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Profile: Charles R. Twardy (George Mason University)
  1. Charles R. Twardy, Hume, Newton, & Maclaurin.
    Note to readers: Originally I thought there was a stronger link between Maclaurin and Hume, however I now think it clear that Hume is not taking his mechanics out of Maclaurin’s Account. Although I still have found Maclaurin useful in interpreting Hume, I suspect this draft suffers somewhat from ambivalence. There are still similarities, and possible avenues of influence, arguing that Hume was not ignorant of the new mechanics, but it also becomes clear that he did not understand it: although (...)
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  2. Charles R. Twardy, Maya Cosmology and Philosophy of Science.
    Part of our fascination with the Maya can be attributed to the fact that they were literate . . . that is, the Classic Maya possessed a visible language that consisted of letters and a grammar, and one of the products of their literacy was the book. (Aveni 1992b, p.3).
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  3. Charles R. Twardy (2011). Local Complexity Adaptable Trajectory Partitioning Via Minimum Message Length. In 18th IEEE International Conference on Image Processing. IEEE.
    We present a minimum message length (MML) framework for trajectory partitioning by point selection, and use it to automatically select the tolerance parameter ε for Douglas-Peucker partitioning, adapting to local trajectory complexity. By examining a range of ε for synthetic and real trajectories, it is easy to see that the best ε does vary by trajectory, and that the MML encoding makes sensible choices and is robust against Gaussian noise. We use it to explore the identification of micro-activities within a (...)
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  4. Charles R. Twardy (2011). 18th IEEE International Conference on Image Processing. IEEE.
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  5. Charles R. Twardy & Kevin B. Korb (2011). Actual Causation by Probabilistic Active Paths. Philosophy of Science 78 (5):900-913.
    We present a probabilistic extension to active path analyses of token causation (Halpern & Pearl 2001, forthcoming; Hitchcock 2001). The extension uses the generalized notion of intervention presented in (Korb et al. 2004): we allow an intervention to set any probability distribution over the intervention variables, not just a single value. The resulting account can handle a wide range of examples. We do not claim the account is complete --- only that it fills an obvious gap in previous active-path approaches. (...)
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  6. Lorraine Code, Struan Jacobs, Deepanwita Dasgupta, Charles R. Twardy & Rafaela Hillerbrand (2008). Book Reviews. [REVIEW] International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 22 (1):97 – 114.
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  7. Toby Handfield, Charles R. Twardy, Kevin B. Korb & Graham Oppy (2008). The Metaphysics of Causal Models: Where's the Biff? Erkenntnis 68 (2):149-68.
    This paper presents an attempt to integrate theories of causal processes—of the kind developed by Wesley Salmon and Phil Dowe—into a theory of causal models using Bayesian networks. We suggest that arcs in causal models must correspond to possible causal processes. Moreover, we suggest that when processes are rendered physically impossible by what occurs on distinct paths, the original model must be restricted by removing the relevant arc. These two techniques suffice to explain cases of late preëmption and other cases (...)
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  8. Charles R. Twardy & Kevin B. Korb (2004). A Criterion of Probabilistic Causation. Philosophy of Science 71 (3):241-262.
    The investigation of probabilistic causality has been plagued by a variety of misconceptions and misunderstandings. One has been the thought that the aim of the probabilistic account of causality is the reduction of causal claims to probabilistic claims. Nancy Cartwright (1979) has clearly rebutted that idea. Another ill-conceived idea continues to haunt the debate, namely the idea that contextual unanimity can do the work of objective homogeneity. It cannot. We argue that only objective homogeneity in combination with a causal interpretation (...)
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  9. Charles R. Twardy, Kevin B. Korb, Ole Rogeberg, Cristina Bicchieri, John Duffy, Gil Tolle, P. D. Magnus, Craig Callender, Joseph F. Hanna & Paul Skokowski (2004). 1. A Criterion of Probabilistic Causation A Criterion of Probabilistic Causation (Pp. 241-262). Philosophy of Science 71 (3).
     
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