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  1. Anne E. Riggs, Charles W. Kalish & Martha W. Alibali (2014). Property Content Guides Children's Memory for Social Learning Episodes. Cognition 131 (2):243-253.
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  2. Charles W. Kalish, Sunae Kim & Andrew G. Young (2012). How Young Children Learn From Examples: Descriptive and Inferential Problems. Cognitive Science 36 (8):1427-1448.
    Three experiments with preschool- and young school-aged children (N = 75 and 53) explored the kinds of relations children detect in samples of instances (descriptive problem) and how they generalize those relations to new instances (inferential problem). Each experiment initially presented a perfect biconditional relation between two features (e.g., all and only frogs are blue). Additional examples undermined one of the component conditional relations (not all frogs are blue) but supported another (only frogs are blue). Preschool-aged children did not distinguish (...)
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  3. Charles W. Kalish, Timothy T. Rogers, Jonathan Lang & Xiaojin Zhu (2011). Can Semi-Supervised Learning Explain Incorrect Beliefs About Categories? Cognition 120 (1):106-118.
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  4. Charles W. Kalish (2010). How Children Use Examples to Make Conditional Predictions. Cognition 116 (1):1-14.
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  5. Susan B. Perlman, Charles W. Kalish & Seth D. Pollak (2008). The Role of Maltreatment Experience in Children's Understanding of the Antecedents of Emotion. Cognition and Emotion 22 (4):651-670.
  6. Charles W. Kalish & Christopher A. Lawson (2007). Negative Evidence and Inductive Generalisation. Thinking and Reasoning 13 (4):394 – 425.
    How do people use past experience to generalise to novel cases? This paper reports four experiments exploring the significance on one class of past experiences: encounters with negative or contrasting cases. In trying to decide whether all ravens are black, what is the effect of learning about a non-raven that is not black? Two experiments with preschool-aged, young school-aged, and adult participants revealed that providing a negative example in addition to a positive example supports generalisation. Two additional experiments went on (...)
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  7. Daniel R. Ames, Eric D. Knowles, Michael W. Morris, Charles W. Kalish, Andrea D. Rosati & Alison Gopnik (2001). The Social Folk Theorist: Insights From Social and Cultural Psychology on The. In Bertram Malle, L. J. Moses & Dare Baldwin (eds.), Intentions and Intentionality: Foundations of Social Cognition. Mit Press.
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  8. Andrea D. Rosati, Eric D. Knowles, Charles W. Kalish, Alison Gopnik, Daniel R. Ames & Michael W. Morris (2001). The Rocky Road From Acts to Dispositions: Insights for Attribution Theory From Developmental Research on Theories of Mind. In Bertram Malle, L. J. Moses & Dare Baldwin (eds.), Intentions and Intentionality: Foundations of Social Cognition. Mit Press.
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  9. Woo-Kyoung Ahn, Susan A. Gelman, Jennifer A. Amsterlaw, Jill Hohenstein & Charles W. Kalish (2000). Causal Status Effect in Children's Categorization. Cognition 76 (2):B35-B43.
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  10. Woo-Kyoung Ahn, Charles W. Kalish, Douglas L. Medin & Susan A. Gelman (1995). The Role of Covariation Versus Mechanism Information in Causal Attribution. Cognition 54 (3):299-352.
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