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  1.  3
    Charles Bingham (2016). Against Educational Humanism: Rethinking Spectatorship in Dewey and Freire. Studies in Philosophy and Education 35 (2):181-193.
    In this essay, I investigate the human act of spectatorship as found in the work of John Dewey and Paulo Freire. I will show that each is thoroughly anti-watching when it comes to educational practices. I then problematize their positions by looking at their spectatorial commitments in the realm of aesthetics. Both Dewey and Freire have a different opinion about spectatorship when it is a matter of watching art. I claim that this different in opinion derives from the practice of (...)
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  2.  35
    Charles Bingham (2009). Under the Name of Method: On Jacques Rancière's Presumptive Tautology. Journal of Philosophy of Education 43 (3):405-420.
    This paper investigates the philosophical method of Jacques Rancière, with special attention to use of the 'presumptive tautology'. It distinguishes between the Enlightenment conception of method as universally applicable technique, and the philosophical conception of method as a certain style that has been invented by a certain person. Ultimately, the paper puts the methodology of Rancière's The Ignorant Schoolmaster under scrutiny.
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  3.  12
    Charles Bingham (2005). The Hermeneutics of Educational Questioning. Educational Philosophy and Theory 37 (4):553–565.
    This article looks at the practice of educational questioning using the philosophical hermeneutics of Hans‐Georg Gadamer. It first looks at questions and statements from a hermeneutic perspective, demonstrating some of the differences and similarities between the two. It then details Gadamer's notion of the ‘true question’, asking whether it is possible for teachers to ask ‘true questions’. Then, it turns to some concrete ways to rethink educational questioning. Three themes are proposed, themes to keep in mind when educational questions are (...)
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  4.  28
    Charles Bingham (2011). Two Educational Ideas for 2011 and Beyond. Studies in Philosophy and Education 30 (5):513-519.
    In this article, I argue that education has come to a crossroads. It is so easy to become educated that the role of the teacher can be seen as redundant. Because of this fact, it is time to reconsider what the teacher does, and whether the aim of clear communication by the teacher can, or should, be an educational goal. I argue that clear communication can no longer be embraced. Instead I offer two new educational ideas for 2011 and beyond. (...)
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  5.  9
    Charles Bingham (2001). What Friedrich Nietzsche Cannot Stand About Education: Toward a Pedagogy of Self-Reformulation. Educational Theory 51 (3):337-352.
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  6.  4
    Charles W. Bingham (2007). Derrida on Teaching: The Economy of Erasure. Studies in Philosophy and Education 27 (1):15-31.
  7.  7
    Charles Bingham (2007). Montaigne, Nietzsche, and the Mnemotechnics of Student Agency. Educational Philosophy and Theory 39 (2):168–181.
    This essay explores the educational implications of the thought of Michel de Montaigne and Friedrich Nietzsche on the subject of memory. It explores the sorts of cultural memory practices that Nietzsche has called ‘mnemotechnics’, that is, the aspects of memory use that allow human beings to live life more fully. Nietzsche and Montaigne's work is explored because their work offers a different, and much more philosophically oriented, perspective on memory than is commonly discussed when educators speak of memory. Nietzsche and (...)
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  8.  4
    Charles Bingham (2015). Philosophy for Children as a Teaching Movement in an Era of Too Much Learning. Childhood and Philosophy 11 (22):223-240.
    In this article, I contextualize the community of inquiry approach, and Philosophy for Children, within the current milieu of education. Specifically, I argue that whereas former scholarship on Philosophy for Children had a tendency to critique the problems of teacher authority and knowledge transmission, we must now consider subtler, learner-centered scenarios of education as a threat to Philosophy for Children. I begin by offering a personal anecdote about my own experience attending a ‘reverse-integrated’ elementary school in 1968. I use this (...)
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  9.  13
    Charles Bingham (2010). Settling No Conflict in the Public Place: Truth in Education, and in Rancièrean Scholarship. Educational Philosophy and Theory 42 (5):649-665.
    This essay offers an educational understanding of truth deriving from the work of Jacques Rancière. Unlike other educational accounts—the traditional, progressive, and critical accounts—of truth that take education as a way of approaching pre-existing truths (or lack of pre-existing truths), this essay establishes an account of truth that is intrinsic to education. It uses Rancière's language theory to do so, showing that Rancière's own perspective on truth is in fact opposed to the one so often promoted in and through education. (...)
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  10.  23
    Charles Bingham (2002). On Paulo Freire's Debt to Psychoanalysis: Authority on the Side of Freedom. Studies in Philosophy and Education 21 (6):447-464.
    Paulo Freire's major work, Pedagogy of the Oppressed, owes adebt to psychoanalysis. In particular, as this paper argues,Freire's account of teacher authority needs to be understoodthrough psychoanalytic sensibilities. Paulo Freire maintains thatteacher authority can be ``on the side of freedom.'' This is ahighly charged claim given that liberalist traditions generallycast authority as the enemy of freedom. Breaking with liberalunderstandings of authority, Freire's ``authority on the sideof freedom'' is a matter of maintaining the delicate psychicbalance that leads neither to domination nor (...)
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  11.  6
    Charles Bingham (1998). The Goals of Language, the Language of Goals: Nietzsche's Concern with Rhetoric and its Educational Implications. Educational Theory 48 (2):229-240.
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  12. Charles Bingham (2006). Before Recognition, and After: The Educational Critique. Educational Theory 56 (3):325-344.
    Social struggles that turn on race, gender, and sexuality are struggles for recognition. At least, this has been a widespread assumption for decades. Yet this assumption has come under critique of late. In this essay, Charles Bingham looks into the debate that surrounds the recognitive paradigm. He looks both at the general debate, and then at the more specific educational debate around recognition. He concludes by highlighting the practical contributions that educators bring to recognitive discourse. Such practical contributions are missing (...)
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  13.  8
    Charles Bingham & Alexander Sidorkin (2001). Aesthetics and the Paradox of Educational Relation. Journal of Philosophy of Education 35 (1):21–30.
  14.  16
    Charles Bingham (1999). Language and Intersubjectivity. Philosophy in the Contemporary World 6 (3/4):9-14.
    Using the work of Maurice Merleau-Ponty and Jessica Benjamin, I here describe the role of language in achieving intersubjective relationships among persons.
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  15.  14
    Gert Biesta & Charles Bingham (2012). Response to Caroline Pelletier's Review of Jacques Rancière: Education, Truth, Emancipation. Studies in Philosophy and Education 31 (6):621-623.
  16.  18
    Charles Bingham (2006). The Literary Life of Educational Authority. Journal of Philosophy of Education 40 (3):357–369.
    This article looks into the workings of educational authority. While scholarly debate in education usually promotes authority as either good or bad, the same debate seldom asks questions about how authority works. This article is, then, an answer to the question ‘How?’ How does educational authority operate? It operates, it is suggested, in much the same way that literary authority operates. To make the case for educational authority as literary authority, the paper uses the philosophical work of Jacques Derrida and (...)
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  17. Charles Bingham & Alexander Sidorkin (2001). Aesthetics and the Paradox of Educational Relation. Journal of the Philosophy of Education 35 (1):21-30.
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  18. Linda Laidlaw, Ann E. Fordon, Jacqueline Davis, Jennifer A. Vadeboncoeur, Mary Bushnell, Michael Romanowski, Charles Bingham, Barbara J. Thayer-Bacon, Krempasky Jr & William B. Stanley (1999). Book Review Section 1. [REVIEW] Educational Studies 30 (3-4):297-387.
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