Search results for 'Cheating' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  14
    Jingqiu Chen, Thomas Li-Ping Tang & Ningyu Tang (2013). Temptation, Monetary Intelligence (Love of Money), and Environmental Context on Unethical Intentions and Cheating. Journal of Business Ethics 123 (2):1-23.
    In Study 1, we test a theoretical model involving temptation, monetary intelligence (MI), a mediator, and unethical intentions and investigate the direct and indirect paths simultaneously based on multiple-wave panel data collected in open classrooms from 492 American and 256 Chinese students. For the whole sample, temptation is related to low unethical intentions indirectly. Multi-group analyses reveal that temptation predicts unethical intentions both indirectly and directly for male American students only; but not for female American students. For Chinese students, both (...)
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  2.  31
    Helen A. Klein, Nancy M. Levenburg, Marie McKendall & William Mothersell (2007). Cheating During the College Years: How Do Business School Students Compare? [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 72 (2):197 - 206.
    When it comes to cheating in higher education, business school students have often been accused of being the worst offenders; if true, this may be a contributing factor in the kinds of fraud that have plagued the business community in recent years. We examined the issue of cheating in the business school by surveying 268 students in business and other professional schools on their attitudes about, and experiences with, cheating. We found that while business school students actually (...)
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  3.  40
    Tim West, Sue Ravenscroft & Charles Shrader (2004). Cheating and Moral Judgment in the College Classroom: A Natural Experiment. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 54 (2):173 - 183.
    The purpose of this paper is to present the results of a natural experiment involving academic cheating by university students. We explore the relationship of moral judgment to actual behavior, as well as the relationship between the honesty of students self-reports and the extent of cheating. We were able to determine the extent to which students actually cheated on the take-home portion of an accounting exam. The take-home problem was not assigned with the intent of inducing cheating (...)
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  4.  31
    James M. Bloodgood, William H. Turnley & Peter Mudrack (2008). The Influence of Ethics Instruction, Religiosity, and Intelligence on Cheating Behavior. Journal of Business Ethics 82 (3):557 - 571.
    This study examines the influence of ethics instruction, religiosity, and intelligence on cheating behavior. A sample of 230 upper level, undergraduate business students had the opportunity to increase their chances of winning money in an experimental situation by falsely reporting their task performance. In general, the results indicate that students who attended worship services more frequently were less likely to cheat than those who attended worship services less frequently, but that students who had taken a course in business ethics (...)
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  5.  20
    Richard A. Bernardi, Rene L. Metzger, Ryann G. Scofield Bruno, Marisa A. Wade Hoogkamp, Lillian E. Reyes & Gary H. Barnaby (2004). Examining the Decision Process of Students' Cheating Behavior: An Empirical Study. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 50 (4):397-414.
    This research examines the association between attitudes on cheating and cognitive moral development. In this research, we use Rest's (1979a) Defining Issues Test, the Attitudes on Honesty Scale (Authors) and Academic Integrity Index (Authors); the last two are adaptations of the DIT. A total of 220 students from three universities participated in the study (66 psychology majors and 154 business majors). The data indicate that 66.4 percent of the students reported that they cheated in high school, college, or both (...)
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  6.  21
    S. R. Premeaux (2005). Undergraduate Student Perceptions Regarding Cheating: Tier 1 Versus Tier 2 AACSB Accredited Business Schools. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 62 (4):407 - 418.
    Cheating is fairly commonplace at both Tiers 1 and 2 AACSB accredited business schools. Distinct differences exist between Tiers 1 and 2 students with regard to cheating. Tier 1 students are more likely to cheat on written assignments, they believe sanctions impact cheating, and that a stigma is attached to cheating. Tier 2 students are more likely to cheat on exams, and nearly as likely to cheat on written assignments. Tier 2 students accept the notion that (...)
