Search results for 'Charles S. Chien' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. John Cherry, Monle Lee & Charles S. Chien (2003). A Cross-Cultural Application of a Theoretical Model of Business Ethics: Bridging the Gap Between Theory and Data. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 44 (4):359 - 376.score: 960.0
    Hunt and Vitell''s General Theory (1992) is used in a cross-cultural comparison of U.S. and Taiwanese business practitioners. Results indicate that Taiwanese practitioners exhibit lower perceptions of an ethical issue in a scenario based on bribery, as well as milder deontological evaluations and ethical judgments relative to their U.S. counterparts. In addition, Taiwan respondents showed higher likelihood of making the payment. Several of the paths between variables in the theory are confirmed in both U.S. and Taiwan samples, with summary data (...)
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  2. Chi-Hui Chien (1990). "Theft's Way" a Comparative Study of Chuang Tzu's Tao and Derridean Trace. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 17 (1):31-49.score: 360.0
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  3. Raphael Carl Lee & Anna Chien (2005). The Doctor's Plague: Germs, Childbed Fever, and the Strange Story of Ignac Semmelweis (Review). Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 48 (4):616-618.score: 360.0
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  4. Jui-Pi Chien (2011). Can Saussure's Orangery Manuscripts Shed New Light on Biosemiotics? Semiotica 2011 (185):51-77.score: 360.0
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  5. Jui-Pi Chien (2014). Fashionable yet Strategic Similarities: Diego Velázquez's Creative Consciousness Seen Through Saussurean-Hegelian Composite Approach. Semiotica 2014 (202).score: 360.0
    Name der Zeitschrift: Semiotica Jahrgang: 2014 Heft: 202 Seiten: 439-458.
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  6. Stuart Sargent & Huang T'ing-Chien (forthcoming). Huang T'ing-Chien's" Incense of Awareness": Poems of Exchange, Poems of Enlightenment. Journal of the American Oriental Society.score: 126.0
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  7. Arnold Chien (2008). Scalar Implicature and Contrastive Explanation. Synthese 161 (1):47 - 66.score: 120.0
    I argue for a subsumption of any version of Grice’s first quantity maxim posited to underlie scalar implicature, by developing the idea of implicature recovery as a kind of explanatory inference, as e.g. in science. I take the applicable model to be contrastive explanation, while following van Fraassen’s analysis of explanation as an answer to a why-question. A scalar implicature is embedded in such an answer, one that meets two probabilistic constraints: the probability of the answer, and ‘favoring’. I argue (...)
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  8. Jui-Pi Chien (2004). Schema as Both the Key to and the Puzzle of Life. Sign Systems Studies 32 (1-2):187-207.score: 120.0
    Jakob von Uexküll’s problematic is manifested in his paradoxical portraiture of form within the plan of nature: the one a sensual schema and the other a transsensual ideal form. At first sight, Uexküll’s belief in the Platonic and the Reformational notions of the immobile becoming of form seems to be a resignation from the heated debates among his contemporary materialists, vitalists, dynamists, and evolutionists. However, in terms of the Kantian subjective teleology, Uexküll’s appropriation of the ancient philosophy reinstates the invisible, (...)
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  9. A. J. Chien (1996). Why the Mind May Not Be Modular. Minds and Machines 6 (1):1-32.score: 120.0
    Fodor argued that in contrast to input systems which are informationally encapsulated, general intelligence is unencapsulated and hence non-modular; for this reason, he suggested, prospects for understanding it are not bright. It is argued that an additional property, primitive functionality, is required for non-modularity. A functionally primitive computational model for quantifier scoping, limited to some scoping influences, is then motivated, and an implementation described. It is argued that only such a model can be faithful to intuitive scope preferences. But it (...)
