21 found
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  1.  11
    Charles Goodman (2014). Buddhism, Naturalism, and the Pursuit of Happiness. Zygon 49 (1):220-230.
    Owen Flanagan's important book The Bodhisattva's Brain presents a naturalized interpretation of Buddhist philosophy. Although the overall approach of the book is very promising, certain aspects of its presentation could benefit from further reflection. Traditional teachings about reincarnation do not contradict the doctrine of no self, as Flanagan seems to suggest; however, they are empirically rather implausible. Flanagan's proposed “tame” interpretation of karma is too thin; we can do better at fitting karma into a scientific worldview. The relationship between eudaimonist (...)
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  2.  61
    Charles Goodman (2009). Consequences of Compassion: An Interpretation and Defense of Buddhist Ethics. Oxford University Press.
    Fundamental Buddhist teachings -- Main features of some western ethical theories -- Teravāda ethics as rule-consequentialism -- Mahāyāna ethics before Śāntideva and after -- Transcending ethics -- Buddhist ethics and the demands of consequentialism -- Buddhism on moral responsibility -- Punishment -- Objections and replies -- A Buddhist response to Kant.
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  3.  11
    Charles Goodman, Libertarian Welfare Rights: Can We Expel Them?
    In Globalization and Global Justice, Nicole Hassoun presents a new andfundamental challenge to libertarian political thought. Her LegitimacyArgument tries to show that natural rights libertarians are committed bytheir own principles to a requirement that their states recognize and meetthe positive welfare rights of certain merely potentially autonomous persons.Unfortunately, this argument suffers from two flaws. Hassoun needs to show,but has not shown, that the libertarian state would have to infringe any ofthe negative rights of the merely potentially autonomous in such a (...)
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  4. Charles Goodman (2005). Vaibhāsika Metaphoricalism. Philosophy East and West 55 (3):377-393.
    : Scholars have proposed several different interpretations of the doctrine of no-self found in the Buddhist Abhidharma literature. It is argued here that two of these, Constitutive Reductionism and Eliminativism, are ruled out by textual evidence. A third, the Eliminative Reductionism of Siderits, is much closer to the intent of the texts.We can refine it further by attending to the role of metaphor in Vaibhāsika accounts of the no-self doctrine. If we update this view by drawing on analytic philosophy, the (...)
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  5.  50
    Charles Goodman (2002). Resentment and Reality: Buddhism on Moral Responsibility. American Philosophical Quarterly 39 (4):359-372.
  6.  43
    Christopher Morgan-Knapp & Charles Goodman (2015). Consequentialism, Climate Harm and Individual Obligations. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 18 (1):177-190.
    Does the decision to relax by taking a drive rather than by taking a walk cause harm? In particular, do the additional carbon emissions caused by such a decision make anyone worse off? Recently several philosophers have argued that the answer is no, and on this basis have gone on to claim that act-consequentialism cannot provide a moral reason for individuals to voluntarily reduce their emissions. The reasoning typically consists of two steps. First, the effect of individual emissions on the (...)
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  7.  63
    Charles Goodman (2008). Consequentialism, Agent-Neutrality, and Mahāyāna Ethics. Philosophy East and West 58 (1):17-35.
    : What kinds of comparisons can legitimately be made between Mahāyāna Buddhism and Western ethical theories? Mahāyānists aspire to alleviate the suffering, promote the happiness, and advance the moral perfection of all sentient beings. This aspiration is best understood as expressing a form of universalist consequentialism. Many Indian Mahāyāna texts seem committed to claims about agent-neutrality that imply consequentialism and are not compatible with virtue ethics. Within the Mahāyāna tradition, there is some diversity of views: Asaṅga seems to hold a (...)
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  8.  35
    Charles Goodman (2010). Ethics in Indian and Tibetan Buddhism. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  9.  9
    Charles Goodman (2004). The Treasury of Metaphysics and the Physical World. Philosophical Quarterly 54 (216):389 - 401.
