Search results for 'Charlie Tanksley' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  52
    Charlie Tanksley (2010). The Mereological Constancy of Masses. Philosophical Quarterly 60 (239):343-354.
    It is controversial whether masses (what mass nouns refer to) exist. But on the assumption that they do, here are two uncontroversial facts about them: first, they satisfy a fusion principle which takes any set of masses of kind K and yields a mass fusion of kind K; secondly, a mass must have all and only the same parts at every time at which it exists. These two theses are usually built into the concept 'mass'. I argue that the latter (...)
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  2.  27
    A. Henle Christine, L. Reeve Charlie & E. Pitts Virginia (2010). Stealing Time at Work: Attitudes, Social Pressure, and Perceived Control as Predictors of Time Theft. Journal of Business Ethics 94 (1).
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  3.  18
    William A. Edmundson (forthcoming). Charlie Hebdo Meets Utility Monster. The Critique.
    The Charlie Hebdo massacre in January 2015 and the subsequent attacks of November 13 cast a garish light onto a conundrum at the center of how liberal democracies understand themselves. The Syrian emigrant crisis has added further color. How can a tolerant, liberal political culture tolerate the presence of intolerant, illiberal, sub-cultures while remaining true to its principles of tolerance? The problem falls within the intersection of two developments in the thinking of John Rawls, the great American political philosopher (...)
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  4. Charlie Dunbar Broad (1953). Religion, Philosophy, and Psychical Research : Selected Essays / Charlie Broad. Routledge & K. Paul.
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  5.  10
    Brenda Watson (2016). Belief and Evidence, and How It May Aid Reflection Concerning Charlie Hebdo. Think 15 (42):151-161.
    Starting from support for James's critique of Clifford's dictum, the article argues for holding beliefs, whether secular or religious, firmly but provisionally, remaining open to fresh experience. This consideration prompts reflection on the debate following the attack on Charlie Hebdo. Alternative beliefs were opposing each other with seemingly equal certainty. The justification for insistence on the right to free speech itself requires scrutiny. The article finishes by noting the baleful effects of the intellectual apartheid which has tended to be (...)
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  6.  5
    Moshe Shai Rachmuth (2015). Laughter and the Death of the Comic: Charlie Chaplin's The Circus and Limelight in Light of the Ethics of Emmanuel Levinas. Film-Philosophy 19:15-32.
    Using the work of Emmanuel Levinas, this article sheds light on Charlie Chaplin's The Circus, a piece that so far eluded the critics, despite its immense popularity with theater viewers. I show that it is not Chaplin's lack of inventiveness that makes the Tramp risk his life on the tightrope 'for nothing'. It is, on the contrary, Chaplin's intuitive sense that makes him believe, anticipating Levinas, that it is human and simple for a person to help another for no (...)
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  7.  4
    Neil Cohn (2014). You 'Re a Good Structure, Charlie Brown: The Distribution of Narrative Categories in Comic Strips'. Cognitive Science 38 (7):1317-1359.
    Cohn's (2013) theory of “Visual Narrative Grammar” argues that sequential images take on categorical roles in a narrative structure, which organizes them into hierarchic constituents analogous to the organization of syntactic categories in sentences. This theory proposes that narrative categories, like syntactic categories, can be identified through diagnostic tests that reveal tendencies for their distribution throughout a sequence. This paper describes four experiments testing these diagnostics to provide support for the validity of these narrative categories. In Experiment 1, participants reconstructed (...)
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  8. David L. Smith (2006). The Implicit Soul of Charlie Kaufman's Adaptation. Philosophy and Literature 30 (2):424-435.