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  10. Wing-Han Hara (1993). Between Individuality and Universality: An Explication of Chuanc-Tzu's Theses of Chien-Tu and ch'I-Wu. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 20 (1):87-99.score: 120.0
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  11. C. C. Chang (1971). Review: Kao Hêng-San, Kuan-Yü Łoś Ho Suszko "Lun Mu-Hsing Ti K'uo-Chung (IV)" I Wen Chih Jo-Kan Hsiu-Cheng Ho Chien-Hua (Some Corrections and Simplifications of Łoś and Suszko's "On the Extending of Models (IV)"). [REVIEW] Journal of Symbolic Logic 36 (2):339-339.score: 120.0
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  12. R. Bruce Elder (2009). Deception as Aggression : Salvador Dali and Luis Buñuel's Un Chien Andalou. In Leslie Anne Boldt-Irons, Corrado Federici & Ernesto Virgulti (eds.), Disguise, Deception, Trompe-L'oeil: Interdisciplinary Perspectives. Peter Lang.score: 120.0
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  13. Candace Yang (forthcoming). Looking at the Surreal with Eyes Slit by Terror: Luis Buñuel's Un Chien Andalou and September 11. Philosophy of Music Education Review 10 (2):132-135.score: 120.0
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  14. Gregory Minissale (2010). Beyond Internalism and Externalism: Husserl and Sartre's Image Consciousness in Hitchcock And. Buñuel. Film-Philosophy 14 (1):174-201.score: 54.0
    Husserl and Sartre’s analyses of mental imagery and some of the latest cognitive research on vision provide a framework for understanding a number of films by Hitchcock (Psycho and Rear Window) and Buñuel (Un Chien Andalou), films which similarly probe the subtleties and uses of mental imagery. One of the many ways to enjoy these films is to see them as explorations of visual phenomenology; they allow us to enact, as well as reflect upon, mental images as part of (...)
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  15. Chien-Hsing Ho (2010). Nāgārjuna's Critique of Language. Asian Philosophy 20 (2):159-174.score: 42.0
    This essay attempts to provide a systematic reconstruction of Nāgārjuna's philosophical thought by understanding it as a critique of the attachment to linguistic expressions and their referents. We first present an outline of Nāgārjuna's philosophy, centering on such notions as 'dependent origination', 'emptiness' and 'self-nature'. Then we discuss Nāgārjuna's dismissal of a metaphysical use of language, particularly his contention that language can function well without assuming the reality of its referents. We also consider his statement that he has no assertion (...)
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  16. Chien-Hsing Ho (2012). One Name, Infinite Meanings: Jizang's Thought on Meaning and Reference. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 39 (3):436-452.score: 42.0
    Jizang sets forth a hermeneutical theory of “one name, infinite meanings” that proposes four types of interpretation of word meaning to the effect that a nominal word X means X, non-X, the negation of X, and all things whatsoever. In this article, I offer an analysis of the theory, with a view to elucidating Jizang's thought on meaning and reference and considering its contemporary significance. The theory, I argue, may best be viewed as an expedient means for telling us how (...)
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  17. Chien-Hsing Ho (2012). The Nonduality of Speech and Silence: A Comparative Analysis of Jizang’s Thought on Language and Beyond. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 11 (1):1-19.score: 42.0
    Jizang (549−623 CE), the key philosophical exponent of the Sanlun tradition of Chinese Buddhism, based his philosophy considerably on his reading of the works of Nāgārjuna (c.150−250 CE), the founder of the Indian Madhyamaka school. However, although Jizang sought to follow Nāgārjuna closely, there are salient features in his thought on language that are notably absent from Nāgārjuna’s works. In this paper, I present a philosophical analysis of Jizang’s views of the relationship between speech and silence and compare them with (...)
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  18. Chien-Hsing Ho (2013). Ontic Indeterminacy and Paradoxical Language: A Philosophical Analysis of Sengzhao's Linguistic Thought. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 12 (4):505-522.score: 42.0
    For Sengzhao 僧肇 (374−414 CE), a leading Sanlun 三論 philosopher of Chinese Buddhism, things in the world are ontologically indeterminate in that they are devoid of any determinate form or nature. In his view, we should understand and use words provisionally, so that they are not taken to connote the determinacy of their referents. To echo the notion of ontic indeterminacy and indicate the provisionality of language, his main work, the Zhaolun 肇論, abounds in paradoxical expressions. In this essay, I (...)