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  7.  9
    James M. Bloodgood, William H. Turnley & Peter E. Mudrack (2010). Ethics Instruction and the Perceived Acceptability of Cheating. Journal of Business Ethics 95 (1):23 - 37.
    This study examined whether undergraduate students' perceptions regarding the acceptability of cheating were influenced by the amount of ethics instruction the students had received and/or by their personality. The results, from a sample of 230 upper-level undergraduate students, indicated that simply taking a business ethics course did not have a significant influence on students' views regarding cheating. On the other hand, Machiavellianism was positively related to perceiving that two forms of cheating were acceptable. Moreover, in testing for (...)
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  8.  24
    Donald L. McCabe (1997). Classroom Cheating Among Natural Science and Engineering Majors. Science and Engineering Ethics 3 (4):433-445.
    The topic of cheating among college students has received considerable attention in the education and psychology literatures. But most of this research has been conducted with relatively small samples and individual projects have generally focused on students from a single campus. These studies have improved our understanding of cheating in college, but it is difficult to generalize their findings and it is also difficult to develop a good understanding of the differences that exist among different academic majors. Understanding (...)
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  9.  23
    Arthur Coren (2011). Turning a Blind Eye: Faculty Who Ignore Student Cheating. [REVIEW] Journal of Academic Ethics 9 (4):291-305.
    In this study, 40.3% of faculty members admitted to ignoring student cheating on one or more occasions. The quality of past experience in dealing with academic integrity violations was examined. Faculty members with previous bad experiences were more likely to prefer dealing with cheating by ignoring it. The data were further analysed to determine beliefs and attitudes that distinguish between faculty who have never ignored an instance of cheating and those who indicated that they have ignored one (...)
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  10.  5
    Richard J. Fendler & Jonathan M. Godbey (2016). Cheaters Should Never Win: Eliminating the Benefits of Cheating. Journal of Academic Ethics 14 (1):71-85.
    Numerous academic studies and reports indicate that as many as half of all students cheat on exams. Cheating on exams undermines the central purpose of a university, corrupts the meaning of grades as a measure of subject matter mastery, and significantly harms honest students. Although instructors are aware that many students cheat and they clearly oppose the behavior, they do little to punish cheaters. Accusing, prosecuting and convicting cheaters are time intensive, stressful and potentially costly activities for which faculty (...)
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  11.  18
    Yuchao Ma, Donald L. McCabe & Ruizhi Liu (2013). Students' Academic Cheating in Chinese Universities: Prevalence, Influencing Factors, and Proposed Action. [REVIEW] Journal of Academic Ethics 11 (3):169-184.
    Quantitative research about academic cheating among Chinese college students is minimal. This paper discusses a large survey conducted in Chinese colleges and universities which examined the prevalence of different kinds of student cheating and explored factors that influence cheating behavior. A structural equation model was used to analyze the data. Results indicate that organizational deterrence and individual performance have a negative impact on cheating while individual perceived pressure, peers’ cheating, and extracurricular activities have a positive (...)
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  12.  54
    Rafik Z. Elias (2009). The Impact of Anti-Intellectualism Attitudes and Academic Self-Efficacy on Business Students' Perceptions of Cheating. Journal of Business Ethics 86 (2):199 - 209.
    College cheating represents a major ethical problem facing students and educators, especially in colleges of business. The current study surveys 666 business students in three universities to examine potential determinants of cheating perceptions. Anti-intellectualism refers to a student’s negative view of the value and importance of intellectual pursuits and critical thinking. Academic self-efficacy refers to a student’s belief in one’s ability to accomplish an academic task. As hypothesized, students high in anti-intellectualism attitudes and those with low academic self-efficacy (...)
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  13.  21
    Kenneth J. Smith, Jeanette A. Davy & Debbie Easterling (2004). An Examination of Cheating and its Antecedents Among Marketing and Management Majors. Journal of Business Ethics 50 (1):63-80.