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  9. C. Levi-Strauss (1954). Reviews : The Art of Deciphering Symbols (in Four Lessons, to Be Followed or Not to Be Followed): Soogwilis, a Collection of Kwakiutl Indian Designs and Legends by R. Geddes/ Large Toronto: The Ryerson Press, I95i. Pp. 87 and 33 Coloured Plates by Charlie George. /The Lost Language of Symbolism by Harold Bayley N.E., London: William and Norgate, I952. 2 Vols. Pp. IX-375 and Pp. VIII-3,888, I,4i8 Illustrations. / The Cinderella Cycle by Anna Birgitta Rooth Lund: C. W. K. Gleerup, I95i. Pp. 269 and XVI Inserted Recapitulated Pictures. The Life-Giving Myth by A. M. Hocart Edited, with Introduction by Lord Raglan. London: Methuen and Co., I952. Pp. 252. [REVIEW] Diogenes 2 (5):101-108.
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  10. Harry A. Grace (1952). Charlie Chaplin's Films and American Culture Patterns. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 10 (4):353-363.
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  11.  21
    Kent Gustavsson, Charlie Dunbar Broad. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  12.  65
    Alexander Bird (2001). David Armstrong, Charlie Martin, and Ullin Place, Edited by Tim Crane Dispositions: A Debate; Stephen Mumford Dispositions. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 52 (1):137-149.
  13.  37
    Timothy Bays (2007). The Problem with Charlie: Some Remarks on Putnam, Lewis, and Williams. Philosophical Review 116 (3):401 - 425.
    In his new paper, “Eligibility and Inscrutability,” J. R. G. Williams presents a surprising new challenge to David Lewis’ theory of interpretation. Although Williams frames this challenge primarily as a response to Lewis’ criticisms of Putnam’s model-theoretic argument, the challenge itself goes to the heart of Lewis’ own account of interpretation. Further, and leaving Lewis’ project aside for a moment, Williams’ argument highlights some important—and some fairly general—points concerning the relationship between model theory and semantic determinacy.
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  14.  8
    Carrie Giunta, White Feather or Bowler Hat? Charlie Chaplin and the First World War. No Glory in War.
  15.  5
    Odile Cazenave (2014). LeMonologue de la muettede Khady Sylla et Charlie Van Damme. Diogène 245 (1):68.
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  16.  50
    Timothy Bays (2007). The Problem with Charlie: Some Remarks on Putnam, Lewis, and Williams. Philosophical Review 116 (3):401 - 425.
    In his new paper, “Eligibility and Inscrutability,” J. R. G. Williams presents a surprising new challenge to David Lewis’ theory of interpretation. Although Williams frames this challenge primarily as a response to Lewis’ criticisms of Putnam’s model-theoretic argument, the challenge itself goes to the heart of Lewis’ own account of interpretation. Further, and leaving Lewis’ project aside for a moment, Williams’ argument highlights some important—and some fairly general—points concerning the relationship between model theory and semantic determinacy.
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  17.  16
    Chris Dzialo (2009). Frustrated Time" Narration : The Screenplays of Charlie Kaufman. In Warren Buckland (ed.), Puzzle Films: Complex Storytelling in Contemporary Cinema. Wiley-Blackwell 107.
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  18.  27
    Michael Levine (1999). Rational Emotion, Emotional Holism, True Love, and Charlie Chaplin. Journal of Philosophical Research 24:487-504.
    This paper begins with an examination of Amelie Rorty’s claim that although “emotions cannot be rational in the narrow sense of being logically derived from accepted premises, they can be deemed rational . . . as ‘appropriately formed to serve our thriving.’” This is the background against which (i) I develop a notion of ‘emotional holism’ based on the aetiology of emotion in infantile phantasy; and (ii) introduce a dark corollary about the likelihood that our emotions do not, on the (...)
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  19.  23
    Steven Barbone (2008). Review of Charlie Huenemann (Ed.), Interpreting Spinoza: Critical Essays. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2008 (7).
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  20.  3
    Alissa MacMillan (2013). Spinoza’s Radical Theology: The Metaphysics of the Infinite, by Charlie Huenemann. International Journal of Philosophy and Theology 74 (5):467-468.
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  21.  6
    Joshua Landy (2011). Still Life in a Narrative Age: Charlie Kaufman's Adaptation. Critical Inquiry 37 (3):497-514.