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  19. Chien-Hsing Ho (forthcoming). The Way of Nonacquisition: Jizang's Philosophy of Ontic Indeterminacy. Hamburg University Press.score: 42.0
    For Jizang (549−623), a prominent philosophical exponent of Chinese Madhyamaka, all things are empty of determinate form or nature. Given anything X, no linguistic item can truly and conclusively be applied to X in the sense of positing a determinate form or nature therein. This philosophy of ontic indeterminacy is connected closely with his notion of the Way (dao), which seems to indicate a kind of ineffable principle of reality. However, Jizang also equates the Way with nonacquisition as a conscious (...)
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  20. Chien-Te Lin (2014). A Buddhist Take on Gilbert Ryle's Theory of Mind. Asian Philosophy 24 (2):178-196.score: 42.0
    Gilbert Ryle?s The Concept of Mind (1949/2002. Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press) is generally considered a landmark in the quest to refute Cartesian dualism. The work contains many inspirational ideas and mainly posits behavioral disposition as the referent of mind in order to refute mind?body dualism. In this article, I show that the Buddhist theory of ?non-self? is also at odds with the belief that a substantial soul exists distinct from the physical body and further point out similarities between (...)
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  21. Dean M. Harris & Chien-Chang Wu (2005). Medical Malpractice in the People's Republic of China: The 2002 Regulation on the Handling of Medical Accidents. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 33 (3):456-477.score: 36.0
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  22. Man-Ying Wang, Chien-Yu Chang & Shou-Yi Su (2011). What's Cooking? – Cognitive Training of Executive Function in the Elderly. Frontiers in Psychology 2.score: 36.0
    Executive function involves the efficient and adaptive engagement of the control processes of updating, shifting and inhibition (Miyake, 2000) to guide behavior toward a goal. It is associated with decrements in many other cognitive functions due to aging (Raz, 2000; West, 1996) with itself particularly vulnerable to the effect of aging (Treitz, Heyder, & Daum, 2007). Cognitive training in the form of structural experience with executive coordination demands exhibited effective enhancement in the elderly (Hertzog, Kramer, Wilson, & Ulman, 2009). The (...)
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  23. Chin-hsing Huang (1995). Philosophy, Philology, and Politics in Eighteenth-Century China: Li Fu and the Lu-Wang School Under the Chʻing. Cambridge University Press.score: 24.0
    This book explains the general intellectual climate of the early Ch'ing period, and the political and cultural characteristics of the Ch'ing regime at the time. Professor Huang brings to life the book's central characters, Li Fu and the three great emperors - K'ang-hsi, Yung-cheng, and Chien-lung - whom he served. Although the author's main concern is to explain the contributions of Li Fu to the Lu-Wang school of Confucianism, he also gives a clearly written account of the Lu-Wang and (...)
     
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  24. Chien-Hsing Ho (2014). Meaning, Understanding, and Knowing-What: An Indian Grammarian Notion of Intuition (Pratibha). Philosophy East and West 64 (2):404-424.score: 12.0
    For Bhartrhari, a fifth-century Indian grammarian-philosopher, all conscious beings—beasts, birds and humans—are capable of what he called pratibha, a flash of indescribable intuitive understanding such that one knows what the present object “means” and what to do with it. Such an understanding, if correct, amounts to a mode of knowing that may best be termed knowing-what, to distinguish it from both knowing-that and knowing-how. This paper attempts to expound Bhartrhari’s conception of pratibha in relation to the notions of meaning, understanding, (...)
