8 found
Sort by:
Disambiguations:
Cheryl Hall [7]Cheryl Ann Hall [1]
  1. Cheryl Hall (2013). What Will It Mean to Be Green? Envisioning Positive Possibilities Without Dismissing Loss. Ethics, Policy and Environment 16 (2):125 - 141.
    Convinced of the importance of framing, many environmentalists have begun emphasizing positive visions of a happy and healthy green future rather than gloomy pictures of deprivation and sacrifice. ?Gloom and doom? discourses foster despair and resistance, they worry, instead of hope and motivation to change. While positive visions are crucial, though, it is ineffective to deny that living more sustainably will involve any loss. Since people value many incompatible things, living more sustainably will inevitably entail both sacrifice and reward. Environmentalists (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Cheryl Hall (2010). The Habitual Route to Environmentally Friendly (or Unfriendly) Happiness. Ethics, Place and Environment 13 (1):19 – 22.
    I agree with Andreou that people are 'highly adaptable when it comes to material goods.' But I would supplement her point about the influence of social comparisons on experiences of happiness with a point about the influence of habit. Andreou does briefly mention habituation, arguing that 'a good will give one less happiness once one has gotten used to having it.' While this may be true, though, it is also true that one's sense of how necessary a good is to (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Cheryl Ann Hall (2007). Recognizing the Passion in Deliberation: Toward a More Democratic Theory of Deliberative Democracy. Hypatia 22 (4):81-95.
    : Critics have suggested that deliberative democracy reproduces inequalities of gender, race, and class by privileging calm rational discussion over passionate speech and action. Their solution is to supplement deliberation with such forms of emotional expression. Hall argues that deliberation already inherently involves passion, a point that is especially important to recognize in order to deconstruct the dichotomy between reason and passion that plays a central role in reinforcing inequalities of gender, race, and class in the first place.
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Cheryl Hall (2002). 'Passions and Constraint': The Marginalization of Passion in Liberal Political Theory. Philosophy and Social Criticism 28 (6):727-748.
    Positive arguments on behalf of passion are scarce in liberal political theory. Rather, liberal theorists tend to push passion to the margins of their theories of politics, either by ignoring it or by explicitly arguing that passion poses a danger to politics and is best kept out of the public realm. The purpose of this essay is to criticize these marginalizations and to illustrate their roots in impoverished conceptions of passion. Using a richer conception of passion as the desire for (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Cheryl Hall (2000). Feminism's Essential Eros. The Proceedings of the Twentieth World Congress of Philosophy 2000:11-20.
    This essay examines the feminist literature on ‘eros’ inspired primarily by Audre Lorde’s essay, “Uses of the Erotic: The Erotic as Power.” The central argument of this literature is that “our erotic knowledge empowers us” by guiding and inspiring us to pursue what we truly value in life. This literature is useful in emphasizing a human quality that is often overlooked, even by other feminists. Yet it is plagued by the prevailing assumption that our deepest passions and desires will necessarily (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Cheryl Hall (1998). Preface. Hypatia 13 (3):vii-vii.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Cheryl Hall (1998). Politics, Ethics, and the 'Uses of the Erotic': Why Feminist Theorists Need to Think About the Psyche. In Bat-Ami Bar On & Ann Ferguson (eds.), Daring to Be Good: Essays in Feminist Ethico-Politics. Routledge. 3--14.
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Cheryl Hall (1997). Preface. Hypatia 12 (4):vii-vii.