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Cheryl Cline [5]Cheryl A. Cline [1]
  1. Barbara Secker, Cécile Bensimon, Cheryl Cline, Dianne Godkin, Ann Heesters & Kevin Reel (2014). Examining Methods to Assess Core Knowledge Competencies: A Canadian Perspective. American Journal of Bioethics 14 (1):30-33.
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  2. Cheryl Cline (2013). Global Health Ethics. In Hugh LaFollette (ed.), The International Encyclopedia of Ethics. Wiley-Blackwell.
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  3. Cheryl Cline, Andrea Frolic & Robert Sibbald (2013). Beyond Trail Blazing: A Roadmap for New Healthcare Ethics Leaders (and the People Who Hire Them). [REVIEW] HEC Forum 25 (3):211-227.
    This article is intended to serve as a roadmap to help new healthcare ethics leaders establish or renew an ethics program in a healthcare organization. The authors share a systemic step-by-step process for navigating this early career passage. In this paper, we describe five critical success strategies and provide explanations and concrete tools to help get you on the road to success as quickly and painlessly as possible. We will discuss how to define your role; diagnose your organization’s needs; build (...)
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  4. Cheryl Cline (2012). Why Some Conflicts Involving “'Difficult' Patients” Should Remain Outside the Province of the Ethics Consultation Service. American Journal of Bioethics 12 (5):16-18.
    The American Journal of Bioethics, Volume 12, Issue 5, Page 16-18, May 2012.
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  5. Cheryl Cline, Ann Heesters, Barbara Secker & Andrea Frolic (2012). Education for Ethics Practice: Tailoring Curricula to Local Needs and Objectives. [REVIEW] HEC Forum 24 (3):227-243.
    Currently, there is no authoritative credentialing process for individuals engaged in ethics practice, no accreditation system that sets minimum education standards for programs aiming to prepare these individuals for their work, and little evidence available that any particular training model is actually achieving its pedagogical goals. At the same time, a number of healthcare organizations and universities now routinely offer post-graduate programs, clinical fellowships and in-house training specifically devised to prepare graduates for ethics practice. However, while their numbers appear to (...)
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  6. Cheryl A. Cline (2007). Biotechnology and the New Right: A Progressive Red Herring? American Journal of Bioethics 7 (10):15 – 17.
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