    This study examines cheating behaviors among 742 marketing and management majors at three public AACSB-accredited business schools. Specifically, we studied the simultaneous influence of demographic and attitudinal characteristics on: (1) reported prior cheating behavior; (2) the tendency to neutralize cheating behaviors; and, (3) likelihood of future cheating. We additionally examined the impact of in-class deterrents on neutralization of cheating behaviors and the likelihood of future cheating. We also directly tested potential mediating effects of neutralization (...)
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  14.  4
    Tianlan Wei, Steven R. Chesnut, Lucy Barnard-Brak & Marcelo Schmidt (2014). University Students’ Perceptions of Academic Cheating: Triangulating Quantitative and Qualitative Findings. Journal of Academic Ethics 12 (4):287-298.
    Using a parallel mixed-methods design, the current study examined university students’ perceptions of academic cheating through collecting and analyzing both the quantitative and qualitative data. Our quantitative findings corroborate previous research that male students have engaged more in academic cheating than females based on students’ self-reports, and that undergraduate students are less willing to discuss issues on academic cheating as compared with their graduate counterparts. Five themes emerged from the thematic analysis of the qualitative data: flexible definitions (...)
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  15.  11
    Kathleen K. Molnar & Marilyn G. Kletke (2012). Does the Type of Cheating Influence Undergraduate Students' Perceptions of Cheating? Journal of Academic Ethics 10 (3):201-212.
    There has been a plethora of studies outlying the various factors which may affect undergraduate student cheating, generally focusing on individual, situational and deterrent factors. But beyond these factors, does the type of cheating affect students’ perceptions of cheating? We found that there were differences in regards to gradable cheating such as cheating on homework, tests and papers versus non-gradable cheating such as illegally downloading software/music from the Internet or photocopying materials which violate the (...)
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  16.  5
    Alan Fask, Fred Englander & Zhaobo Wang (2014). Do Online Exams Facilitate Cheating? An Experiment Designed to Separate Possible Cheating From the Effect of the Online Test Taking Environment. Journal of Academic Ethics 12 (2):101-112.
    Despite recent growth in distance education, there has been relatively little research on whether online examinations facilitate student cheating. The present paper utilizes an experimental design to assess the difference in student performance between students taking a traditional, proctored exam and those taking an online, unproctored exam. This difference in performance is examined in a manner which considers both the effect of the different physical test environments and the possible effect of a difference in the opportunity for students to (...)
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  17.  27
    Mary Walker & Cynthia Townley (2012). Contract Cheating: A New Challenge for Academic Honesty? [REVIEW] Journal of Academic Ethics 10 (1):27-44.
    ‘Contract cheating’ has recently emerged as a form of academic dishonesty. It involves students contracting out their coursework to writers in order to submit the purchased assignments as their own work, usually via the internet. This form of cheating involves epistemic and ethical problems that are continuous with older forms of cheating, but which it also casts in a new form. It is a concern to educators because it is very difficult to detect, because it is arguably (...)
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  18.  26
    Alireza Ahmadi (2012). Cheating on Exams in the Iranian EFL Context. Journal of Academic Ethics 10 (2):151-170.
    The present study aimed at investigating the status of cheating on exams in the Iranian EFL context. One hundred thirty two university students were surveyed to this end. They were selected through convenient sampling. The results indicated that cheating is quite common among the Iranian language students. The most important reasons for this behavior were found to be “not being ready for the exam”, “difficulty of the exam”, “lack of time to study” and “careless and lenient instructors”. The (...)
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  19.  8
    Tricia Bertram Gallant, Lelli Van Den Einde, Scott Ouellette & Sam Lee (2014). A Systemic Analysis of Cheating in an Undergraduate Engineering Mechanics Course. Science and Engineering Ethics 20 (1):277-298.
