Search results for 'Charlie Tanksley' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Charlie Tanksley (2010). The Mereological Constancy of Masses. Philosophical Quarterly 60 (239):343-354.score: 120.0
    It is controversial whether masses (what mass nouns refer to) exist. But on the assumption that they do, here are two uncontroversial facts about them: first, they satisfy a fusion principle which takes any set of masses of kind K and yields a mass fusion of kind K; secondly, a mass must have all and only the same parts at every time at which it exists. These two theses are usually built into the concept 'mass'. I argue that the latter (...)
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  2. A. Henle Christine, L. Reeve Charlie & E. Pitts Virginia (2010). Stealing Time at Work: Attitudes, Social Pressure, and Perceived Control as Predictors of Time Theft. Journal of Business Ethics 94 (1).score: 30.0
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  3. Steven Barbone (2008). Review of Charlie Huenemann (Ed.), Interpreting Spinoza: Critical Essays. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2008 (7).score: 9.0
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  4. David L. Smith (2006). The Implicit Soul of Charlie Kaufman's Adaptation. Philosophy and Literature 30 (2):424-435.score: 9.0
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  5. Kent Gustavsson, Charlie Dunbar Broad. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 9.0
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  6. Alexander Bird (2001). David Armstrong, Charlie Martin, and Ullin Place, Edited by Tim Crane Dispositions: A Debate; Stephen Mumford Dispositions. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 52 (1):137-149.score: 9.0
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  7. Timothy Bays (2007). The Problem with Charlie: Some Remarks on Putnam, Lewis, and Williams. Philosophical Review 116 (3):401 - 425.score: 9.0
    In his new paper, “Eligibility and Inscrutability,” J. R. G. Williams presents a surprising new challenge to David Lewis’ theory of interpretation. Although Williams frames this challenge primarily as a response to Lewis’ criticisms of Putnam’s model-theoretic argument, the challenge itself goes to the heart of Lewis’ own account of interpretation. Further, and leaving Lewis’ project aside for a moment, Williams’ argument highlights some important—and some fairly general—points concerning the relationship between model theory and semantic determinacy.
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  8. Harry A. Grace (1952). Charlie Chaplin's Films and American Culture Patterns. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 10 (4):353-363.score: 9.0
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  9. Michael Levine (1999). Rational Emotion, Emotional Holism, True Love, and Charlie Chaplin. Journal of Philosophical Research 24:487-504.score: 9.0
    This paper begins with an examination of Amelie Rorty’s claim that although “emotions cannot be rational in the narrow sense of being logically derived from accepted premises, they can be deemed rational . . . as ‘appropriately formed to serve our thriving.’” This is the background against which (i) I develop a notion of ‘emotional holism’ based on the aetiology of emotion in infantile phantasy; and (ii) introduce a dark corollary about the likelihood that our emotions do not, on the (...)
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  10. C. Levi-Strauss (1954). Reviews : The Art of Deciphering Symbols (in Four Lessons, to Be Followed or Not to Be Followed): Soogwilis, a Collection of Kwakiutl Indian Designs and Legends by R. Geddes/ Large Toronto: The Ryerson Press, I95i. Pp. 87 and 33 Coloured Plates by Charlie George. /The Lost Language of Symbolism by Harold Bayley N.E., London: William and Norgate, I952. 2 Vols. Pp. IX-375 and Pp. VIII-3,888, I,4i8 Illustrations. / The Cinderella Cycle by Anna Birgitta Rooth Lund: C. W. K. Gleerup, I95i. Pp. 269 and XVI Inserted Recapitulated Pictures. The Life-Giving Myth by A. M. Hocart Edited, with Introduction by Lord Raglan. London: Methuen and Co., I952. Pp. 252. [REVIEW] Diogenes 2 (5):101-108.score: 9.0
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  11. Wery P. M. Van den Wildenberg K. Richard Ridderinkhof, Nelleke C. Van Wouwe, Guido P. H. Band, Scott A. Wylie, Stefan Van der Stigchel, Pieter van Hees, Jessika Buitenweg, Irene van de Vijver (2012). A Tribute to Charlie Chaplin: Induced Positive Affect Improves Reward-Based Decision-Learning in Parkinson's Disease. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 9.0
    Reward-based decision-learning refers to the process of learning to select those actions that lead to rewards while avoiding actions that lead to punishments. This process, known to rely on dopaminergic activity in striatal brain regions, is compromised in Parkinson’s disease (PD). We hypothesized that such decision-learning deficits are alleviated by induced positive affect, which is thought to incur transient boosts in midbrain and striatal dopaminergic activity. Computational measures of probabilistic reward-based decision-learning were determined for 51 patients diagnosed with PD. Previous (...)
