Search results for 'Charmaine Royal' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  13
    Britt M. Rusert & Charmaine D. M. Royal (2011). Grassroots Marketing in a Global Era: More Lessons From BiDil. Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 39 (1):79-90.
    BiDil, a heart failure drug for African Americans, emerged five years ago as the first FDA approved drug targeted at a specific racial group. While critical scholarship and the popular media have meticulously detailed the history of BiDil from its inauspicious beginnings as a generic combination drug for the general population to its dramatic resuscitation as a racial medicine, the enthusiastic support shown by some African American interest groups has been too little understood, as has their argument that BiDil was (...)
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  2.  3
    Annette Dula, Charmaine Royal, Marian Gray Secundy & Steven Miles (2003). The Ethical and Social Implications of Exploring African American Genealogies. Developing World Bioethics 3 (2):133-141.
    In June 2002, the University of Minnesota hosted a conference to explore the implications of using genetic technologies and genealog.
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  3.  1
    Ambroise Wonkam, Jantina de Vries, Charmaine Royal, Raj Ramesar & I. I. I. Fru Angwafo (2014). Would You Terminate a Pregnancy Affected by Sickle Cell Disease?: Analysis of Views of Patients in Cameroon. Journal of Medical Ethics 40 (9):615-620.
    Sickle cell disease is a debilitating illness that affects quality of life and life expectancy for patients. In Cameroon, it is now possible to opt for termination of an affected pregnancy where the fetus is found to be affected by SCD. Our earlier studies found that, contrary to the views of Cameroonian physicians, a majority of parents with their children suffering from SCD would choose to abort if the fetuses were found to be affected. What have not yet been investigated (...)
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  4. Britt M. Rusert & Charmaine D. M. Royal (2011). Grassroots Marketing in a Global Era: More Lessons From BiDil. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 39 (1):79-90.
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  5. Antoine Arnauld, Thomas Spencer Baynes & Port Royal (1851). The Port Royal Logic [by A. Arnauld and P. Nicole] Tr. With Intr., Notes and Appendix by T.S. Baynes.
  6.  2
    Charmaine Royal Annette Dula & Abridged By Steven Miles Marian Gray Secundy (2003). The Ethical and Social Implications of Exploring African American Genealogies. Developing World Bioethics 3 (2):133–141.
    ABSTRACTIn June 2002, the University of Minnesota hosted a conference to explore the implications of using genetic technologies and genealogical methods to reconstruct African identity. This paper includes transcribed remarks from that conference by Annette Dula, Marian Gray Secundy and Charmaine Royal.
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  7.  10
    Franz Huber (forthcoming). Why Follow the Royal Rule? Synthese:1-26.
    This note is a sequel to Huber. It is shown that obeying a normative principle relating counterfactual conditionals and conditional beliefs, viz. the royal rule, is a necessary and sufficient means to attaining a cognitive end that relates true beliefs in purely factual, non-modal propositions and true beliefs in purely modal propositions. Along the way I will sketch my idealism about alethic or metaphysical modality.
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  8.  3
    Teresa Álvarez Mateos (2015). La relación entre gramática y pensamiento en la Gramática de Port Royal: un contraste con la Minerva de Francisco Sánchez. Ingenium. Revista Electrónica de Pensamiento Moderno y Metodología En Historia de la Ideas 9:3-22.
    En relación polémica con la señalada continuidad entre la Gramática de Port-Royal y la Minerva de Francisco Sánchez, y de ambas respecto de los desarrollos recientes de la Lingüística, este ensayo pretende profundizar en las diferencias entre estos enfoques, atendiendo en especial al particular modo de entender las relaciones entre gramática y pensamiento en las obras de Francisco Sánchez y Port-Royal.
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  9.  39
    Maurice A. Finocchiaro (1997). The Port-Royal Logic's Theory of Argument. Argumentation 11 (4):393-410.
    This is a critical examination of Antoine Arnauld's Logic or the Art of Thinking (1662), commonly known as the Port-Royal Logic. Rather than reading this work from the viewpoint of post-Fregean formal logic or the viewpoint of seventeenth-century intellectual history, I approach it with the aim of exploring its relationship to that contemporary field which may be labeled informal logic and/or argumentation theory. It turns out that the Port-Royal Logic is a precursor of this current field, or conversely, (...)
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  10.  4
    Bernard Joly (2012). Etienne-François Geoffroy, entre la Royal Society et l'Académie royale des sciences : ni Newton, ni Descartes. Methodos 12.
