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  1. Charlotte Katzoff (2008). Jacob and Isaac: A Tale of Deception and Self-Deception. In Charles Harry Manekin & Robert Eisen (eds.), Philosophers and the Jewish Bible. University Press of Maryland.
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  2. Charlotte Katzoff (2004). Religious Luck and Religious Virtue. Religious Studies 40 (1):97-111.
    Following Linda Zagzebski's discussion of the paradoxical implications of moral luck for Christian morality, I explore the role of religious luck in two accounts of divine election – that of Paul the Apostle and that of the sixteenth-century Jewish thinker, Rabbi Judah Loeb of Prague. On both accounts, special religious status is conferred unrelated to the deserts of the beneficiary. What sense does it make to ascribe religious worth to someone if it simply came his way? Both accounts appeal to (...)
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  3. Charlotte Katzoff (2003). The Selling of Joseph-A Frankfurtian Interpretation. In David Widerker & Michael McKenna (eds.), Moral Responsibility and Alternative Possibilities: Essays on the Importance of Alternative Possibilities. Ashgate. 327.
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  4. Charlotte Katzoff (2001). Epistemic Virtue and Epistemic Responsibility. Dialectica 55 (2):105–118.
    In this paper, I propose a principle of doxastic rationality based on Bernard Williams's argument against doxastic voluntarism. This principle, I go on to show, undermines a number of notions of epistemic duty which have been put forth within the framework of virtue theory. I then suggest an alternative formulation which remains within the bounds of rationality allowed for by my principle. In the end, I suggest that the failure of the earlier formulations and the adoption of the latter tend (...)
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  5. Charlotte Katzoff (2000). Counter-Evidence and the Duty to Critically Reflect. Analysis 60 (1):89–96.
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  6. Charlotte Katzoff (1996). Avoidability and Libertarianism. Faith and Philosophy 13 (3):415-421.
    Recently, Widerker has attacked Fischer’s contention that one could use Frankfurt-type counterexamples to the principle of alternative possibilities to show that even from a libertarian viewpoint an agent might be morally responsible for a decision that he could not have avoided. Fischer has responded by: (a) arguing that Widerker’s criticism presupposes the falsity of Molinism and (b) presenting a version of libertarianism which avoids Widerker’s criticism. Here we argue that: (i) Fischer’s first response is unconvincing and undermines Molinism itself; (ii) (...)
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  7. Charlotte Katzoff (1996). Epistemic Obligation and Rationality Constraints. Southern Journal of Philosophy 34 (4):455-470.
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  8. Charlotte Katzoff (1996). When Is Knowledge a Matter of Luck? Grazer Philosophische Studien 51:105-120.
    It is quite common that a claim to knowledge is dismissed as a matter of luck. It is demonstrated that when one cites as the reason for rejecting a true belief that it is merely lucky, this is typically because the belief has not satisfied the requirements of one's theory. So disputes on luck in fact turn out to be disputes on deep epistemological issues. Criterea for epistemological luck suggested by Thomas Nagel, Nicolas Rescher, Alvin Goldman, Mylan Engel and Richard (...)
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  9. David Widerker & Charlotte Katzoff (1994). Zimmerman on Moral Responsibility, Obligation and Alternate Possibilities. Analysis 54 (4):285 - 287.
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  10. Charlotte Katzoff (1992). Justification Without Good Reasons. Philosophical Papers 21 (2):121-131.
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  11. Charlotte Katzoff (1992). Oakeshott and the Practice of Politics. Journal of Philosophical Research 17:265-277.
    Oakeshott’s thesis is that political knowledge is essentially praetical: it is not given to propositional formulation and cannot be deliberately exercised, but rather is expressed in conduct and transmitted by example and practice. I argue that this is true primarily of physical skills which depend upon unconscious, automatic physiological processes. Political practice, by contrast, is largely a matter of rule-governed activity. It is an empirical fact that we do have introspcetive access to many of the rules whieh govern our political (...)
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  12. Charlotte Katzoff (1989). Intentional Action—Sometimes a Matter of Luck. Philosophical Investigations 12 (3):234-242.
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  13. Charlotte Katzoff (1984). Knowing How. Southern Journal of Philosophy 22 (1):61-69.
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  14. Charlotte Katzoff (1981). Salomon Maimon's Critique of Kant's Theory of Consciousness. Zeitschrift für Philosophische Forschung 35 (2):185 - 195.
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  15. Charlotte Katzoff (1976). Book Reviews. [REVIEW] Philosophia 6 (2):379-386.
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