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  12. Neil Cohn (2014). You're a Good Structure, Charlie Brown: The Distribution of Narrative Categories in Comic Strips. Cognitive Science 38 (2).score: 9.0
    Cohn's (2013) theory of “Visual Narrative Grammar” argues that sequential images take on categorical roles in a narrative structure, which organizes them into hierarchic constituents analogous to the organization of syntactic categories in sentences. This theory proposes that narrative categories, like syntactic categories, can be identified through diagnostic tests that reveal tendencies for their distribution throughout a sequence. This paper describes four experiments testing these diagnostics to provide support for the validity of these narrative categories. In Experiment 1, participants reconstructed (...)
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  13. Chris Dzialo (2009). Frustrated Time" Narration : The Screenplays of Charlie Kaufman. In Warren Buckland (ed.), Puzzle Films: Complex Storytelling in Contemporary Cinema. Wiley-Blackwell. 107.score: 9.0
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  14. Diego Galeano (2013). Policías Que Mataron Policías: A Propósito de La Búsqueda. Una Entrevista Con Charlie Moore (Miguel Robles. Corpus.score: 9.0
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  15. Joshua Landy (2011). Still Life in a Narrative Age: Charlie Kaufman's Adaptation. Critical Inquiry 37 (3):497-514.score: 9.0
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  16. Konrad Gar-Yeu Ng (2002). Policing Cultural Traffic: Charlie Chan and Hawai'i Detective Fiction. Cultural Values 6 (3):309-316.score: 9.0
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  17. Anna Bartlett (2011). In Which Charlie Makes a Wish. Agora 46 (3):26.score: 9.0
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  18. Joshua Hall (2007). Charlie Karlssson, Per Flensburg, and Sven-Ake Hörte (Eds): Knowledge Spillovers and Knowledge Management. Knowledge, Technology and Policy 20 (3):201-202.score: 9.0
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  19. Tammy Nyden (2009). Charlie Huenemann, Ed., Interpreting Spinoza: Critical Essays. Philosophy in Review 29 (1):35.score: 9.0
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  20. William Day (2011). I Don't Know, Just Wait: Remembering Remarriage in Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind. In David LaRocca (ed.), The Philosophy of Charlie Kaufman. University Press of Kentucky.score: 6.0
    "In 'I Don't Know, Just Wait: Remembering Remarriage in Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind', William Day shows how Kaufman's Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind should be considered part of the film genre known as remarriage comedy; but he also shows how Kaufman contributes something new to the genre. Day addresses, in particular, how the conversation that is the condition for reunion involves discovering 'what it means to have memories together as a way of learning how to be together'. (...)
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  21. Charlie Gere (2006). Art, Time, and Technology. Berg.score: 6.0
    This book explores how the practice of art, in particular of avant-garde art, keeps our relation to time, history and even our own humanity open. Examining key moments in the history of both technology and art from the beginnings of industrialisation to today, Charlie Gere explores both the making and purpose of art and how much further it can travel from the human body.
     
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  22. Charlie Pelling (2011). Characterizing Hallucination Epistemically. Synthese 178 (3):437 - 459.score: 3.0
    According to the epistemic theory of hallucination, the fundamental psychological nature of a hallucinatory experience is constituted by its being 'introspectively indiscriminable', in some sense, from a veridical experience of a corresponding type. How is the notion of introspective indiscriminability to which the epistemic theory appeals best construed? Following M. G. F. Martin, the standard assumption is that the notion should be construed in terms of negative epistemics: in particular, it is assumed that the notion should be explained in terms (...)
