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Charlie Lewis [11]Charlie N. Lewis [1]
  1. Charlie Lewis & James Stack (2013). A Mature Second-Person Neuroscience Needs a First-Person (Plural) Developmental Foundation. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 36 (4):428-429.
    Schilbach et al.'s model assumes that the ability to minds is already present in human infants and therefore falls foul of the very intellectualist problems it attempts to avoid. We propose an alternative relational, action-based account, which attempts to grasp how the individual's construction of knowledge develops within interactions.
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  2. Jeremy I. M. Carpendale, Stuart Hammond & Charlie Lewis (2010). The Social Origin and Moral Nature of Human Thinking. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 33 (4):334.
    Knobe's laudable conclusion that we make sense of our social world based on moral considerations requires a development account of human thought and a theoretical framework. We outline a view that such a moral framework must be rooted in social interaction.
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  3. Peter Hull, Ganaps Perianayagam, Muhammad Korim, Charlie Lewis & Stuart Brooks (2009). Patients' Preference for the Timing and Location of Follow‐Up Following Day Case Arthroscopic Knee Surgery – The Results of a Questionnaire. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 15 (2):405-407.
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  4. Charlie Lewis & Jeremy I. M. Carpendale (2009). Carruthers' Marvelous Magical Mindreading Machine. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 32 (2):152-152.
    Carruthers presents an interesting analysis of confabulation and a clear attack on introspection. Yet his theory-based alternative is a mechanistic view of which neglects the fact that social understanding occurs within a network of social relationships. In particular, the role of language in his model is too simple.
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  5. Kevin Muldoon, Charlie Lewis & Norman Freeman (2009). Why Set-Comparison is Vital in Early Number Learning. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 13 (5):203-208.
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  6. Jeremy I. M. Carpendale & Charlie Lewis (2008). Mirroring Cannot Account for Understanding Action. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 31 (1):23-24.
    Susan Hurley's shared circuits model (SCM) rightly begins in action and progresses through a series of layers; but it fails to reach action understanding because it relies on mirroring as a driving force, draws on heavily criticized theories, and neglects the need for shared experience in our grasp of social understanding.
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  7. Andrea Cheshire, Linden J. Ball & Charlie N. Lewis (2008). Analogy as Relational Priming: The Challenge of Self-Reflection. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 31 (4):381-382.
    Despite its strengths, Leech et al.'s model fails to address the important benefits that derive from self-explanation and task feedback in analogical reasoning development. These components encourage explicit, self-reflective processes that do not necessarily link to knowledge accretion. We wonder, therefore, what mechanisms can be included within a connectionist framework to model self-reflective involvement and its beneficial consequences.
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  8. Kevin Muldoon, Charlie Lewis & Norman Freeman (2008). Don't Throw the Baby Out with the Math Water: Why Discounting the Developmental Foundations of Early Numeracy is Premature and Unnecessary. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 31 (6):663-664.
    We see no grounds for insisting that, because the concept natural number is abstract, its foundations must be innate. It is possible to specify domain general learning processes that feed into more abstract concepts of numerical infinity. By neglecting the messiness of children's slow acquisition of arithmetical concepts, Rips et al. present an idealized, unnecessarily insular, view of number development.
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  9. Jeremy Im Carpendale, Charlie Lewis, Ulrich Müller & Timothy P. Racine (2005). Constructing Perspectives in the Social Making of Minds. Interaction Studies 6 (3):341-358.
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  10. Jeremy I. M. Carpendale & Charlie Lewis (2004). Constructing an Understanding of Mind: The Development of Children's Social Understanding Within Social Interaction. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (1):79-96.
    Theories of children's developing understanding of mind tend to emphasize either individualistic processes of theory formation, maturation, or introspection, or the process of enculturation. However, such theories must be able to account for the accumulating evidence of the role of social interaction in the development of social understanding. We propose an alternative account, according to which the development of children's social understanding occurs within triadic interaction involving the child's experience of the world as well as communicative interaction with others about (...)
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  11. Jeremy I. M. Carpendale & Charlie Lewis (2004). Constructing Understanding, with Feeling. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (1):130-141.
    We explore three types of criticisms of our theory on the development of children's social understanding. We reject suggestions that we offer nothing new to traditional theories of development or recent “social” accounts of “theory of mind.” Second, we take the point that there are grounds for improving our account of dyadic interaction in infancy but reject claims that we have not sufficiently accounted for how we incorporate the notions of criteria and structure into the theory. Third, we accept that (...)
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  12. Norman H. Freeman, Cristina Antonucci & Charlie Lewis (2000). Representation of the Cardinality Principle: Early Conception of Error in a Counterfactual Test. Cognition 74 (1):71-89.
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