Search results for 'Charles Joseph Biederman' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Charles Joseph Biederman (1948). Art as the Evolution of Visual Knowledge. Red Wing, Minn..score: 870.0
     
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  2. Charles Biederman & David Bohm (1999). Bohm-Biederman Correspondence: Creativity in Art and Science. Routledge.score: 660.0
    "It was sheer chance that I encountered David Bohm's writing in 1958 ... I knew nothing about him. What struck me about his work and prompted my initial letter was his underlying effort to seek for some larger sense of reality, which seemed a very humanized search." - Charles Biederman, from the foreword of the book This book marks the beginning of a four thousand page correspondence between Charles Biederman, founder of Constructivism in the 1930s, and (...)
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  3. Roberto Joseph, Patrick Jenlink, Charles Reigeluth, Alison Carr-Chelman & Laurie Nelson (2002). Banathy's Influence on the Guidance System for Transforming Education. World Futures 58 (5 & 6):379 – 394.score: 240.0
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  4. David BÖHM, Charles Biederman, Correspondence Volume One, Luc Borot & James Harrington (1999). ARIEW Roger, John Cottingham and Tom Sorell (Eds): Descartes' Medi. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 7 (2):389-394.score: 240.0
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  5. David Charles (1999). Aristotle on Well-Being and Intellectual Contemplation: David Charles. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 73 (1):205–223.score: 150.0
    [David Charles] Aristotle, it appears, sometimes identifies well-being (eudaimonia) with one activity (intellectual contemplation), sometimes with several, including ethical virtue. I argue that this appearance is misleading. In the Nicomachean Ethics, intellectual contemplation is the central case of human well-being, but is not identical with it. Ethically virtuous activity is included in human well-being because it is an analogue of intellectual contemplation. This structure allows Aristotle to hold that while ethically virtuous activity is valuable in its own right, the (...)
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  6. Matthew Walhout (2010). Looking to Charles Taylor and Joseph Rouse for Best Practices in Science and Religion. Zygon 45 (3):558-574.score: 144.0
    People discussing science and religion usually frame their conversations in terms of essentialist assumptions about science, assumptions requiring the existence (but not the specification) of criteria according to which science can be distinguished from other forms of inquiry. However, criteria functioning at a level of generality appropriate to such discussions may not exist at all. Essentialist assumptions may be avoided if science is understood within a broader context of human practices. In a philosophy of practices, to label a practice as (...)
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  7. Sébastien Charles (2002). Berkeley's Principles and Dialogues. Background Source Materials Charles J. McCracken Et Ian C. Tipton Collection «Cambridge Philosophical Texts in Context» Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 2000, X, 300 P. [REVIEW] Dialogue 41 (04):807-.score: 120.0
  8. H. W. B. Joseph (1938). Order and Life. By Joseph Needham, Fellow of Gonville and Caius College, and Sir William Dunn Reader in Biochemistry, Cambridge. (London: Cambridge University Press. 1936. Pp. X + 178. Price 8s. 6d. Net.). [REVIEW] Philosophy 13 (49):93-.score: 120.0
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  9. S. Charles (forthcoming). Session of the Charles S. Peirce Society. Semiotics.score: 120.0
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  10. Gary Richmond & Ben Udell (2014). Joseph Ransdell and the Communicational Process of Philosophy. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society: A Quarterly Journal in American Philosophy 49 (4):457-466.score: 96.0
    Joseph Morton Ransdell left a record of experimentation with the communicational process of philosophy from 1992 to his passing in 2010. This record includes the Arisbe website and the peirce-l e-forum and its archives, of which the earliest are not on the Internet, but may yet be recovered and made available. Philosophy’s communication process, and the possibility of creating and developing a telecommunity, as Ransdell called it, were among his chief theoretical and practical interests. Such interests were focused in (...)
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  11. Richard Bellon (2006). Joseph Hooker Takes a "Fixed Post": Transmutation and the "Present Unsatisfactory State of Systematic Botany", 1844-1860. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 39 (1):1 - 39.score: 90.0
    Joseph Hooker first learned that Charles Darwin believed in the transmutation of species in 1844. For the next 14 years, Hooker remained a "nonconsenter" to Darwin's views, resolving to keep the question of species origin "subservient to Botany instead of Botany to it, as must be the true relation." Hooker placed particular emphasis on the need for any theory of species origin to support the broad taxonomic delimitation of species, a highly contentious issue. His always provisional support for (...)