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  23. Brian Weatherson (2013). The Role of Naturalness in Lewis's Theory of Meaning. Journal for the History of Analytical Philosophy 1 (10).score: 3.0
    Many writers have held that in his later work, David Lewis adopted a theory of predicate meaning such that the meaning of a predicate is the most natural property that is (mostly) consistent with the way the predicate is used. That orthodox interpretation is shared by both supporters and critics of Lewis's theory of meaning, but it has recently been strongly criticised by Wolfgang Schwarz. In this paper, I accept many of Schwarze's criticisms of the orthodox interpretation, and add some (...)
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  24. Charlie Kurth (2011). Logic for Morals, Morals From Logic. Philosophical Studies 155 (2):161-180.score: 3.0
    The need to distinguish between logical and extra-logical varieties of inference, entailment, validity, and consistency has played a prominent role in meta-ethical debates between expressivists and descriptivists. But, to date, the importance that matters of logical form play in these distinctions has been overlooked. That’s a mistake given the foundational place that logical form plays in our understanding of the difference between the logical and the extra-logical. This essay argues that descriptivists are better positioned than their expressivist rivals to provide (...)
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  25. Jeremy I. M. Carpendale & Charlie Lewis (2004). Constructing an Understanding of Mind: The Development of Children's Social Understanding Within Social Interaction. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (1):79-96.score: 3.0
    Theories of children's developing understanding of mind tend to emphasize either individualistic processes of theory formation, maturation, or introspection, or the process of enculturation. However, such theories must be able to account for the accumulating evidence of the role of social interaction in the development of social understanding. We propose an alternative account, according to which the development of children's social understanding occurs within triadic interaction involving the child's experience of the world as well as communicative interaction with others about (...)
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  26. Charlie Kurth (2014). Expressivism and Innocent Mistakes. Ethics 124 (2):370-383.score: 3.0
    Allan Gibbard maintains that his plan-based expressivism allows for a particular type of innocent mistake: I can agree that your plan to X makes sense (say, because it was based on advice from someone you trust), while nonetheless insisting that it is incorrect (e.g., because you chose a bad advisor). However, Steve Daskal has recently argued that there are significant limitations in Gibbard’s account of how we can be mistaken about the normative judgments we make. This essay refines Gibbard’s account (...)
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  27. Charlie Kurth (2013). What Do Our Critical Practices Say About the Nature of Morality? Philosophical Studies 166 (1):45-64.score: 3.0
    A prominent argument for moral realism notes that we are inclined to accept realism in science because scientific inquiry supports a robust set of critical practices—error, improvement, explanation, and the like. It then argues that because morality displays a comparable set of critical practices, a claim to moral realism is just as warranted as a claim to scientific realism. But the argument is only as strong as its central analogy—and here there is trouble. If the analogy between the critical practices (...)
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  28. Charlie Pelling (2013). Testimony, Testimonial Belief, and Safety. Philosophical Studies 164 (1):205-217.score: 3.0
    Can one gain testimonial knowledge from unsafe testimony? It might seem not, on the grounds that if a piece of testimony is unsafe, then any belief based on it in such a way as to make the belief genuinely testimonial is bound itself to be unsafe: the lack of safety must transmit from the testimony to the testimonial belief. If in addition we accept that knowledge requires safety, the result seems to be that one cannot gain testimonial knowledge from unsafe (...)
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  29. Øystein Linnebo & David Nicolas (2008). Superplurals in English. Analysis 68 (299):186–197.score: 3.0
    where ‘aa’ is a plural term, and ‘F’ a plural predicate. Following George Boolos (1984) and others, many philosophers and logicians also think that plural expressions should be analysed as not introducing any new ontological commitments to some sort of ‘plural entities’, but rather as involving a new form of reference to objects to which we are already committed (for an overview and further details, see Linnebo 2004). For instance, the plural term ‘aa’ refers to Alice, Bob and Charlie (...)
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  30. Andrea Borghini, Dispositions and Their Intentions.score: 3.0
    – Dispositional Realism is the view according to which some denizens of reality – i.e., dispositions – are properties, that may exist in the natural world and have an irreducible modal character. Among Dispositional Realists, Charlie Martin, Ullin Place and George Molnar most notably argued that the modal character of dispositions should be understood in terms of their intentionality. Other Dispositional Realists, most notably Stephen <span class='Hi'>Mumford</span>, challenged this understanding of the modal character of dispositions. In this paper, I (...)