    Etienne-François Geoffroy, l’un des chimistes français les plus importants du début du XVIIIe siècle, entretenait des relations régulières avec l’Angleterre. Il était chargé de développer les échanges entre l’Académie royale des sciences et la Royal Society de Londres. Quand il publia sa « Table des rapports entre les substances chimiques » en 1718, Fontenelle et quelques autres lui reprochèrent d’avoir introduit en chimie le système des attractions newtoniennes. Mais en fait, Geoffroy s’est toujours tenu à l’écart aussi bien du (...)
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  11.  1
    Núria Pérez-Pérez (2010). Medicine and Science in a New Medical-Surgical Context: The Royal College of Surgery of Barcelona (1760–1843). [REVIEW] Medicine Studies 2 (1):37-48.
    Taking the Royal College of Barcelona (1760–1843) as a case study, this paper shows the development of modern surgery in Spain initiated by the Bourbon Monarchy when they founded new kinds of institutions as academic activities to spread scientific knowledge. Antoni Gimbernat was the most famous internationally recognised Spanish surgeon. He was trained as a surgeon at the Royal College of Surgery in Cadiz and was later appointed Professor of Anatomy at the College of Barcelona. He then became (...)
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  12.  1
    Alessandro Giuliani (1991). Les “Règles de la Discussion Légitime” Dans la Logique de Port-Royal. Argumentation 5 (3):263-273.
    In the XVIIth century the conflict which opposed the jansenists to the jesuits involved the problem of the due process in theological matter. The jesuits heralded the thesis that the infallibility of the Church has to be extended from dogmatics (‘quaestio iuris’) to the historical facts (‘quaestio facti’). On the opposite side Arnauld maintained that such an opinion was ‘monstruous’: also in religious matters the ‘fact’ has to be proved according to the principles of a due process, and not by (...)
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  13.  22
    Udo Schüklenk, Johannes J. M. van Delden, Jocelyn Downie, Sheila A. M. Mclean, Ross Upshur & Daniel Weinstock (2011). End-of-Life Decision-Making in Canada: The Report by the Royal Society of Canada Expert Panel on End-of-Life Decision-Making. Bioethics 25 (s1):1-73.
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  14.  6
    Rahul Singh, Robert Chauhan & Suhail Anwar (2012). Improving the Quality of General Surgical Operation Notes in Accordance with the Royal College of Surgeons Guidelines: A Prospective Completed Audit Loop Study. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 18 (3):578-580.
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  15. D. J. Bryden & D. L. Simms (1993). Spectacles Improved to Perfection and Approved of by the Royal Society. Annals of Science 50 (1):1-32.
    The letter sent by the Royal Society to the London optician, John Marshall, in 1694, commending his new method of grinding, has been reprinted, and referred to, in recent years. However, there has been no comprehensive analysis of the method itself, the letter and the circumstances in which it was written, nor the consequences for trade practices. The significance of the approval by the Royal Society of this innovation and the use of that approbation by John Marshall and (...)
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  16.  13
    R. Janssens, J. J. M. van Delden & G. A. M. Widdershoven (2012). Palliative Sedation: Not Just Normal Medical Practice. Ethical Reflections on the Royal Dutch Medical Association's Guideline on Palliative Sedation. Journal of Medical Ethics 38 (11):664-668.
    The main premise of the Royal Dutch Medical Association's (RDMA) guideline on palliative sedation is that palliative sedation, contrary to euthanasia, is normal medical practice. Although we do not deny the ethical distinctions between euthanasia and palliative sedation, we will critically analyse the guideline's argumentation strategy with which euthanasia is demarcated from palliative sedation. First, we will analyse the guideline's main premise, which entails that palliative sedation is normal medical treatment. After this, we will critically discuss three crucial propositions (...)
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  17.  88
    John Saunders (2008). Institutional Ethics Committees: Lessons From the Royal College of Physicians? Clinical Ethics 3 (1):46-49.
    Some health-care institutions have ethics committees. The experience of the Ethical Issues Committee at the Royal College of Physicians is described. Ethics committees in institutions may be reactive or creative, must determine an agenda and must deal with dissent.
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  18.  7
    Daniel Carey (1997). Compiling Nature's History: Travellers and Travel Narratives in the Early Royal Society. Annals of Science 54 (3):269-292.