    Cheating in the undergraduate classroom is not a new problem, and it is recognized as one that is endemic to the education system. This paper examines the highly normative behavior of using unauthorized assistance (e.g., a solutions manual or a friend) on an individual assignment within the context of an upper division undergraduate course in engineering mechanics. The findings indicate that there are varying levels of accepting responsibility among the students (from denial to tempered to full) and that acceptance (...)
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  20.  16
    Jeremy J. Sierra & Michael R. Hyman (2008). Ethical Antecedents of Cheating Intentions: Evidence of Mediation. [REVIEW] Journal of Academic Ethics 6 (1):51--66.
    Although the pedagogy literature indicates significant relationships between cheating intentions and both personal and situational factors, no published research has examined the joint effect of personal moral philosophy and perceived moral intensity components on students’ cheating intentions. Hence, a structural equation model that relates magnitude of consequences, relativism, and idealism to willingness to cheat, is developed and tested. Using data from undergraduate business students, the empirical results provide insight into these relationships and evidence of mediation for magnitude of (...)
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  21.  4
    Audrey J. Burnett, Theresa M. Enyeart Smith & Maria T. Wessel (2016). Use of the Social Cognitive Theory to Frame University Students’ Perceptions of Cheating. Journal of Academic Ethics 14 (1):49-69.
    The purpose of this qualitative study was to examine the perceptions related to ethics and cheating among a representative sample of primarily female undergraduate students, compared to trends reported in the literature. Focus groups were organized to discuss nine scripted questions. Transcripts and audiotapes were analyzed and four main themes emerged: demographics of those who cheat, students’ perceptions of cheating, the role of technology in cheating, and consequences of cheating, including students’ attitudes and behaviors related to (...)
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  22.  43
    Joel Marks (2003). Cheating 101: Ethics as a Lab Course. Teaching Philosophy 26 (2):131-145.
    What is the point of teaching about abortion, euthanasia, and capital punishment, if the students are cheating in the course? As much as eighty per cent of our students cheat. Cheating is the norm. Furthermore, ethics courses are not immune. I decided, therefore, to seize the bull by the horns and challenge my ethics students not to cheat. I employed a form of so-called contract grading, which placed the burden of honesty on the students instead of the usual (...)
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  23.  10
    Christian Miller (2013). Honesty, Cheating, and Character in College. Journal of College and Character:213-222.
    Colleges and universities need to first develop an empirically informed understanding of their students when it comes to their honesty and cheating, so as to be in a better position to develop policies which can try to help them not become more disposed to cheat during their college years. In section one of this paper, I review some of the leading research on cheating behavior, and in section two I do the same for cheating motivation. Section three (...)
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  24.  13
    Marek Preiss, Helen A. Klein, Nancy M. Levenburg & Alena Nohavova (2013). A Cross-Country Evaluation of Cheating in Academia—A Comparison of Data From the US and the Czech Republic. Journal of Academic Ethics 11 (2):157-167.
    In this study, we examine differences in cheating behaviors in higher education between two countries, namely the United States and the Czech Republic, which differ in many social, cultural and political aspects. We compare a recent (2011) Czech Republic survey of 291 students to that of 268 students in the US (Klein et al., 2007). For all items surveyed, CR students showed a higher propensity to engage in cheating. Additionally, we found more forms of serious cheating present (...)
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  25.  3
    Tricia Bertram Gallant, Nancy Binkin & Michael Donohue (2015). Students at Risk for Being Reported for Cheating. Journal of Academic Ethics 13 (3):217-228.
    Student cheating has always been a problem in higher education, but detection of cheating has become easier with technology. As a result, more students are being caught and reported for cheating. While reporting cheating is not a negative, the rippling effects of reported cheating may be felt by some populations more than others. Thus, preventing cheating would be a preferable option for all involved.Identifying those at risk for being reported for cheating is a (...)
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  26.  9
    Aurora A. C. Teixeira (2013). Sanding the Wheels of Growth: Cheating by Economics and Business Students and 'Real World' Corruption. [REVIEW] Journal of Academic Ethics 11 (4):269-274.