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  31. Charlie Pelling (2007). Conceptualism and the (Supposed) Non-Transitivity of Colour Indiscriminability. Philosophical Studies 134 (2):211 - 234.score: 3.0
    In this paper, I argue that those who accept the conceptualist view in the philosophy of perception should reject the traditional view that colour indiscriminability is non-transitive. I start by outlining the general strategy that conceptualists have adopted in response to the familiar ‘fineness of grain’ objection, and I show why a commitment to what I call the indiscriminability claim seems to form a natural part of this strategy. I then show how together, the indiscriminability claim and the non-transitivity claim (...)
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  32. Charlie Pelling (2007). Conceptualism and the Problem of Illusory Experience. Acta Analytica 22 (3):169-182.score: 3.0
    According to the conceptualist view in the philosophy of perception, we possess concepts for all the objects, properties, and relations which feature in our experiences. Richard Heck has recently argued that the phenomenon of illusory experience provides us with conclusive reasons to reject this view. In this paper, I examine Heck’s argument, I explain why I think that Bill Brewer’s conceptualist response to it is ineffective, and I then outline an alternative conceptualist response which I myself endorse. My argument turns (...)
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  33. Charlie Pelling (2013). Paradox and the Knowledge Account of Assertion. Erkenntnis 78 (5):977-978.score: 3.0
    In earlier work, I have argued that self-referential assertions of the form ‘this assertion is improper’ are paradoxical for the truth account of assertion. In this paper, I argue that such assertions are also paradoxical, though in a different way, for the knowledge account of assertion.
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  34. Charlie Huenemann, Nietzsche and the Perspective of Life.score: 3.0
    This paper is an extended version of "Valuing from life's perspective." In this paper, with the aim of explaining Nietzsche's view, I illustrate one way of making sense of a theoretical entity (called "Life"), which has values and a perspective. Then I turn to Nietzsche's perspectivism, with the hope of explaining why Life's perspective should be in any way privileged. Finally, I explain how trying to live from Life's perspective would force us to change our values - and, in particular, (...)
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  35. Pete Mandik (2012). Mental Colors, Conceptual Overlap, and Discriminating Knowledge of Particulars. Consciousness and Cognition 21 (2):641-643.score: 3.0
    I respond to the separate commentaries by Jacob Berger, Charlie Pelling, and David Pereplyotchik on my paper, “Color-Consciousness Conceptualism.” I resist Berger’s suggestion that mental colors ever enter consciousness without accompaniment by deployments of concepts of their extra-mental counterparts. I express concerns about Pelling’s proposal that a more uniform conceptualist treatment of phenomenal sorites can be gained by a simple appeal to the partial overlap of the extensions of some concepts. I question the relevance to perceptual consciousness of the (...)
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  36. Charlie Huenemann (2010). Nietzschean Health and the Inherent Pathology of Christianity. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 18 (1):73-89.score: 3.0
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  37. Crispin Sartwell (2010). Political Aesthetics. Cornell University Press.score: 3.0
    Leni Riefenstahl meets Charlie Chaplin : aesthetics of the Third Reich -- Artphilosophical themes -- Dead Kennedys and Black Flags : artpolitics of punk -- Prehistory of political aesthetics -- Red, gold, black, and green : black nationalist aesthetics -- Arthistorical themes -- Political power and transcendental geometry : Republican classicism in early America.
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  38. Gregory Bergman (2011). I Watch, Therefore I Am: From Socrates to Sartre, the Great Mysteries of Life as Explained Through Howdy Doody, Marcia Brady, Homer Simpson, Don Draper, and Other Tv Icons. Adams Media.score: 3.0
    What's the world made of? Donuts! and Beer! -- Protagoras, Gorgias, Captain Kirk, and Denny Crane -- Socrates : The Sergeant Schultz of Ancient Greece -- Plato is the new American Idol -- Aristotle loves Lucy -- Charlie Harper's Non-Epicurean lifestyle -- St. Augustine's Highway to Heaven -- Scully shaves Mulder with Ockham's Razor -- Larry Hagman dreams of Descartes -- Locke versus Hobbes, or The Brady Bunch takes on Survivor -- Can or can't Kant like vampires? -- Reading (...)