    Most modern analytic philosophers have ignored works of Indian philosophy such as Vasubandhu's 'Treasury of Metaphysics'. This neglect is unjustified. The account of the nature of the physical world given in the 'Treasury' is a one-category ontology of dharmas, which are simple, momentary tropes. They include basic physical tropes, the most fundamental level of the physical world, as well as higher-level tropes, including sensible properties such as colours, which are known as derived form. I argue that the relationship between the (...)
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  10.  62
    Charles Goodman (2009). Analytical Buddhism: The Two-Tiered Illusion of Self. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 87 (1):159 – 162.
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  11.  4
    Charles Goodman (2003). Merricks, Trenton. Objects and Persons. Review of Metaphysics 56 (3):667-668.
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  12.  18
    Charles Goodman (2008). Bhāvaviveka's Arguments for Emptiness. Asian Philosophy 18 (2):167-184.
    In defending the teaching of emptiness, Bh?vaviveka offers some very strange arguments, which initially may appear so weak that we may be hard pressed to understand how anyone could endorse them. To make sense of these passages, it is helpful to compare them to an argument found in the writings of the Naiy?yika Uddyotakara. These arguments have a certain formal feature which makes them count as valid from the point of view of the rules and norms of some forms of (...)
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  13.  6
    Charles A. Goodman (forthcoming). Review: Richard Sorabji, Gandhi and the Stoics: Modern Experiments on Ancient Values. [REVIEW] Philosophical Explorations.
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  14.  19
    Charles Goodman (2008). Bhvaviveka's Arguments for Emptiness. Asian Philosophy 18 (2):167 – 184.
    In defending the teaching of emptiness, Bh vaviveka offers some very strange arguments, which initially may appear so weak that we may be hard pressed to understand how anyone could endorse them. To make sense of these passages, it is helpful to compare them to an argument found in the writings of the Naiy yika Uddyotakara. These arguments have a certain formal feature which makes them count as valid from the point of view of the rules and norms of some (...)
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  15.  4
    Adam Blatner, George Lucas, Marcus Clayton, Ed Towne, Chuck Krecz & Charles Goodman (1998). Myers Discussion. The Personalist Forum 14 (2):191-198.
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  16.  2
    Don Viney, Adam Blatner, Marcus Clayton, Charles Goodman, Ed Towne & Robert Kane (1998). Viney Discussion. The Personalist Forum 14 (2):239-245.
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  17.  8
    Charles Goodman (2007). Review of Bindu Puri, Heiko Sievers (Eds.), Reason, Morality, and Beauty: Essays on the Philosophy of Immanuel Kant. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2007 (8).
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  18.  7
    Charles Goodman (2006). Review of Bimal Matilal, Epistemology, Logic, and Grammar in Indian Philosophical Analysis. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2006 (5).
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  19. Charles Goodman (2009). Consequences of Compassion: An Interpretation and Defense of Buddhist Ethics. Oxford University Press Usa.
    To many Westerners, the most appealing teachings of the Buddhist tradition pertain to ethics. Many readers have drawn inspiration from Buddhism's emphasis on compassion, nonviolence, and tolerance, its concern for animals, and its models of virtue and self-cultivation. There has been, however, controversy and confusion about which Western ethical theories resemble Buddhist views and in what respects. In this book, Charles Goodman illuminates the relations between Buddhist concepts and Western ethical theories. Every version of Buddhist ethics, says Goodman, takes the (...)
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  20. Charles Goodman (2014). Consequences of Compassion: An Interpretation and Defense of Buddhist Ethics. OUP Usa.
    This book examines the theoretical structure of Buddhist accounts of morality, defends them against objections, and discusses their implications for free will, the justification of punishment, and other issues.
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  21. Charles A. Goodman (2014). Sorabji, Richard.Gandhi and the Stoics: Modern Experiments on Ancient Values.Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2012. Pp. 224. $35.00. [REVIEW] Ethics 124 (2):436-440.
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