    The relation between academic integrity and real world corruption is more often presumed than proven. Based on a sample of 7,602 students from 21 countries, it was found that academic cheating in the past is a predictor of the countries’ current level of corruption. This reproducibility and persistence over time of dishonest behaviors highlights the danger of disregarding students cheating at university.
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  27.  5
    Chihaya Kusayanagi (2013). Constructing and Understanding an Incident as a Social Problem: A Case Study of University Entrance Exam Cheating in Japan. [REVIEW] Human Studies 36 (1):133-148.
    The recent work of Frances Chaput Waksler—The New Orleans Sniper: A Phenomenological Case Study of Constituting the Other—demonstrates, by close examination of the case of the New Orleans Sniper of 1973, how people constitute and unconstitute an “Other” in certain situations. This paper explores the process by which people constituted the Other in Japan in February of 2011 through the course of an incident that surprised Japanese people: university entrance exam cheating by use of the Internet question-and-answer bulletin board. (...)
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  28.  8
    Robert Liebler (2012). Student Perceptions of Faculty Use of Cheating Deterrents. Journal of Academic Ethics 10 (4):327-333.
    Evidence is provided on faculty use of cheating deterrents for in-class exams. The evidence comes from a survey of students who report on their most recent in-class exam in a randomly selected course that they are taking. Three types of cheating are considered: (i) advance knowledge of exam questions; (ii) copying; and (iii) other improper student actions during the exam. The deterrents examined consist of the following: (i) a rate of repeating questions; (ii) multiple versions of the exam (...)
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  29.  7
    Aditya Simha, Josh Armstrong & Joseph Albert (2011). Volunteers Versus Non-Volunteers—Which Group Cheats More, and Holds More Lax Attitudes About Cheating? Journal of Academic Ethics 9 (3):205-215.
    Academic dishonesty has been a frequent topic of research and discussion. In this article, we examine the differences between student volunteers and student non-volunteers in terms of their attitudes towards academic dishonesty as well as their cheating behaviors. We found that student volunteers held more serious attitudes towards cheating and academic dishonesty than did student non-volunteers; however there were not many significant differences between student volunteers and student non-volunteers when it came to cheating behaviors. We finally provide (...)
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  30. Rebecca Roache (2008). Enhancement and Cheating. Expositions 2 (2):153-156.
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  31.  15
    Iris Jenkel & Jason J. Haen (2012). Influences on Students' Decisions to Report Cheating: A Laboratory Experiment. [REVIEW] Journal of Academic Ethics 10 (2):123-136.
    Abstract We use a controlled laboratory experiment design to test rational choice theory on student whistleblowing. We examine reporting costs by comparing actual reporting behavior under anonymous and non-anonymous reporting channels. Reporting benefits are explored by considering the influence on reporting of group versus individual reward systems. We find that the type of reporting channel does not significantly influence student reporting behavior. Rewarding students based on group test scores results in significantly higher reporting rates compared to a system rewarding students (...)
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  32.  12
    Gerd Gigerenzer & Klaus Hug (1992). Domain-Specific Reasoning: Social Contracts, Cheating, and Perspective Change. Cognition 43 (2):127-171.
    What counts as human rationality: reasoning processes that embody content-independent formal theories, such as propositional logic, or reasoning processes that are well designed for solving important adaptive problems? Most theories of human reasoning have been based on content-independent formal rationality, whereas adaptive reasoning, ecological or evolutionary, has been little explored. We elaborate and test an evolutionary approach, Cosmides' social contract theory, using the Wason selection task. In the first part, we disentangle the theoretical concept of a “social contract” from that (...)
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  33.  90
    Donald L. McCabe, Linda Klebe Trevino & Kenneth D. Butterfield (2001). Cheating in Academic Institutions: A Decade of Research. Ethics and Behavior 11 (3):219 – 232.