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  39. Charlie Huenemann, Valuing From Life's Perspective.score: 3.0
    Nietzsche launches powerful critiques of traditional moral values on the basis of “life's perspectives and objectives.” But what does this mean? Several recent commentators have tried to provide an explanation by ascribing to Nietzsche a will-to-power metaphysic, but there are solid reasons for thinking that Nietzsche did not intend to provide any comprehensive metaphysical system. This paper explains “life's perspectives” by showing how to construct a theoretical entity (“Life”) that has a perspective and can do the philosophical work Nietzsche requires. (...)
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  40. Charlie Pelling (2013). Assertion and Safety. Synthese 190 (17):3777-3796.score: 3.0
    Safety is a notion familiar to epistemologists principally because of the way in which it has been used in the attempt to cast light on the nature of knowledge. In particular, some have argued that an important constraint on knowledge is that one knows p only if one believes p safely. In this paper, I use safety for a different purpose: to cast light on the nature of assertion. I introduce what I call the safety account of assertion, according to (...)
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  41. Frida Beckman & Charlie Blake (2011). Visions of Cruelty. Angelaki 15 (1):149-167.score: 3.0
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  42. Charlie Huenemann, Nietzsche's Illness.score: 3.0
    This essay recounts recent psychiatric literature about the probable causes of Nietzsche's collapse, endorsing the conclusion that it was not syphilis. The essay then explores the role of madness in Nietzsche's philosophy, and also explores to what extent some sort of madness - whether psychological or philosophical - influenced his later philosophy.
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  43. Charlie Huenemann (2008). The Good Life in the Scientific Revolution: Descartes, Pascal, and the Cultivation of Virtue. Journal of the History of Philosophy 46 (2):pp. 321-322.score: 3.0
  44. Andrew Chrucky, C. D. Broad: The Default Philosopher of the Century.score: 3.0
    Charlie Dunbar Broad is one of the most important philosophers of this century. I know that this may sound like a very irresponsible -- even whimsical -- thing to say; so I better make a strong case for this assertion. Right away, philosophers who share other sympathies may start listing more famous philosophers as prima facie evidence against my apparently rash opinion.
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  45. Charlie Pelling (2013). Assertion and The Provision of Knowledge. Philosophical Quarterly 63 (251):293-312.score: 3.0
    Epistemic relationism in the theory of assertion is the view that an assertion's epistemic propriety depends purely on the relation between the asserter and the proposition asserted. Many accounts of assertion are relationist in this sense, including the familiar knowledge, belief, and justification accounts. A notable feature of such accounts is that they give no direct importance to the role of hearer: as far as such accounts are concerned, we need make no mention of hearers in characterising an assertion's propriety (...)
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  46. Russ Castronovo (2007). Beautiful Democracy: Aesthetics and Anarchy in a Global Era. University of Chicago Press.score: 3.0
    The photographer and reformer Jacob Riis once wrote, “I have seen an armful of daisies keep the peace of a block better than a policeman and his club.” Riis was not alone in his belief that beauty could tame urban chaos, but are aesthetic experiences always a social good? Could aesthetics also inspire violent crime, working-class unrest, and racial murder? To answer these questions, Russ Castronovo turns to those who debated claims that art could democratize culture—civic reformers, anarchists, novelists, civil (...)
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  47. Charlie Huenemann (2008). The Good Life in the Scientific Revolution: Descartes, Pascal, and The. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Philosophy 46 (2):321-322.score: 3.0
  48. Charlie Lewis & Jeremy I. M. Carpendale (2009). Carruthers' Marvelous Magical Mindreading Machine. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 32 (2):152-152.score: 3.0
    Carruthers presents an interesting analysis of confabulation and a clear attack on introspection. Yet his theory-based alternative is a mechanistic view of which neglects the fact that social understanding occurs within a network of social relationships. In particular, the role of language in his model is too simple.
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  49. Jeremy I. M. Carpendale & Charlie Lewis (2004). Constructing Understanding, with Feeling. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (1):130-141.score: 3.0
    We explore three types of criticisms of our theory on the development of children's social understanding. We reject suggestions that we offer nothing new to traditional theories of development or recent “social” accounts of “theory of mind.” Second, we take the point that there are grounds for improving our account of dyadic interaction in infancy but reject claims that we have not sufficiently accounted for how we incorporate the notions of criteria and structure into the theory. Third, we accept that (...)
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