    The relationship between travel, travel narrative, and the enterprise of natural history is explored, focusing on activities associated with the early Royal Society. In an era of expanding travel, for colonial, diplomatic, trade, and missionary purposes, reports of nature's effects proliferated, both in oral and written forms. Naturalists intent on compiling a comprehensive history of such phenomena, and making them useful in the process, readily incorporated these reports into their work. They went further by trying to direct the course (...)
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  19.  14
    Stephen M. Gardiner (2011). Some Early Ethics of Geoengineering the Climate: A Commentary on the Values of the Royal Society Report. Environmental Values 20 (2):163 - 188.
    The Royal Society's landmark report on geoengineering is predicated on a particular account of the context and rationale for intentional manipulation of the climate system, and this ethical framework probably explains many of the Society's conclusions. Critical reflection on the report's values is useful for understanding disagreements within and about geoengineering policy, and also for identifying questions for early ethical analysis. Topics discussed include the moral hazard argument, governance, the ethical status of geoengineering under different rationales, the implications of (...)
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  20.  41
    Jill Vance Buroker (1993). The Port-Royal Semantics of Terms. Synthese 96 (3):455 - 475.
    L'A. étudie la théorie classique du jugement telle qu'elle apparait dans «La logique» de A. Arnauld et P. Nicole et oppose la sémantique des termes généraux de Port-Royal à celles de Kant et Frege.
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  21.  2
    John Neil Martin (forthcoming). A Note on ‘Distributive Terms, Truth, and The Port Royal Logic’. History and Philosophy of Logic:1-2.
    A note correcting some technical terminology from linguistics found in ‘Distributive Terms, Truth, and The Port Royal Logic’, this journal, Jan. 17, 2013, 133–54.
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  22.  15
    Yann Allard-Tremblay (2013). Proceduralism, Judicial Review and the Refusal of Royal Assent. Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 33 (2):379-400.
    This article provides an exploration of the relationships between a procedural account of epistemic democracy, illegitimate laws and judicial review. I first explain how there can be illegitimate laws within a procedural account of democracy. I argue that even if democratic legitimacy is conceived procedurally, it does not imply that democracy could legitimately undermine itself or adopt grossly unjust laws. I then turn to the legitimacy of judicial review with regard to these illegitimate laws. I maintain that courts do not (...)
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  23.  1
    Michael Hunter (2007). Robert Boyle and the Early Royal Society: A Reciprocal Exchange in the Making of Baconian Science. British Journal for the History of Science 40 (1):1-23.
    This paper documents an important development in Robert Boyle's natural-philosophical method – his use from the 1660s onwards of ‘heads’ and ‘inquiries’ as a means of organizing his data, setting himself an agenda when studying a subject and soliciting information from others. Boyle acknowledged that he derived this approach from Francis Bacon, but he had not previously used it in his work, and the reason why it came to the fore when it did is not apparent from his printed and (...)
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  24.  17
    Andrew W. Collins (2012). The Royal Costume and Insignia of Alexander the Great. American Journal of Philology 133 (3):371-402.
    Alexander’s proclamation as King of Asia was not a claim to be the new king of Persia or the new Great King. Alexander’s empire was one above and beyond the local kingship of Persia, and this “revisionist” interpretation of Alexander’s kingship requires a new assessment of Alexander’s reconfigured royal costume. Alexander rejected the upright tiara and the “Median” dress, such as the kandys and anaxyrides. In adopting a new and impressive royal costume, Alexander expressed the exalted nature of (...)
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  25.  7
    Tee Rogers-Hayden & John R. Campbell (2003). Re-Negotiating Science in Environmentalists' Submissions to New Zealand's Royal Commission on Genetic Modification. Environmental Values 12 (4):515 - 534.
    The debate about genetic modification (GM) can be seen as characteristic of our time. Environmental groups, in challenging GM, are also challenging modernist faith in progress, and science and technology. In this paper we use the case of New Zealand's Royal Commission on Genetic Modification to explore the application of science discourses as used by environmental groups. We do this by situating the debate in the framework of modernity, discussing the use of science by environmental groups, and deconstructing the (...)
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  26.  10
    Palmira Fontes da Costa (2002). The Making of Extraordinary Facts: Authentication of Singularities of Nature at the Royal Society of London in the First Half of the Eighteenth Century. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 33 (2):265-288.
    This paper is concerned with the particular problems raised by observations of phenomena outside the common course of nature for their validation as knowledge. It examines to what extent the content of the reports and, in particular, their lack of intrinsic plausibility affected the methods used in their authentication and the assessment of testimony at the Royal Society in the first half of the eighteenth century. I show that literary strategies were usually necessary but not sufficient for the validation (...)