    This article reviews 1 decade of research on cheating in academic institutions. This research demonstrates that cheating is prevalent and that some forms of cheating have increased dramatically in the last 30 years. This research also suggests that although both individual and contextual factors influence cheating, contextual factors, such as students' perceptions of peers' behavior, are the most powerful influence. In addition, an institution's academic integrity programs and policies, such as honor codes, can have a significant (...)
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  34.  29
    Raef A. Lawson (2004). Is Classroom Cheating Related to Business Students' Propensity to Cheat in the "Real World"? Journal of Business Ethics 49 (2):189-199.
    Previous studies have reportedstudents' widely held belief that they are moreethical than businessmen. On the other hand,widespread cheating among college students hasbeen reported. This paper examines thisinconsistency between the beliefs of collegestudent regarding the need for ethical behaviorin a business setting and their actions in anacademic setting.The results of this study indicate that whilestudents are generally upset with cheating intheir class, a large proportion of themnonetheless engage in such behavior. It wasfurther found that students have a goodunderstanding of (...)
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  35. Rob Goodman (2010). Cognitive Enhancement, Cheating, and Accomplishment. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 20 (2):pp. 145-160.
    In an essay on performance-enhancing drugs, author Chuck Klosterman (2007) argues that the category of enhancers extends from hallucinogens used to inspire music to steroids used to strengthen athletes—and he criticizes those who would excuse one means of enhancement while railing against the other as a form of cheating: After the summer of 1964, the Beatles started taking serious drugs, and those drugs altered their musical performance. Though it may not have been their overt intent, the Beatles took performance-enhancing (...)
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  36.  38
    Deborah F. Crown & M. Shane Spiller (1998). Learning From the Literature on Collegiate Cheating: A Review of Empirical Research. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 17 (6):229-246.
    The role demographic, personality, and situational factors play in the ethical decision making process has received a significant amount of attention (Ford and Richardson, 1994). However, the empirical research on students' decisions to engage in collegiate cheating has not been included in this literature. This paper reviews the last 25 years of empirical research on collegiate cheating. The individual/situational factor typology from Ford and Richardson's review (1994) is used to compare the two literatures. In addition, issues pertaining to (...)
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  37.  25
    M. Schermer (2008). On the Argument That Enhancement is "Cheating". Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (2):85-88.
    One frequently used argument in the discussion on human enhancement is that enhancement is a form of cheating. This argument is well-known in relation to doping in sports, but recently it has also been used with regard to cognitive enhancement in the context of education and exams. This paper analyses the enhancement-is-cheating argument by comparing sports and education, and by evaluating how the argument can be interpreted in both contexts. If cheating is understood as breaking the rules (...)
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  38.  28
    Augustus E. Jordan (2001). College Student Cheating: The Role of Motivation, Perceived Norms, Attitudes, and Knowledge of Institutional Policy. Ethics and Behavior 11 (3):233 – 247.
    Cheaters and noncheaters were assessed on 2 types of motivation (mastery and extrinsic), on perceived social norms regarding cheating, on attitudes about cheating, and on knowledge of institutional policy regarding cheating behavior. All 5 factors were significant predictors of cheating rates. In addition, cheaters were found lower in mastery motivation and higher in extrinsic motivation in courses in which they cheated than in courses in which they did not cheat. Cheaters, in courses in which they cheated, (...)
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  39.  31
    Jamee Gresley, Heidi Wallace, Julie M. Hupp & Sara Staats (2009). Heroes Don't Cheat: An Examination of Academic Dishonesty and Students' Views on Why Professors Don't Report Cheating. Ethics and Behavior 19 (3):171-183.
    Some students do not cheat. Students high in measures of bravery, honesty, and empathy, our defining characteristics of heroism, report less past cheating than other students. These student heroes also reported that they would feel more guilt if they cheated and also reported less intent to cheat in the future than nonheroes. We find general consensus between students and professors as to reasons for the nonreporting of cheating, suggesting a general impression of insufficient evidence, lack of courage, and (...)