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  12. Charles C. Hsu (1994). Neural Network Models for Chaotic-Fuzzy Information Processing Harold Szu, Joe Garcia, G. Rogers, Lotfi Zadeh*/NSWC, Silver Spring MD 20903 Charles C. Hsu, Joseph DeWitte, Jr., Gyu Moon*, Desa Gobovic, Mona Zaghloul EE&CS GWU, Wash. DC 20052* Dept. Of Electronics, Hallym Univ., Choonchun, Korea. [REVIEW] In Karl H. Pribram (ed.), Origins: Brain and Self-Organization. Lawrence Erlbaum. 435.score: 78.0
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  13. Charles Morerod (2013). Les références de Charles Journet à Matthias Joseph Scheeben. Nova Et Vetera 88 (1):45-62.score: 78.0
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  14. Charles T. Wood (1985). Dictionary of the Middle Ages, 1: Aachen–Augustinism; 2: Augustinus Triumphus–Byzantine Literature; 3: Cabala–Crimea; 4: Croatia–Family Sagas, Icelandic; 5: Famine in the Icelandic World–Groote, Geert. Joseph R. Strayer, Editor-in-Chief. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, for the American Council of Learned Societies, 1982–1985. Illustrated. 1: Pp. Xix, 661. 2: Pp. Xiv, 525. 3: Pp. Xiv, 680. 4: Pp. Xiv, 619. 5: Pp. Xiv, 681. $70 Per Volume.Joseph Dahmus, Dictionary of Medieval Civilization. New York: Macmillan; London: Collier Macmillan, 1984. Pp. Viii, 700. $60. [REVIEW] Speculum 60 (4):967-971.score: 78.0
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  15. Charles T. Wood (1991). Dictionary of the Middle Ages, 6: Grosseteste, Robert—Italian Literature; 7: Italian Renaissance—Mabinogi; 8: Macbeth—Mystery Plays; 9: Mystery Religions—Poland; 10: Polemics—Scandinavia; 11: Scandinavian Languages—Textiles, Islamic; 12: Thaddeus Legend—Zwart Cnocc, 13: Index. Joseph R. Strayer, Editor-in-Chief. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, for the American Council of Learned Societies, 1985–1989. Illustrated. 6: Pp. Xv, 670. 7: Pp. Xvii, 706. 8: Pp. Xv, 663. 9: Pp. Xvii, 731. 10: Pp. Xvii ... [REVIEW] Speculum 66 (1):147-149.score: 78.0
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  16. Jim Endersby (2011). A Life More Ordinary: The Dull Life but Interesting Times of Joseph Dalton Hooker. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 44 (4):611 - 631.score: 72.0
    The life of Joseph Dalton Hooker (1817-1911) provides an invaluable lens through which to view mid-Victorian science. A biographical approach makes it clear that some well-established narratives about this period need revising. For example, Hooker's career cannot be considered an example of the professionalisation of the sciences, given the doubtful respectability of being paid to do science and his reliance on unpaid collectors with pretensions to equal scientific and/or social status. Nor was Hooker's response to Darwin's theories either straightforward (...)
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  17. H. D. Lewis (1960). Lessing's Theological Writings. Selections in Translation with an Introductory Essay by B. D. Henry Chadwick (London: Adam and Charles Black, 1956. Pp. 110. Price 8s. 6d.)Confessions of an Inquiring Spirit by S. T. Coleridge. Reprinted From the Third Edition 1853 with the Introduction by Joseph Henry Green and the Note by Sara Coleridge. Edited with an Introductory Note by H. St. J. Hart, B.D. (London: Adam and Charles Black, 1956. Pp. 118. Price 8s. 6d.)The Natural History of Religion by David Hume. Edited with an Introduction by H. E. Root. (London: Adam and Charles Black, 1956. Pp. 76. Price 6s. 6d.). [REVIEW] Philosophy 35 (132):83-.score: 72.0
  18. John Pollard (2011). Vatican Secret Diplomacy: Joseph P. Hurley and Pope Pius XII. By Charles R. Gallagher, S.J. Heythrop Journal 52 (3):532-533.score: 72.0
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  19. L. W. Sumner (1977). Negativities: The Limits of Life. By Joseph Margolis. Columbus. Ohio: Charles E. Merrill Publishing Company. 1975. Pp. Vii, 166. [REVIEW] Dialogue 16 (02):348-352.score: 72.0