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  22.  1
    Yuri Tsivian (2014). Charlie Chaplin and His Shadows: On Laws of Fortuity in Art. Critical Inquiry 40 (3):71-84.
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  23.  1
    Anna Bartlett (2011). In Which Charlie Makes a Wish. Agora 46 (3):26.
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  24.  2
    Diego Galeano (2013). Policías Que Mataron Policías: A Propósito de La Búsqueda. Una Entrevista Con Charlie Moore (Miguel Robles). Corpus.
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  25.  1
    Joshua Hall (2007). Charlie Karlssson, Per Flensburg, and Sven-Ake Hörte : Knowledge Spillovers and Knowledge Management. Knowledge, Technology and Policy 20 (3):201-202.
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  26.  1
    Konrad Gar-Yeu Ng (2002). Policing Cultural Traffic: Charlie Chan and Hawai'i Detective Fiction. Cultural Values 6 (3):309-316.
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  27. T. Bays (2007). The Problem with Charlie: Some Remarks on Putnam, Lewis, and Williams. Philosophical Review 116 (3):401-425.
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  28. Carrie Giunta (forthcoming). A Question of Listening: Nancean Resonance, Return and Relation in Charlie Chaplin. In Carrie Giunta & Adrienne Janus (eds.), Nancy and Visual Culture. Edinburgh University Press
  29. Tammy Nyden (2009). Charlie Huenemann, Ed., Interpreting Spinoza: Critical Essays. [REVIEW] Philosophy in Review 29 (1):35.
     
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  30. K. Richard Ridderinkhof, Nelleke C. van Wouwe, Guido P. H. Band, Scott A. Wylie, Stefan Van der Stigchel, Pieter van Hees, Jessika Buitenweg, Irene van de Vijver & Wery P. M. van den Wildenberg (2012). A Tribute to Charlie Chaplin: Induced Positive Affect Improves Reward-Based Decision-Learning in Parkinson’s Disease. Frontiers in Psychology 3.
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  31.  36
    William Day (2011). I Don't Know, Just Wait: Remembering Remarriage in Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind. In David LaRocca (ed.), The Philosophy of Charlie Kaufman. University Press of Kentucky
    "In 'I Don't Know, Just Wait: Remembering Remarriage in Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind', William Day shows how Kaufman's Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind should be considered part of the film genre known as remarriage comedy; but he also shows how Kaufman contributes something new to the genre. Day addresses, in particular, how the conversation that is the condition for reunion involves discovering 'what it means to have memories together as a way of learning how to be together'. (...)
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  32.  5
    Charlie Gere (2006). Art, Time, and Technology. Berg.
    This book explores how the practice of art, in particular of avant-garde art, keeps our relation to time, history and even our own humanity open. Examining key moments in the history of both technology and art from the beginnings of industrialisation to today, Charlie Gere explores both the making and purpose of art and how much further it can travel from the human body.
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  33. Charlie Kurth (2016). Anxiety, Normative Uncertainty, and Social Regulation. Biology and Philosophy 31 (1):1-21.
    Emotion plays an important role in securing social stability. But while emotions like fear, anger, and guilt have received much attention in this context, little work has been done to understand the role that anxiety plays. That’s unfortunate. I argue that a particular form of anxiety—what I call ‘practical anxiety’—plays an important, but as of yet unrecognized, role in norm-based social regulation. More specifically, it provides a valuable form of metacognition, one that contributes to social stability by helping individuals negotiate (...)
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  34. Charlie Kurth (2015). Moral Anxiety and Moral Agency. Oxford Studies in Normative Ethics 5:171-195.
    A familiar feature of moral life is the distinctive anxiety that we feel in the face of a moral dilemma or moral conflict. Situations like these require us to take stands on controversial issues. But because we are unsure that we will make the correct decision, anxiety ensues. Despite the pervasiveness of this phenomenon, surprisingly little work has been done either to characterize this “ moral anxiety” or to explain the role that it plays in our moral lives. This paper (...)