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  40.  13
    Peter W. Schuhmann, Robert T. Burrus, Preston D. Barber, J. Edward Graham & M. Fara Elikai (2013). Using the Scenario Method to Analyze Cheating Behaviors. Journal of Academic Ethics 11 (1):17-33.
    Using student self-reported cheating admissions and answers from a hypothetical cheating scenario, this paper analyzes the effects of individual and situational factors on potential cheating behavior. Results confirm several conclusions about student factors that are related to cheating. The probability of cheating is associated with younger students, lower GPAs, alcohol consumption, fraternity/sorority membership, and having cheated in high school. Student perceptions of the certainty and severity of punishment appear to have a negative and significant impact (...)
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  41.  26
    David A. Rettinger, Kristina Ryan, Kristopher Fulks, Anna Deaton, Jeffrey Barnes & Jillian O'Rourke (2010). Imitation Is the Sincerest Form of Cheating: The Influence of Direct Knowledge and Attitudes on Academic Dishonesty. Ethics and Behavior 20 (1):47-64.
    What effect does witnessing other students cheat have on one's own cheating behavior? What roles do moral attitudes and neutralizing attitudes (justifications for behavior) play when deciding to cheat? The present research proposes a model of academic dishonesty which takes into account each of these variables. Findings from experimental (vignette) and survey methods determined that seeing others cheat increases cheating behavior by causing students to judge the behavior less morally reprehensible, not by making rationalization easier. Witnessing cheating (...)
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  42.  28
    Richard A. Bernardi, Ania V. Baca, Kristen S. Landers & Michael B. Witek (2008). Methods of Cheating and Deterrents to Classroom Cheating: An International Study. Ethics and Behavior 18 (4):373 – 391.
    This study examines the methods students use to cheat on class examinations and suggests ways of deterring using an international sample from Australia, China, Ireland, and the United States. We also examine the level of cheating and reasons for cheating that prior research has highlighted as a method of demonstrating that our sample is equivalent to those in prior studies. Our results confirm the results of prior research that primarily employs students from the United States. The data indicate (...)
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  43.  19
    David A. Rettinger, Kristina Ryan, Kristopher Fulks, Anna Deaton, Jeffrey Barnes & Jillian O'Rourke (2010). Imitation Is the Sincerest Form of Cheating: The Influence of Direct Knowledge and Attitudes on Academic Dishonesty. Ethics and Behavior 20 (1):47-64.
    What effect does witnessing other students cheat have on one's own cheating behavior? What roles do moral attitudes and neutralizing attitudes (justifications for behavior) play when deciding to cheat? The present research proposes a model of academic dishonesty which takes into account each of these variables. Findings from experimental (vignette) and survey methods determined that seeing others cheat increases cheating behavior by causing students to judge the behavior less morally reprehensible, not by making rationalization easier. Witnessing cheating (...)
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  44.  32
    Vivien K. G. Lim & Sean K. B. See (2001). Attitudes Toward, and Intentions to Report, Academic Cheating Among Students in Singapore. Ethics and Behavior 11 (3):261 – 274.
    In this study, we examined students' attitudes toward cheating and whether they would report instances of cheating they witnessed. Data were collected from three educational institutions in Singapore. A total of 518 students participated in the study. Findings suggest that students perceived cheating behaviors involving exam-related situations to be serious, whereas plagiarism was rated as less serious. Cheating in the form of not contributing one's fair share in a group project was also perceived as a serious (...)
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  45.  34
    Jason M. Stephens, Michael F. Young & Thomas Calabrese (2007). Does Moral Judgment Go Offline When Students Are Online? A Comparative Analysis of Undergraduates' Beliefs and Behaviors Related to Conventional and Digital Cheating. Ethics and Behavior 17 (3):233 – 254.