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  20. Ninian Smart (1971). Mircea Eliade. The Quest: History and Meaning in Religion. Pp. 180 (Chicago: The University of Chicago Press, 1969). 45s.Myths and Symbols: Studies in Honor of Mircea Eliade. Edited by Joseph Kitagawa and Charles H. Long with the Collaboration of Jerald C. Brauer and Marshall G. S. Hodson. Pp. 438 (Chicago: The University of Chicago Press, 1969). 90s. [REVIEW] Religious Studies 7 (1):77.score: 72.0
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  21. R. C. Zaehner (1969). Joseph M. Kitagawa (Ed.) with the Collaboration of Mircea Eliade and Charles H. Long. The History of Religions. Pp. Xii + 264. (Chicago and London, The University of Chicago Press, 1967.) $6.95 Net. [REVIEW] Religious Studies 4 (2):306.score: 72.0
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  22. Randall R. Dipert (1995). Review: Joseph Brent, Charles Sanders Peirce. A Life. [REVIEW] Journal of Symbolic Logic 60 (1):348-352.score: 72.0
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  23. J. J. Jacobs (1994). Joseph J. Jacobs on Alternative Medicine and the National Institutes of Health. Interview by Thomasine Kushner and Charles MacKay. [REVIEW] Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics: Cq: The International Journal of Healthcare Ethics Committees 3 (3):442.score: 72.0
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  24. George P. Klubertanz (1966). "Moral Guides to Modern Reading," by Charles G. McManus, S.J., and M. Joseph Costelloe, S.J. The Modern Schoolman 43 (3):318-318.score: 72.0
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  25. James K. Farge (2001). Joseph Charles Wey, CSB (1910-2000). Mediaeval Studies 63 (1):vii - ix.score: 72.0
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  26. Claude Gagnon (1981). Scolastique, certitude et recherche; en hommage à Louis-Marie Régis, sous la direction d'Ernest Joós, Montréal, Les Éditions Bellarmin, 1980, 211 p. Ont participé Marie-Dominique Chenu, Étienne Gilson, Dominique Dubarle, Louis-Bertrand Geiger, Joseph Owens, Venant Cauchy, Ernest Joós, Charles Murin, Albert-M. Landry.Scolastique, certitude et recherche; en hommage à Louis-Marie Régis, sous la direction d'Ernest Joós, Montréal, Les Éditions Bellarmin, 1980, 211 p. Ont participé Marie-Dominique Chenu, Étienne Gilson, Dominique Dubarle, Louis-Bertrand Geiger, Joseph Owens, Venant Cauchy, Ernest Joós, Charles Murin, Albert-M. Landry. [REVIEW] Philosophiques 8 (1):199-202.score: 72.0
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  27. Grammaticalization by Paul J. Hopper, Elizabeth Closs Traugott & Frantisek Lichtenberk (1994). HOPPER, PAUL J., and SANDRA A. THOMPSON. 1984. The Discourse Basis for Lexical Categories in Universal Grammar. Lg. 60.703-52. STEELE, SUSAN M. 1978. The Category AUX as a Language Universal. Universals of Human Language, Vol. By Joseph Greenberg, Charles Ferguson, and Edith Moravcsik, 7-45. Stanford: Stanford University Press. [REVIEW] In Stephen Everson (ed.), Language. Cambridge University Press.score: 72.0
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  28. Robert Jewell (1988). Joseph Agassi and Ian Charles Jarvie, Eds., Rationality: The Critical View Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 8 (4):119-121.score: 72.0
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  29. David Philip Miller (1981). The Sheep and Wool Correspondence of Sir Joseph Banks 1781-182O Ed. By Harold B. Carter; Sir Joseph Banks. 18th Century Explorer, Botanist and Entrepreneur by Charles Lyte. [REVIEW] History of Science 19:284-292.score: 72.0
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  30. Catherine Legg (2014). “The Meaning of a Thought is Altogether Something Virtual”: Joseph Ransdell and His Legacy. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 49 (4):451-456,.score: 60.0
    Joseph Ransdell (1931–2010), who received his Ph.D in philosophy from Columbia University in 1966, where he was advised by Sidney Morgenbesser, and spent most of his career at Texas Tech University, offered an original and focused challenge to academic philosophy at the end of the Second Millennium. His guiding philosophical passion was understanding how communication might best encourage and support truth seeking. This introduction to a special edition of the Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society which is (...)
