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  1. Ben Alderson-Day & Charles Fernyhough (2014). More Than One Voice: Investigating the Phenomenological Properties of Inner Speech Requires a Variety of Methods. Consciousness and Cognition 24:113-114.
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  2. Ben Alderson-Day, Simon McCarthy-Jones, Sarah Bedford, Hannah Collins, Holly Dunne, Chloe Rooke & Charles Fernyhough (2014). Shot Through with Voices: Dissociation Mediates the Relationship Between Varieties of Inner Speech and Auditory Hallucination Proneness. Consciousness and Cognition 27:288-296.
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  3. Simon McCarthy-Jones & Charles Fernyhough (2014). Corrigendum to “The Varieties of Inner Speech: Links Between Quality of Inner Speech and Psychopathological Variables in a Sample of Young Adults” [Consciousness and Cognition 20 (2011) 1586–1593]. [REVIEW] Consciousness and Cognition 23:40-41.
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  4. Elizabeth Meins, Charles Fernyhough & Jayne Harris-Waller (2014). Is Mind-Mindedness Trait-Like or a Quality of Close Relationships? Evidence From Descriptions of Significant Others, Famous People, and Works of Art. Cognition 130 (3):417-427.
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  5. Charles Fernyhough & Simon McCarthy-Jones (2013). 5 Thinking Aloud About Mental Voices. In Fiona Macpherson & Dimitris Platchias (eds.), Hallucination. Mit Press. 87.
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  6. Simon McCarthy-Jones, Joel Krueger, Frank Larøi, Matthew R. Broome & Charles Fernyhough (2013). Stop, Look, Listen: The Need for Philosophical Phenomenological Perspectives on Auditory Verbal Hallucinations. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.
    One of the leading cognitive models of auditory verbal hallucinations (AVHs) proposes such experiences result from a disturbance in the process by which inner speech is attributed to the self. Research in this area has, however, proceeded in the absence of thorough cognitive and phenomenological investigations of the nature of inner speech, against which AVHs are implicitly or explicitly defined. In this paper we begin by introducing philosophical phenomenology and highlighting its relevance to AVHs, before briefly examining the evolving literature (...)
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  7. Simon McCarthy-Jones & Charles Fernyhough (2011). The Varieties of Inner Speech: Links Between Quality of Inner Speech and Psychopathological Variables in a Sample of Young Adults. Consciousness and Cognition 20 (4):1586-1593.
  8. Simon R. Jones, Charles Fernyhough & Frank Larøi (2010). A Phenomenological Survey of Auditory Verbal Hallucinations in the Hypnagogic and Hypnopompic States. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 9 (2):213-224.
    The phenomenology of auditory verbal hallucinations (AVHs) occurring in hypnagogic and hypnopompic (H&H) states has received little attention. In a sample of healthy participants ( N = 325), 108 participants reported H&H AVHs and answered subsequent questions on their phenomenology. AVHs in the H&H state were found (1) to be more likely to only feature the occasional clear word than to be clear, (2) to be more likely (...)
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  9. Charles Fernyhough (2009). What Can We Say About the Inner Experience of the Young Child? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 32 (2):143-144.
    Inner experience is proposed as a basis for self-interpretation in both children and adults, but young children's inner experience may not be comparable to our own. I consider evidence on children's attribution of inner experience, experience sampling, and the development of inner speech, concluding that Carruthers' theory should predict a developmental lag between mindreading and metacognition.
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  10. Simon R. Jones & Charles Fernyhough (2008). Talking Back to the Spirits: The Voices and Visions of Emanuel Swedenborg. History of the Human Sciences 21 (1):1-31.
    The voices and visions experienced by Emanuel Swedenborg remain a topic of much debate. The present article offers a reconsideration of these experiences in relation to changes in psychiatric practice. First, the phenomenology of Swedenborg's experiences is reviewed through an examination of his writings. The varying conceptualizations of these experiences by Swedenborg and his contemporaries, and by psychiatrists of later generations, are examined. We show how attempts by 19th- and 20th-century psychiatrists to explain Swedenborg's condition as the result of either (...)
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  11. Charles Fernyhough (2005). What is Internalised? Dialogic Cognitive Representations and the Mediated Mind. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (5):698-699.
    Two aspects of Tomasello et al.'s account would benefit from further elaboration: (1) the construction of dialogic cognitive representations through social interaction, and (2) the cognitive consequences of operating with such representations. Vygotskian ideas on internalisation and verbal mediation may help us better to understand how dialogic cognitive representations can transform human cognition.
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  12. Charles Fernyhough (2004). More Than a Context for Learning? The Epistemic Triangle and the Dialogic Mind. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (1):104-105.
    Theory-of-mind (TOM) competence is under-specified in Carpendale & Lewis's (C&L's) account. In the neo-Vygotskian alternative outlined below, TOM development is driven by the internalisation of dialogic exchanges which preserve the triadic intentional relations of interactions within the epistemic triangle. On this view, TOM competence stems from children's ability to operate flexibly with the multiple perspectives manifested in internalised dialogue.
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