    This study provides a comparative analysis of students' self-reported beliefs and behaviors related to six analogous pairs of conventional and digital forms of academic cheating. Results from an online survey of undergraduates at two universities (N = 1,305) suggest that students use conventional means more often than digital means to copy homework, collaborate when it is not permitted, and copy from others during an exam. However, engagement in digital plagiarism (cutting and pasting from the Internet) has surpassed conventional plagiarism. (...)
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  46.  79
    Mia Consalvo (2005). Rule Sets, Cheating, and Magic Circles: Studying Games and Ethics. International Review of Information Ethics 4 (2):7-12.
    This paper provides frameworks for understanding how ethics might be expressed in gameplay situations, and how we can study the ethical frameworks that games offer to players. There are many ways to delve into such topics, and this paper considers only a few approaches. It briefly surveys some of the important ques-tions and critiques arising from audience studies, theories of play and games, and work on cheating, and begins to build a framework for considering ethics in relation to games (...)
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  47.  15
    J. S. Russell (2013). Is There a Normatively Distinctive Concept of Cheating in Sport (or Anywhere Else)? Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 41 (3):1-21.
    This paper argues that for the purposes of any sort of serious discussion about immoral conduct in sport very little is illuminated by claiming that the conduct in question is cheating. In fact, describing some behavior as cheating is typically little more than expressing strong, but thoroughly vague and imprecise, moral disapproval or condemnation of another person or institution about a wide and ill-defined range of improper advantage-seeking behavior. Such expressions of disapproval fail to distinguish cheating from (...)
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  48.  13
    Patricia Keith-Spiegel, Barbara G. Tabachnick, Bernard E. Whitley Jr & Jennifer Washburn (1998). Why Professors Ignore Cheating: Opinions of a National Sample of Psychology Instructors. Ethics and Behavior 8 (3):215 – 227.
    To understand better why evidence of student cheating is often ignored, a national sample of psychology instructors was sampled for their opinions. The 127 respondents overwhelmingly agreed that dealing with instances of academic dishonesty was among the most onerous aspects of their profession. Respondents cited insufficient evidence that cheating has occurred as the most frequent reason for overlooking student behavior or writing that might be dishonest. A factor analysis revealed 4 other clusters of reasons as to why (...) may be ignored. Emotional reasons included stress and lack of courage. Difficult reasons included the extensive time and effort required to deal with cheating students. Fear reasons included concern about retaliation or a legal challenge. Denial reasons included beliefs that cheating students would fail anyway and that the worst offenders do not get caught. The reasons why instances of academic dishonesty should be proactively confronted are presented. (shrink)
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  49.  14
    Chun-Hua Hsiao & Chyan Yang (2011). The Impact of Professional Unethical Beliefs on Cheating Intention. Ethics and Behavior 21 (4):301 - 316.
    The phenomenon of academic dishonesty among college students is prevalent, but its damage cannot be underestimated because the students' decisions to cheat were related to decisions to engage in similar unethical behavior in the workplace after graduation. To examine the influential factors of the cheating intention among part-time students with several years of work experience, we included an additional variable?unethical beliefs related to the workplace (professional unethical beliefs) into the theory of planned behavior. First-year business students on the job (...)
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    Stephen B. Salter, Daryl M. Guffey & Jeffrey J. McMillan (2001). Truth, Consequences and Culture: A Comparative Examination of Cheating and Attitudes About Cheating Among U.S. And U.K. Students. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 31 (1):37-50.
    As Post observes, accounting firms are unique among multinationals. They are more likely than firms in almost any other category to go abroad. They also have less choice in location as their expansion is determined largely by the desired locations of their clients. Given the widespread global presence of such firms, it can be argued that the global audit firm is uniquely at risk from variations in ethical perceptions across nations. This study extends the U.S. accounting literature on determinants of (...)
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