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  25. Chien-Hsing Ho (2007). Consciousness and Self-Awareness. Asian Philosophy 17 (3):213 – 230.score: 12.0
    In this paper I propose to inquire into the theory of self-awareness propounded by the two Buddhist epistemologists, Dignaga and Dharmakirti. I first give an outline of the Buddhist notion of consciousness, then deal with the notion of objectual appearance, and finally dwell on the theory itself together with certain arguments in its favor. It is shown that the Buddhists subscribed themselves to the following self-awareness thesis: that our waking consciousness is always pre-reflectively and nonconceptually aware of itself. Adopting an (...)
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  26. Chien-Hsing Ho (2008). The Finger Pointing Toward the Moon: A Philosophical Analysis of the Chinese Buddhist Thought of Reference. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 35 (1):159-177.score: 12.0
    In this essay I attempt a philosophical analysis of the Chinese Buddhist thought of linguistic reference to shed light on how the Buddhist understands the way language refers to an ineffable reality. For this purpose, the essay proceeds in two directions: an enquiry into the linguistic thoughts of Sengzhao (374-414 CE) and Jizang (549-623 CE), two leading Chinese Madhyamika thinkers, and an analysis of the Buddhist simile of a moon-pointing finger. The two approaches respectively constitute the horizontal and vertical axes (...)
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  27. Chien-Hsing Ho (2014). Emptiness as Subject-Object Unity: Sengzhao on the Way Things Truly Are. Routledge.score: 12.0
    Sengzhao (374?−414 CE), a leading Chinese Mādhyamika philosopher, holds that the myriad things are empty, and that they are, at bottom, the same as emptiness qua the way things truly are. In this paper, I distinguish the level of the myriad things from that of the way things truly are and call them, respectively, the ontic and the ontological levels. For Sengzhao, the myriad things at the ontic level are indeterminate and empty, and he equates the way things truly are (...)
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  28. Chien-Hsing Ho (1996). How Not to Avoid Speaking. Journal of Indian Philosophy 24 (5):541-562.score: 12.0
    Mahayana Buddhist philosophers’ attitude toward language is notoriously negative. The transcendental reality is often said to be ineffable. One’s obsession to apprehend the truth through words is an intellectual disease to be cured Attachment to verbal and conceptual proliferation enslaves oneself in the afflictive circle of life and death. Nevertheless, no Buddhist can afford to overlook the significance of language in preaching Buddhist dharmas as well as in day-to-day transactions. The point is not that of keeping silence. Rather, one should (...)
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  29. Kevin Chien-Chang Wu (2011). Deliberative Democracy and Epistemic Humility. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 34 (2):93-94.score: 12.0
    Deliberative democracy is one of the best designs that could facilitate good public policy decision making and bring about epistemic good based on Mercier and Sperber's (M&S's) theory of reasoning. However, three conditions are necessary: (1) an ethic of individual epistemic humility, (2) a pragmatic deflationist definition of truth, and (3) a microscopic framing power analysis during group reasoning.
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  30. Kevin Chien-Chang Wu (2011). Governing Drug Use Through Neurobiological Subject Construction: The Sad Loss of the Sociocultural. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 34 (6):327-328.score: 12.0
    Based on their framework, Müller & Schumann (M&S) propose a staged drug policy that matches well the neoliberal governance scheme. To mend the sad loss of the sociocultural dimension in their model, I propose three such considerations: first, sociocultural interactions with the brain; second, sociocultural context and justice of drug use; and third, sociocultural preparedness for implementing their drug policy.
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  31. Robert Brisart (2011). Husserl et la no ready-made theory : la phénoménologie dans la tradition constructiviste. Bulletin d'Analyse Phénoménologique (1):3-36.score: 8.0
    Dans l?histoire récente de l?art, l?idée du ready-made fut un artifice assez efficace pour montrer que n?importe quel objet déjà manufacturé pouvait être érigé en ?uvre d?art, pourvu qu?on le conçoive et le nomme comme telle. C?était en somme délibérément minimiser toutes les qualités imparties à la matérialité d?un objet d?art pour mieux laisser apparaître la conceptualisation dont procède sa genèse. Je soutiens pour ma part que, dans l?histoire de la philosophie, la théorie du ready-made a en quelque sorte toujours (...)
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