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  31. S. Matthew Liao & Adam Etinson (2012). Political and Naturalistic Conceptions of Human Rights: A False Polemic? Journal of Moral Philosophy 9 (3):327-352.score: 48.0
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  32. Lucy Ransdell (2014). On Joseph Ransdell. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 49 (4):449-450,.score: 30.0
    My father would have loved the idea of me writing this introduction on behalf of my family, a task which is, to be frank, a little intimidating, given this audience that he held in such high esteem. My father’s mind could take him anywhere, to many places where—especially in the last year of his life—his body could not. Anyone lucky enough to have conversed with him knows that with Dr. Joseph Ransdell (Joe to many, and Dad to his daughters), (...)
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  33. Joseph Brent (1993). Charles Sanders Peirce: A Life. History and Philosophy of Logic 14 (2):531-538.score: 30.0
    Charles Sanders Peirce was born in September 1839 and died five months before the guns of August 1914. He is perhaps the most important mind the United States has ever produced. He made significant contributions throughout his life as a mathematician, astronomer, chemist, geodesist, surveyor, cartographer, metrologist, engineer, and inventor. He was a psychologist, a philologist, a lexicographer, a historian of science, a lifelong student of medicine, and, above all, a philosopher, whose special fields were logic and semiotics. He (...)
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  34. Charles Joseph Kowalski & Adam Joel Mrdjenovich (2013). Patient Preference Clinical Trials: Why and When They Will Sometimes Be Preferred. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 56 (1):18-35.score: 28.0
    David Sackett and Jack Wennberg have each introduced and developed ideas and methods that have had major impacts on how we think about and perform clinical research. Sackett is best known for his work in Evidence-Based Medicine (Sackett et al. 1997); Wennberg, upon noting wide geographic (and other) variations in best practices for the same conditions, stressed the importance of comparative effectiveness in clinical decision-making (Wennberg et al. 1993). When these two collaborated in an editorial about the current state of (...)
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  35. Charles Joseph McFadden (1946). Medical Ethics for Nurses. Philadelphia, F. A. Davis Company.score: 28.0
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  36. Charles Joseph Tissot (1877). La Libye d'Hérodote (Pl. XI, XII) (Cf. P. 264). Bulletin de Correspondance Hellénique 1 (1):265-273.score: 28.0
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  37. Charles Joseph Kowalski (2013). When Ethics Precludes Randomization: Put Prospective, Matched-Pair Observational Studies to Work. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 56 (2):184-197.score: 28.0
    In a recent paper in this journal, John Worrall (2008) used the example of a series of trials involving extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO), a technology for the treatment of respiratory failure in newborns, to illustrate the relationship between ethics and epistemology in medical research. One of the issues considered was whether or not it was ethical to perform a particular clinical trial at all, and he showed clearly that the answer was intimately related to epistemological judgments about the weight to (...)
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  38. Charles Joseph Barker (1946). The Way of Life. London, Lutterworth Press.score: 28.0
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  39. Charles Joseph McFadden (1967). Medical Ethics. Philadelphia, F. A. Davis Co..score: 28.0
     
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  40. Charles Joseph Tissot (1882). Antiquités d'Eski-Zaghra. Bulletin de Correspondance Hellénique 6 (1):177-186.score: 28.0
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  41. Joseph Shieber (2013). Toward a Truly Social Epistemology: Babbage, the Division of Mental Labor, and the Possibility of Socially Distributed Warrant. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 86 (2):266-294.score: 24.0
    In what follows, I appeal to Charles Babbage’s discussion of the division of mental labor to provide evidence that—at least with respect to the social acquisition, storage, retrieval, and transmission of knowledge—epistemologists have, for a broad range of phenomena of crucial importance to actual knowers in their epistemic practices in everyday life, failed adequately to appreciate the significance of socially distributed cognition. If the discussion here is successful, I will have demonstrated that a particular presumption widely held within the (...)
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  42. Jeremy Waldron, The Core of the Case Against Judicial Review.score: 24.0
    author. University Professor in the School of Law, Columbia University. (From July 2006, Professor of Law, New York University.) Earlier versions of this Essay were presented at the Colloquium in Legal and Social Philosophy at University College London, at a law faculty workshop at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, and at a constitutional law conference at Harvard Law School. I am particularly grateful to Ronald Dworkin, Ruth Gavison, and Seana Shiffrin for their formal comments on those occasions and also to (...)
