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Charles Ess [26]Charles M. Ess [2]
  1. Charles Ess (2012). At the Intersections Between Internet Studies and Philosophy: “Who Am I Online?”. Philosophy and Technology 25 (3):275-284.
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  2. Charles Ess (2011). Facebook and Philosophy. Techné: Research in Philosophy and Technology 15 (3):238-240.
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  3. Charles Ess (2011). Self, Community, and Ethics in Digital Mediatized Worlds. In Charles Ess & May Thorseth (eds.), Trust and Virtual Worlds. Peter Lang. 3--30.
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  4. Charles Ess & May Thorseth (eds.) (2011). Trust and Virtual Worlds. Peter Lang.
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  5. Charles Ess (2010). Brave New Worlds? The Once and Future Information Ethics. International Review of Information Ethics 12:35-43.
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  6. Charles M. Ess (2010). Trust and New Communication Technologies: Vicious Circles, Virtuous Circles, Possible Futures. [REVIEW] Knowledge, Technology and Policy 23 (3-4):287-305.
    I approach the philosophical analyses of the phenomenon of trust vis-à-vis online communication beginning with an overview from within the framework of computer-mediated communication (CMC) of concerns and paradigmatic failures of trust in the history of online communication. I turn to the more directly philosophical analyses of trust online by first offering an introductory taxonomy of diverse accounts of trust that have emerged over the past decade or so. In the face of important objections to the possibility of establishing and (...)
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  7. Elizabeth A. Buchanan & Charles M. Ess (2009). Internet Research Ethics and the Institutional Review Board: Current Practices and Issues. Acm Sigcas Computers and Society 39 (3):43-49.
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  8. Charles Ess (2008). Culture and Global Networks: Hope for a Global Ethics. In M. J. van den Joven & J. Weckert (eds.), Information Technology and Moral Philosophy. Cambridge University Press. 195--225.
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  9. Charles Ess (2008). Luciano Floridi's Philosophy of Information and Information Ethics: Critical Reflections and the State of the Art. [REVIEW] Ethics and Information Technology 10 (2-3):89-96.
    I describe the emergence of Floridi’s philosophy of information (PI) and information ethics (IE) against the larger backdrop of Information and Computer Ethics (ICE). Among their many strengths, PI and IE offer promising metaphysical and ethical frameworks for a global ICE that holds together globally shared norms with the irreducible differences that define local cultural and ethical traditions. I then review the major defenses and critiques of PI and IE offered by contributors to this special issue, and highlight Floridi’s responses (...)
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  10. Charles Ess & May Thorseth (2008). Kant and Information Ethics. Ethics and Information Technology 10 (4):205-211.
    We begin with our reasons for seeking to bring Kant to bear on contemporary information and computing ethics (ICE). We highlight what each contributor to this special issue draws from Kant and then applies to contemporary matters in ICE. We conclude with a summary of what these chapters individually and collectively tell us about Kant’s continuing relevance to these contemporary matters – specifically, with regard to the issues of building trust online and regulating the Internet; how far discourse contributing to (...)
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  11. Charles Ess (2007). Chapter Five Information Ethics: Local Approaches, Global Potentials? Or: Divergence, Convergence, and Ethical Pluralism as Maintaining Distinctive. In Soraj Hongladarom (ed.), Computing and Philosophy in Asia. Cambridge Scholars Pub.. 71.
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  12. Charles Ess (2007). Cybernetic Pluralism in an Emerging Global Information and Computing Ethics. International Review of Information Ethics 7:09.
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  13. Charles Ess (2007). Information Ethics: Local Approaches, Global Potentials? Or: Divergence, Convergence, and Ethical Pluralism as Maintaining Distinctive Cultural Identities and (Quasi?)-Universal Ethics. In Soraj Hongladarom (ed.), Computing and Philosophy in Asia. Cambridge Scholars Pub..
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  14. Charles Ess (2006). Ethical Pluralism and Global Information Ethics. Ethics and Information Technology 8 (4):215-226.
    A global information ethics that seeks to avoid imperialistic homogenization must conjoin shared norms while simultaneously preserving the irreducible differences between cultures and peoples. I argue that a global information ethics may fulfill these requirements by taking up an ethical pluralism – specifically Aristotle’s pros hen [“towards one”] or “focal” equivocals. These ethical pluralisms figure centrally in both classical and contemporary Western ethics: they further offer important connections with the major Eastern ethical tradition of Confucian thought. Both traditions understand ethical (...)
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  15. Charles Ess & May Thorseth (2006). Neither Relativism nor Imperialism: Theories and Practices for a Global Information Ethics. [REVIEW] Ethics and Information Technology 8 (3):91-95.
    We highlight the important lessons our contributors present in our collective project of fostering dialogues both between applied ethics and computer science and between cultures. These include: critical reflexivity; procedural (partly Habermasian) approaches to establishing such central norms as “emancipation”; the importance of local actors in using ICTs both for global management and in development projects – especially as these contribute the trust essential for the social context of use of new technologies; and pluralistic approaches that preserve local cultural differences (...)
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  16. Elizabeth Buchanan & Charles Ess (2005). The Ethics of E-Games. International Review of Information Ethics 4:2-6.
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  17. Charles Ess (2005). “Lost in translation”?: Intercultural dialogues on privacy and information ethics (introduction to special issue on privacy and data privacy protection in asia). [REVIEW] Ethics and Information Technology 7 (1):1-6.
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  18. Charles Ess (2002). Borgmann and the Borg. Techné 6 (1):21-32.
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  19. Charles Ess (2002). Computer-Mediated Colonization, the Renaissance, and Educational Imperatives for an Intercultural Global Village. Ethics and Information Technology 4 (1):11-22.
    ``The diversity of cultures in this world isreally important. It's the richness that wehave which, in fact, will save us from beingcaught up in one big idea''.Tim Berners-Lee (inventor of the Web)addressing the 10th International World WideWeb Conference, Hong Kong.
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  20. Charles Ess (2002). Cultures in Collision: Philosophical Lessons From Computer-Mediated Communication. In James Moor & Terrell Ward Bynum (eds.), Cyberphilosophy: The Intersection of Philosophy and Computing. Blackwell Pub.. 229-253.
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  21. Charles Ess (2002). Introduction. Ethics and Information Technology 4 (3):177-188.
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  22. Charles Ess (1999). Cultural Attitudes Towards Technology and Communication: New Directions of Research in Computer-Mediated Communication. [REVIEW] AI and Society 13 (4):329-340.
  23. Eh Hrachovec, Ravi Arapuraka, Stuart Broz, Charles Ess, G. -M. Killing, John MacDonald, Fiona Steinkamp, Paul Treanor & John Wong (1997). Could Democracy Be a Unicorn? The Monist 80 (3):423-447.
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  24. Charles Ess (1996). Karl Ameriks and Dieter Sturma, Eds., The Modern Subject: Conceptions of the Self in Classical German Philosophy Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 16 (4):236-238.
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  25. Charles Ess (1994). Immanuel Kant, Theoretical Philosophy, 1755-1770, David Walford and Ralf Meerbote, Eds. And Trans. Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 14 (1):24-26.
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  26. Charles Ess (1994). Robert Howell, Kant's Transcendental Deduction: An Analysis of Main Themes in His Critical Philosophy Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 14 (5):332-334.
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  27. Charles Ess & Walter B. Gulick (1994). Kant and Analogy: Categories as Analogical Equivocals. Ultimate Reality and Meaning 17 (2):89-99.
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  28. Charles Ess (1990). Reviews and Evaluations of Articles. Ultimate Reality and Meaning 13.
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