY CHAPTER III 225 MECHANISM ...
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  35. Lon Becker (2004). That Von Neumann Did Not Believe in a Physical Collapse. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 55 (1):121-135.score: 26.0
    Many works intended to introduce interpretive issues in quantum mechanics present John von Neumann as having a view in which measurement produces a physical collapse in the system being measured. In this paper I argue that such a reading of von Neumann is inconsistent with what von Neumann actually says. I show that much of what he says makes no sense on the physical collapse reading, but falls into place if we assume he does not have such a view. I (...)
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  36. Markku Roinila (2011). Leibniz on Emotions and the Human Body. In Breger Herbert, Herbst Jürgen & Erdner Sven (eds.), Natur und Subjekt (IX. Internationaler Leibniz-Kongress Vorträge). Leibniz Geschellschaft.score: 24.0
    Descartes argued that the passions of the soul were immediately felt in the body, as the animal spirits, affected by the movement of the pineal gland, spread through the body. In Leibniz the effect of emotions in the body is a different question as he did not allow the direct interaction between the mind and the body, although maintaining a psychophysical parallelism between them. -/- In general, he avoids discussing emotions in bodily terms, saying that general inclinations, passions, pleasures and (...)
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  37. Gabriel Vacariu (2014). More Troubles with Cognitive Neuroscience. Einstein's Theory of Relativity and the Hyperverse. University of Bucharest Publishing Company.score: 24.0
    In my last two books 2012 and 2014, I investigated some important problems of cognitive neuroscience. The general conclusion of these two works (2012 and 2014) is that cognitive neuroscience is a pseudo-science. In Part I of this book 2014, Chapter 1, I introduce the EDWs perspective (from my book published in 2012). In Part II, I investigate more troubles with cognitive neuroscience. (For other troubles of this “science”, see Vacariu 2012, Vacariu and Vacariu 2013) In Chapter 2, (...)
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  38. Olof Pettersson (2013). A Multiform Desire. Dissertation, Uppsala Universityscore: 24.0
    This dissertation is a study of appetite in Plato’s Timaeus, Republic and Phaedrus. In recent research is it often suggested that Plato considers appetite (i) to pertain to the essential needs of the body, (ii) to relate to a distinct set of objects, e.g. food or drink, and (iii) to cause behaviour aiming at sensory pleasure. Exploring how the notion of appetite, directly and indirectly, connects with Plato’s other purposes in these dialogues, this dissertation sets out to evaluate these ideas. (...)
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  39. Matthew Kieran (2010). Teaching & Learning Guide For: Art, Morality and Ethics: On the (Im)Moral Character of Art Works and Inter-Relations to Artistic Value. Philosophy Compass 5 (5):426-431.score: 24.0
    Up until fairly recently it was philosophical orthodoxy – at least within analytic aesthetics broadly construed – to hold that the appreciation and evaluation of works as art and moral considerations pertaining to them are conceptually distinct. However, following on from the idea that artistic value is broader than aesthetic value, the last 15 years has seen an explosion of interest in exploring possible inter-relations between the appreciative and ethical character of works as art. Consideration of these issues has a (...)
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  40. Ian Phillips (2009). Experience and Time. Dissertation, UCLscore: 24.0
    We are no less directly acquainted with the temporal structure of the world than with its spatial structure. We hear one word succeeding another; feel two taps as simultaneous; or see the glow of a firework persisting, before it finally fizzles and fades. However, time is special, for we not only experience temporal properties; experience itself is structured in time. -/- Part One articulates a natural framework for thinking about experience in time. I claim (i) that experience in its experiential (...)
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  41. Rosanna Keefe (2010). Teaching & Learning Guide For: Vagueness: Supervaluationism. Philosophy Compass 5 (2):213-215.score: 24.0
    Vagueness is an extremely widespread feature of language, famously associated with the sorites paradox. One instance of this paradox concludes that a single grain of sand is a heap of sand, by starting with a large heap of sand and invoking the plausible premise that if you take one grain of sand away from a heap of sand, then you still have a heap. The supervaluationist theory of vagueness states that a sentence is true if and only if it is (...)
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  42. Peter Nilsson (2003). Empathy and Emotions: On the Notion of Empathy as Emotional Sharing. Dissertation, Umeå Universityscore: 24.0
    The topic of this study is a notion of empathy that is common in philosophy and in the behavioral sciences. It is here referred to as ‘the notion of empathy as emotional sharing’, and it is characterized in terms of three ideas. If a person, S, has empathy with respect to an emotion of another person, O, then (i) S experiences an emotion that is similar to an emotion that O is currently having, (ii) S’s emotion is caused, in a (...)
