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Cheryl Hughes [8]Cheryl L. Hughes [3]
  1. Cheryl Hughes (2007). Defining and Prosecuting International Crimes. Social Philosophy Today 23:231-235.
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  2. Cheryl L. Hughes (2005). Hobbes and Levinas. In Claire Elise Katz & Lara Trout (eds.), Emmanuel Levinas. Routledge. 2--145.
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  3. Cheryl Hughes & Andrew Light (2003). Preface. Social Philosophy Today 19:5-5.
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  4. Heidi Grasswick, Cressida J. Heyes, Cheryl L. Hughes, Alison M. Jaggar, Marìa Pìa Lara, Bonnie Mann, Norah Martin, Diana Tietjens Meyers, Kate Parsons, Misha Strauss, Margaret Urban Walker, Abby Wilkerson & IrisMarion Young (2002). Recognition, Responsibility, and Rights: Feminist Ethics and Social Theory. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
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  5. Cheryl Hughes (2002). Preface. Social Philosophy Today 18:5-5.
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  6. Cheryl Hughes & James Wong (2001). Preface. Social Philosophy Today 17:5-5.
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  7. Cheryl Hughes (2000). Introduction. Social Philosophy Today 16:1-8.
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  8. Cheryl Hughes (2000). Preface. Social Philosophy Today 16:5-5.
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  9. Cheryl Hughes (1999). Reconstructing the Subject of Human Rights. Philosophy and Social Criticism 25 (2):47-60.
    Recent philosophical criticisms of individual rights and the postmodern deconstruction of the sovereign subject raise serious questions for the defense of universal human rights. This paper critically examines Paul Ricoeur's effort to reconstruct a viable notion of the human subject as the bearer of human rights. Ricoeur's analysis of the narrative structure of human experiences and action takes account of the recent philosophical criticisms of sovereign subjectivity; it avoids both the fiction of the atomistic individual of liberal political philosophy and (...)
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  10. Cheryl Hughes (1998). Human Rights, State Sovereignty, and Worid Community. Social Philosophy Today 14:101-119.
  11. Cheryl L. Hughes (1998). The Primacy of Ethics: Hobbes and Levinas. [REVIEW] Continental Philosophy Review 31 (1):79-94.
    At several points in his writings, Levinas is implicitly critical of Hobbes's view that the political order is required to restrict violent conflict and competition and make morality possible. This paper makes Levinas's criticisms explicit by comparing Hobbes's descriptions of human nature and human relations with Levinas's radically different descriptions of the ethical relation of responsibility and the consequent kinship of the human community. I use insights from Levinas to argue that ethics cannot be reduced to politics and that the (...)
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