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  43. Jaime Nubiola (2008). C. S. Peirce and G. M. Searle: The Hoax of Infallibilism. Cognitio 9 (1):73-84.score: 24.0
    George M. Searle (1839-1918) and Charles S. Peirce worked together in the Coast Survey and the Harvard Observatory during the decade of 1860: both scientists were assistants of Joseph Winlock, the director of the Observatory. When in 1868 George, a convert to Catholicism, left to enter the Paulist Fathers, he was replaced by his brother Arthur Searle. George was ordained as a priest in 1871, was a lecturer of Mathematics and Astronomy at the Catholic University of America, and (...)
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  44. Michael Krausz (ed.) (2010). Relativism: A Contemporary Anthology. Columbia University Press.score: 24.0
    The thirty-three essays in <I>Relativism: A Contemporary Anthology</I> grapple with one of the most intriguing, enduring, and far-reaching philosophical problems of our age. Relativism comes in many varieties. It is often defined as the belief that truth, goodness, or beauty is relative to some context or reference frame, and that no absolute standards can adjudicate between competing reference frames. Michael Krausz's anthology captures the significance and range of relativistic doctrines, rehearsing their virtues and vices and reflecting on a spectrum of (...)
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  45. Lynsey Wolter (2010). Teaching & Learning Guide For: Demonstratives in Philosophy and Linguistics. Philosophy Compass 5 (1):108-111.score: 24.0
    Demonstrative noun phrases (e.g. this; that guy over there ) are intimately connected to the context of use in that their reference is determined by demonstrations and/or the speaker's intentions. The semantics of demonstratives therefore has important implications not only for theories of reference, but for questions about how information from the context interacts with formal semantics. First treated by Kaplan as directly referential , demonstratives have recently been analyzed as quantifiers by King, and the choice between these two approaches (...)
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  46. Moses Maimonides (1975/1983). Ethical Writings of Maimonides. Dover Publications.score: 24.0
    Here are the most significant ethical writings of the 12th-century philosopher, physician, and master of rabbinical literature—newly translated from the original sources by noted Maimonides scholars Raymond L. Weiss and Charles E. Butterworth. Among these are the first English versions of Eight Chapters and the Letter to Joseph. Other selections include Laws Concerning Character Traits, Treatise on the Art of Logic, and gleanings from Maimonides’ medical writings. Introduction. Notes.
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  47. Bruce Kuklick (2001). A History of Philosophy in America, 1720-2000. Clarendon Press.score: 24.0
    Ranging from Joseph Bellamy to Hilary Putnam, and from early New England Divinity Schools to contemporary university philosophy departments, historian Bruce Kuklick recounts the story of the growth of philosophical thinking in the United States. Readers will explore the thought of early American philosphers such as Jonathan Edwards and John Witherspoon and will see how the political ideas of Benjamin Franklin, Thomas Paine and Thomas Jefferson influenced philosophy in colonial America. Kuklick discusses The Transcendental Club (members Henry David Thoreau, (...)
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  48. Albert Mosley, Science and Technology in Contemporary African Philosophy.score: 24.0
    The complex problems facing developing countries have often been attributed to the tendency of their people to maintain traditional beliefs and practices. Many contemporary philosophers have criticized traditional thought for failing to match the levels of efficiency and effectiveness achieved by modern science. However, other contemporary philosophers have suggested that modern science embodies tendencies that are as likely to exacerbate as relieve the problems of the developing world. I conclude that philosophers must be as wary of modern practices and beliefs (...)
     
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  49. James Fieser (ed.) (2001). Early Responses to Hume's Writings on Religion. Thoemmes Press.score: 24.0
    In the past 250 years, David Hume probably had a greater impact on the field of philosophy of religion than any other single philosopher. He relentlessly attacked the standard proofs for God's existence, traditional notions of God's nature and divine governance, the connection between morality and religion, and the rationality of belief in miracles. He also advanced radical theories of the origin of religious ideas, grounding such notions in human psychology rather than in divine reality. In the last decade of (...)
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  50. Amy Klemm Verbos, Joseph A. Gerard, Paul R. Forshey, Charles S. Harding & Janice S. Miller (2007). The Positive Ethical Organization: Enacting a Living Code of Ethics and Ethical Organizational Identity. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 76 (1):17 - 33.score: 24.0
    A vision of a living code of ethics is proposed to counter the emphasis on negative phenomena in the study of organizational ethics. The living code results from the harmonious interaction of authentic leadership, five key organizational processes (attraction–selection–attrition, socialization, reward systems, decision-making and organizational learning), and an ethical organizational culture (characterized by heightened levels of ethical awareness and a positive climate regarding ethics). The living code is the cognitive, affective, and behavioral manifestation of an ethical organizational identity. We draw (...)
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