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  43. Karen Stohr (2010). Teaching & Learning Guide For: Contemporary Virtue Ethics. Philosophy Compass 5 (1):102-107.score: 24.0
    Virtue ethics is now well established as a substantive, independent normative theory. It was not always so. The revival of virtue ethics was initially spurred by influential criticisms of other normative theories, especially those made by Elizabeth Anscombe, Philippa Foot, John McDowell, Alasdair MacIntyre, and Bernard Williams. 1 Because of this heritage, virtue ethics is often associated with anti-theory movements in ethics and more recently, moral particularism. There are, however, quite a few different approaches to ethics that can reasonably claim (...)
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  44. Yitzhak Y. Melamed (2013). Spinoza's Metaphysics: Substance and Thought. Oxford University Press.score: 24.0
    This book is comprised of two parts. The first four chapters concentrate on the metaphysics of substance, while the last two address Spinoza’s metaphysics of thought. These two parts are closely connected, and several crucial claims in the last two chapters rely on arguments advanced in the first four. I intentionally use the term ‘metaphysics of thought’ rather than ‘philosophy of mind’ for two main reasons. First, the domain of thought in Spinoza is far more extensive than anything associated with (...)
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  45. Paisley Livingston (2010). Teaching & Learning Guide For: Cinema as Philosophy. Philosophy Compass 5 (4):359-362.score: 24.0
    The idea that films can be philosophical, or in some sense 'do' philosophy, has recently found a number of prominent proponents. What is at stake here is generally more than the tepid claim that some documentaries about philosophy and related topics convey philosophically relevant content. Instead, the contention is that cinematic fictions, including popular movies such as The Matrix , make significant contributions to philosophy. Various more specific claims are linked to this basic idea. One, relatively weak, but pedagogically important (...)
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  46. Henry Sidgwick (1901/2009). Methods of Ethics. Kaplan Pub..score: 24.0
    Introduction -- Ethics and politics -- Ethical judgments -- Pleasure and desire -- Free will -- Ethical principles and methods -- Egoism and self-love -- Chapter viii-intuitionism -- Good -- Book II: Egoism -- The principle and method of egoism -- Empirical hedonism -- Empirical hedonism (continued) -- Objective hedonism and common sense -- Happiness and duty -- Deductive hedonism -- Book III: Intuitionism -- Intuitionism -- Virtue and duty -- The intellectual virtues -- Benevolence -- Justice -- Laws (...)
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  47. Joseph B. Atkins (ed.) (2002). The Mission: Journalism, Ethics and the World. Iowa State University Press.score: 24.0
    Machine generated contents note: Contributors ix -- Foreword by Douglas A. Boyd andJoseph D. Straubhaar xiii -- Preface byMariaHenson xv -- Acknowledgments xvii -- Part I. Introduction 1 -- Chapter 1. Journalism as a Mission: Ethics and Purpose -- from an International Perspective -- by Joseph B. Atkins 3 -- Chapter 2. Chaos and Order: Sacrificing the Individual for the -- Sake of Social Harmony -- by John C. Merrill 17 -- Part II. In the United States and (...)
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  48. Mark Colyvan, Scientific Realism and Mathematical Nominalism: A Marriage Made in Hell.score: 24.0
    The Quine-Putnam Indispensability argument is the argument for treating mathematical entities on a par with other theoretical entities of our best scientific theories. This argument is usually taken to be an argument for mathematical realism. In this chapter I will argue that the proper way to understand this argument is as putting pressure on the viability of the marriage of scientific realism and mathematical nominalism. Although such a marriage is a popular option amongst philosophers of science and mathematics, in (...)
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  49. M. F. Burnyeat (2002). "De Anima" II 5. Phronesis 47 (1):28 - 90.score: 24.0
    This is a close scrutiny of "De Anima II 5", led by two questions. First, what can be learned from so long and intricate a discussion about the neglected problem of how to read an Aristotelian chapter? Second, what can the chapter, properly read, teach us about some widely debated issues in Aristotle's theory of perception? I argue that it refutes two claims defended by Martha Nussbaum, Hilary Putnam, and Richard Sorabji: (i) that when Aristotle speaks of the (...)
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  50. Yitzhak Y. Melamed (2013). “Spinoza’s Respublica Divina:” in Otfried Höffe (Ed.), Baruch de Spinozas Tractatus Theologico-Politicus (Berlin: Akademie Verlag (Klassiker Aulegen), Forthcoming). In Otfried Höffe (ed.), Baruch de Spinozas Tractatus theologico-politicus. Akademie Verlag (Klassiker Aulegen). 177-192.score: 24.0
    Chapters 17 and 18 of the TTP constitute a textual unit in which Spinoza submits the case of the ancient Hebrew state to close examination. This is not the work of a historian, at least not in any sense that we, twenty-first century readers, would recognize as such. Many of Spinoza’s claims in these chapters are highly speculative, and seem to be poorly backed by historical evidence. Other claims are broad-brush, ahistorical generalizations: for example, in a marginal note, Spinoza refers (...)
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