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  35.  88
    Jeremy I. M. Carpendale & Charlie Lewis (2004). Constructing an Understanding of Mind: The Development of Children's Social Understanding Within Social Interaction. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (1):79-96.
    Theories of children's developing understanding of mind tend to emphasize either individualistic processes of theory formation, maturation, or introspection, or the process of enculturation. However, such theories must be able to account for the accumulating evidence of the role of social interaction in the development of social understanding. We propose an alternative account, according to which the development of children's social understanding occurs within triadic interaction involving the child's experience of the world as well as communicative interaction with others about (...)
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  36.  14
    J. Lee, The Psychology of Screenwriting: Theory and Practice.
    The Psychology of Screenwriting is more than an interesting book on the theory and practice of screenwriting. It is also a philosophical analysis of predetermination and freewill in the context of writing and human life in our mediated world of technology. Drawing on humanism, existentialism, Buddhism, postmodernism and transhumanism, and diverse thinkers from Meister Eckhart to Friedrich Nietzsche, Theodor Adorno, Jacques Derrida, Jean Baudrillard and Gilles Deleuze, The Psychology of Screenwriting will be of use to screenwriters, film students, philosophers and (...)
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  37. Øystein Linnebo & David Nicolas (2008). Superplurals in English. Analysis 68 (299):186–197.
    where ‘aa’ is a plural term, and ‘F’ a plural predicate. Following George Boolos (1984) and others, many philosophers and logicians also think that plural expressions should be analysed as not introducing any new ontological commitments to some sort of ‘plural entities’, but rather as involving a new form of reference to objects to which we are already committed (for an overview and further details, see Linnebo 2004). For instance, the plural term ‘aa’ refers to Alice, Bob and Charlie (...)
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  38.  27
    Charlie Pelling (2013). Assertion and The Provision of Knowledge. Philosophical Quarterly 63 (251):293-312.
    Epistemic relationism in the theory of assertion is the view that an assertion's epistemic propriety depends purely on the relation between the asserter and the proposition asserted. Many accounts of assertion are relationist in this sense, including the familiar knowledge, belief, and justification accounts. A notable feature of such accounts is that they give no direct importance to the role of hearer: as far as such accounts are concerned, we need make no mention of hearers in characterising an assertion's propriety (...)
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  39. Charlie Kurth (2014). Expressivism and Innocent Mistakes. Ethics 124 (2):370-383.
    Allan Gibbard maintains that his plan-based expressivism allows for a particular type of innocent mistake: I can agree that your plan to X makes sense (say, because it was based on advice from someone you trust), while nonetheless insisting that it is incorrect (e.g., because you chose a bad advisor). However, Steve Daskal has recently argued that there are significant limitations in Gibbard’s account of how we can be mistaken about the normative judgments we make. This essay refines Gibbard’s account (...)
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  40.  91
    Charlie Pelling (2013). Testimony, Testimonial Belief, and Safety. Philosophical Studies 164 (1):205-217.
    Can one gain testimonial knowledge from unsafe testimony? It might seem not, on the grounds that if a piece of testimony is unsafe, then any belief based on it in such a way as to make the belief genuinely testimonial is bound itself to be unsafe: the lack of safety must transmit from the testimony to the testimonial belief. If in addition we accept that knowledge requires safety, the result seems to be that one cannot gain testimonial knowledge from unsafe (...)
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  41. Charlie Kurth (2013). What Do Our Critical Practices Say About the Nature of Morality? Philosophical Studies 166 (1):45-64.
    A prominent argument for moral realism notes that we are inclined to accept realism in science because scientific inquiry supports a robust set of critical practices—error, improvement, explanation, and the like. It then argues that because morality displays a comparable set of critical practices, a claim to moral realism is just as warranted as a claim to scientific realism. But the argument is only as strong as its central analogy—and here there is trouble. If the analogy between the critical practices (...)
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  42. Charlie Hailey (2010). Treillage'd Space. Environment, Space, Place 2 (2):79-119.