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  27.  6
    Roger L. Emerson (1988). Sir Robert Sibbald, Kt, The Royal Society of Scotland and the Origins of the Scottish Enlightenment. Annals of Science 45 (1):41-72.
    This paper shows that in late seventeenth-century Scotland there existed a sizeable virtuoso community whose leaders were abreast of European developments in philosophy, history and science. Moreover, by c. 1700, Sir Robert Sibbald was attempting to organize a learned society modelled upon those he knew in Europe and upon London's Royal Society. The interests of the virtuosi and their attempts to institutionalize their pursuits laid much of the ground work for the Scottish Enlightenment. The Royal Society of Scotland (...)
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  28.  12
    Constance B. Hieatt & Robin F. Jones (1986). Two Anglo-Norman Culinary Collections Edited From British Library Manuscripts Additional 32085 and Royal 12.C.Xii. Speculum 61 (4):859-882.
    The earliest English culinary recipes occur in two Anglo-Norman manuscripts, both in the British Library: Additional 32085 and Royal 12.C.xii. A transcription of the latter, with a few footnotes citing recipes in the former, was published by Paul Meyer in 1893 . Meyer proposed to publish a full version of the earlier manuscript at a later date, but he never did. No new Anglo-Norman collections have turned up since that time, although we have searched in a great number of (...)
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  29.  2
    David Miller (1983). Between Hostile Camps: Sir Humphry Davy's Presidency of The Royal Society of London, 1820–1827. British Journal for the History of Science 16 (1):1-47.
    The career of Humphry Davy is one of the fairy tales of early nineteenth-century British science. His rise from obscure Cornish origins to world-wide eminence as a chemical discoverer, to popular celebrity amongst London's scientific audiences, to a knighthood from the Prince Regent, and finally to the Presidency of the Royal Society, provide apposite material for Smilesian accounts of British society as open to talents. But the use of Davy's career to illustrate the thesis that ‘genius will out’ is (...)
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  30.  1
    P. B. Wood (1980). Methodology and Apologetics: Thomas Sprat's History of the Royal Society. British Journal for the History of Science 13 (1):1-26.
    Central to Thomas Sprat's History of the Royal Society was the description and justification of the method adopted and advocated by the Fellows of the Society, for it was thought that it was their method which distinguished them from ancients, dogmatists, sceptics, and contemporary natural philosophers such as Descartes. The Fellows saw themselves as furthering primarily a novel method, rather than a system, of philosophy, and the History gave expression to this corporate self-perception. However, the History's description of their (...)
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  31.  21
    Jean Sorabella (2007). A Satyr for Midas: The Barberini Faun and Hellenistic Royal Patronage. Classical Antiquity 26 (2):219-248.
    The canonical statue known as the Barberini Faun is roundly viewed as a mysterious anomaly. The challenge to interpret it is intensified not only by uncertainties about its date and origin but also by the persistent idea that it represents a generic satyr. This paper tackles this assumption and identifies the statue with the satyr that King Midas captured in the well-known myth. Iconographic analysis of the statue's pose supports this view. In particular, the arm bent above the head, the (...)
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  32.  6
    M. Henig, Royal Coin Cabinet The Hague & M. Maaskant-Kleibrink (1980). Catalogue of the Engraved Gems in the Royal Coin Cabinet, the Hague: The Greek, Etruscan and Roman Collections. Journal of Hellenic Studies 100:287.
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  33.  15
    Steven Nadler (1988). Cartesianism and Port-Royal. The Monist 71 (4):573-584.
    Contrary to what appears to be popular belief, Port-Royal was not a bastion of cartesianism. In fact, Of all the port-Royalists of the seventeenth century, Only arnauld can be considered a cartesian in any interesting sense. Most of the others associated with the order were hostile to the new philosophy and actively campaigned against it, Believing it to pose a threat to piety and "true" religion. This can be seen by examining the writings of de sacy, Du vaucel, And (...)
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  34.  5
    W. D. Hackmann (1979). Underwater Acoustics and the Royal Navy, 1893–1930. Annals of Science 36 (3):255-278.
    The real impetus for the research in underwater acoustics was the German U-boat menace of World War I. Traditional naval methods were of little use against the submarine, and thus British scientists concentrated on underwater detection. This led to the development of the hydrophone , which was extensively used during the war. As this instrument had many drawbacks, a small British team started to investigate an ‘active’ detection device in 1917. This was instigated by the work of the French physicist (...)
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  35.  1
    Steven Shapin (1974). Property, Patronage, and the Politics of Science: The Founding of the Royal Society of Edinburgh. British Journal for the History of Science 7 (1):1-41.
    The institutionalization of natural knowledge in the form of a scientific society may be interpreted in several ways. If we wish to view science as something apart, unchanging in its intellectual nature, we may regard the scientific enterprise as presenting to the sustaining social system a number of absolute and necessary organizational demands: for example, scientific activity requires acceptance as an important social activity valued for its own sake, that is, it requires autonomy; it is separate from other forms of (...)
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  36. Jane Carruthers (2008). Scientists in Society: The Royal Society of South Africa. Transactions of the Royal Society of South Africa 63 (1):1-30.
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  37.  6
    Eric L. Santner (2010). The Royal Remains: Carl Schmitt's Hamlet or Hecuba. Telos: Critical Theory of the Contemporary 2010 (153):30-50.
    ExcerptI.In her study of the role of theater and popular entertainments in the dissemination of the doctrine of the “king's two bodies” in the second half of the sixteenth century, Marie Axton emphasizes that this period was one of high anxiety with respect not only to the problem of royal succession but more generally to “the very principles by which government and authority are perpetuated.”1 The legal and political problem of succession was, of course, especially acute because of Elizabeth's (...)
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  38.  9
    Margalit Finkelberg (1991). Royal Succession in Heroic Greece. Classical Quarterly 41 (02):303-.
    This article is about the rules of succession in Bronze Age Greece as reflected in Greek tradition. The question as to whether or not the figures dealt with by this tradition are historical is of little relevance to the present discussion: what I seek to recover is not the history of one royal house or another but rather the recurring patterns according to which the members of these houses – no matter whether real or fictitious – were expected to (...)
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  39.  13
    Michael W. Small (1995). Business Ethics and Commercial Morality: Report of the Royal Commission Into Commercial Activities. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 14 (8):613 - 628.
    This section is focused on some areas of concern which were identified in The Report of the Royal Commission into Commercial Activities of Government and Other Matters (1990–1992). In the Report a number of situations were examined in which some individuals acted without recourse to any ethical guidelines. Most of the people mentioned in the Report held responsible positions in either Government or the private sector, and all were very well known in the community. The Report of the (...) Commission made a number of findings of serious impropriety on the part of several individuals, although there was comparatively little evidence of illegal or corrupt conduct. This section shows what happened to a governmental system in an Australian state when a number of Ministers and their advisors placed their personal or party advantage over their constitutional obligation to act in the community''s interests.Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it. (shrink)
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  40.  5
    W. R. de Jong (1993). De taalfilosofie Van port-Royal en het ontologisch vierkant : Over substantieven en adjectieven. Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 55 (2):241-264.
    According to the grammar of Port-Royal it is possible to convert the noun ‘homme’ into the adjective 'humain' by adding a confused signification or connotation. Strangely enough it is stipulated that by the reversal of this process the adjective 'human' is converted into the substantive ‘humanité’ rather than the original noun ‘homme’. In this article I argue that the treatment of adjectives and substantives in the Port-Royal grammar depends strongly on the traditional Aristotelian ontology as summarized in the (...)
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  41.  4
    Steven Nadler (1988). Cartesianism and Port-Royal in Descartes and His Contemporaries. The Monist 71 (4):573-584.
    CONTRARY TO WHAT APPEARS TO BE POPULAR BELIEF, PORT-ROYAL WAS NOT A BASTION OF CARTESIANISM. IN FACT, OF ALL THE PORT-ROYALISTS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY, ONLY ARNAULD CAN BE CONSIDERED A CARTESIAN IN ANY INTERESTING SENSE. MOST OF THE OTHERS ASSOCIATED WITH THE ORDER WERE HOSTILE TO THE NEW PHILOSOPHY AND ACTIVELY CAMPAIGNED AGAINST IT, BELIEVING IT TO POSE A THREAT TO PIETY AND "TRUE" RELIGION. THIS CAN BE SEEN BY EXAMINING THE WRITINGS OF DE SACY, DU VAUCEL, AND (...)
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  42.  2
    J. D. Dawson, A. T. Altschul, C. Sampson & A. M. Smith (1977). Royal College of Nursing (Rcn) Code of Professional Conduct: A Discussion Document. Journal of Medical Ethics 3 (3):115-123.