    Late in their architectural career, Alison and Peter Smithson designed an eighty-square-foot, indoor-outdoor space for a man and his cat. The Smithsons described this modest space in methodological and phenomenal terms, noting that the addition to Axel Bruchhäuser’s Hexenhaus could be read “as an exemplar of a method by which a small physical change—a layering-over of air adhered to an existing fabric—can bring about a delicate tuning of persons with place.” The Hexenhaus’ tuning elements—second skin, tree screen, and double-acting mesh—create (...)
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  43. Charlie Summers (forthcoming). Nehemiah 5:1–13. Interpretation 65 (2):184-185.
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  44.  31
    Charlie Pelling (2013). Assertion and Safety. Synthese 190 (17):3777-3796.
    Safety is a notion familiar to epistemologists principally because of the way in which it has been used in the attempt to cast light on the nature of knowledge. In particular, some have argued that an important constraint on knowledge is that one knows p only if one believes p safely. In this paper, I use safety for a different purpose: to cast light on the nature of assertion. I introduce what I call the safety account of assertion, according to (...)
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  45.  37
    Charlie Pelling (2013). Paradox and the Knowledge Account of Assertion. Erkenntnis 78 (5):977-978.
    In earlier work, I have argued that self-referential assertions of the form ‘this assertion is improper’ are paradoxical for the truth account of assertion. In this paper, I argue that such assertions are also paradoxical, though in a different way, for the knowledge account of assertion.
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  46.  88
    Charlie Summers (forthcoming). Book Review: Changing the Conversation: A Third Way for Congregations. [REVIEW] Interpretation 64 (2):219-220.
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  47. Charlie Kurth (2011). Logic for Morals, Morals From Logic. Philosophical Studies 155 (2):161-180.
    The need to distinguish between logical and extra-logical varieties of inference, entailment, validity, and consistency has played a prominent role in meta-ethical debates between expressivists and descriptivists. But, to date, the importance that matters of logical form play in these distinctions has been overlooked. That’s a mistake given the foundational place that logical form plays in our understanding of the difference between the logical and the extra-logical. This essay argues that descriptivists are better positioned than their expressivist rivals to provide (...)
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  48.  2
    Christine A. Henle, Charlie L. Reeve & Virginia E. Pitts (2010). Stealing Time at Work: Attitudes, Social Pressure, and Perceived Control as Predictors of Time Theft. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 94 (1):53 - 67.
    Organizations have long struggled to find ways to reduce the occurrence of unethical behaviors by employees. Unfortunately, time theft, a common and costly form of ethical misconduct at work, has been understudied by ethics researchers. In order to remedy this gap in the literature, we used the theory of planned behavior (TPB) to investigate the antecedents of time theft, which includes behaviors such as arriving later to or leaving earlier from work than scheduled, taking additional or longer breaks than is (...)
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  49. Liah Greenfeld (2005). When the Sky is the Limit: Busyness in Contemporary American Society. Social Research: An International Quarterly 72 (2):315-338.
    Gosh, we lead busy lives. Most of the people I know no longer have the time, even occasionally, to stop and think. And yet, this is not because we accomplish or do so much. In fact, in comparison with other historical and some contemporary societies, we do not. Think, for instance, about the masses of itinerant agricultural laborers who participated in the Gang System in early industrial England after 1834…. This form of labor organization was an answer to the demand (...)
     
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  50.  23
    Charlie Crerar (forthcoming). Taboo, Hermeneutical Injustice, and Expressively Free Environments. Episteme:1-13.
    In this paper I draw attention to a shortcoming in Miranda Fricker's 2007 account of hermeneutical injustice: that the only hermeneutical resource she acknowledges is a shared conceptual framework. Consequently, Fricker creates the impression that hermeneutical injustice manifests itself almost exclusively in the form of a conceptual lacuna. Considering the negative hermeneutical impact of certain societal taboos, however, suggests that there can be cases of hermeneutical injustice even when an agent's conceptual repertoire is perfectly adequate. I argue that this observation (...)
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