    We are printing in its entirety the discussion document which sets out a code of professional conduct for nurses published by the Royal College of Nursing in November 1976 together with commentaries by the Assistant Secretary of the British Medical Association, a professor of nursing studies, student nurses and a lawyer. The image of the nurse is still that of one of Florence Nightingale's young ladies or of a member of a religious order who is wholly dedicated to caring (...)
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  43. David Miller (1999). The Usefulness of Natural Philosophy: The Royal Society and the Culture of Practical Utility in the Later Eighteenth Century. British Journal for the History of Science 32 (2):185-201.
    From its very beginning the Royal Society was regarded by many, if not most, of its founders as centrally concerned with practical improvement. How could it be otherwise? The study of nature was not only a pious act in and of itself – a reading of the book of nature – but it was also the way in which God's Providence would provide discoveries for the relief of man's estate. The early ideologues of the Society, such as Robert Boyle (...)
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  44.  3
    A. A. Mills & M. L. Jones (1989). Three Lenses by Constantine Huygens in the Possession of the Royal Society of London. Annals of Science 46 (2):173-182.
    The Royal Society possesses three long-focus simple lenses of diameters 195, 210 and 230 mm, all inscribed with the signature ‘C. Huygens’ and various dates in the year 1686. These prove to have been made by Constantine Huygens, the elder brother of the famous Christiaan Huygens. All three lenses have been examined by a variety of physical and chemical methods, both to define their optical characteristics and to establish the composition of dated samples of late-seventeenth-century Continental glass. The focal (...)
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  45.  8
    Jessica Ratcliff (2011). Virtuosity and the Early Royal Society of London. Metascience 20 (3):569-571.
    Virtuosity and the early Royal Society of London Content Type Journal Article Pages 1-3 DOI 10.1007/s11016-010-9506-0 Authors Jessica Ratcliff, Graduate School of Library and Information Science, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 501 E. Daniel St, Champaign, II 61820, USA Journal Metascience Online ISSN 1467-9981 Print ISSN 0815-0796.
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  46.  7
    Seiko Kitajima (1999). Sponsorship, Academic Independence and Critical Engagement: A Forum on Shell, the Ogoni Dispute and the Royal Geographical Society (with the Institute of British Geographers). Philosophy and Geography 2 (2):254 – 256.
    (1999). Sponsorship, academic independence and critical engagement: A forum on shell, the Ogoni dispute and the royal geographical society (with the institute of British geographers) Philosophy & Geography: Vol. 2, No. 2, pp. 254-256.
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  47.  1
    Elizabeth Brown (1980). The Ceremonial of Royal Succession in Capetian France: The Funeral of Philip VArticle Author Querybrown Ear [Google Scholar]. Speculum 55 (2):266-293.
    Few accounts of funeral ceremonies performed for the rulers of France before the early fifteenth century are now extant. The rare eyewitness reports of such rites are generally terse and abbreviated, and there survive only fragments of the fiscal accounts listing expenses for the services, which inevitably provide a wealth of detail overlooked or ignored by observers. The want of information cannot be attributed solely to the disappearance of once abundant documentary remains, for even in the early fifteenth century such (...)
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  48.  2
    Ian Maxey (1999). Sponsorship, Academic Independence and Critical Engagement: A Forum on Shell, the Ogoni Dispute and the Royal Geographical Society (with the Institute of British Geographers). Philosophy and Geography 2 (2):242 – 246.
    (1999). Sponsorship, academic independence and critical engagement: A forum on shell, the Ogoni dispute and the royal geographical society (with the institute of British geographers) Philosophy & Geography: Vol. 2, No. 2, pp. 242-246.
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    Debra Morris (2003). Surety Wives in the House of Lords: Time forSolicitors to `Get Real'?Royal Bank of Scotland Plc V. Etridge (No. 2) [2001] 4 All E.R. 449. [REVIEW] Feminist Legal Studies 11 (1):57-69.
    This note considers the recent House of Lordsdecision in Royal Bank of Scotland plc. v.Etridge (No. 2). It concerns the familiarscenario of a wife jointly mortgaging (orproviding a guarantee for a mortgage of) thefamily home in order to secure financialsupport for a business run by her husband. Ina landmark judgement, Lord Nicholls set out newand specific procedures to be followed bylenders and solicitors who are providingindependent advice, in order to counter anyargument by the wife that the charge should beset (...)
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  50. W. P. U. Jackson (1990). The Royal Society of South Africa. Transactions of the Royal Society of South Africa 47 (3):363-363.
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