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Cheryl Misak [52]Cheryl J. Misak [5]
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Profile: Cheryl Misak (University of Toronto)
  1.  8
    Cheryl Misak (2013). The American Pragmatists. OUP Oxford.
    Cheryl Misak presents a history of the great American philosophical tradition of pragmatism, from its inception in the 1870s to the present day. She traces the connections between classical American pragmatism and contemporary analytic philosophy, and draws out the continuing influence of pragmatist ideas in the recent history of philosophy.
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  2.  7
    Cheryl J. Misak, Douglas B. White & Robert D. Truog (2016). Medically Inappropriate or Futile Treatment: Deliberation and Justification. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 41 (1):90-114.
    This paper reframes the futility debate, moving away from the question “Who decides when to end what is considered to be a medically inappropriate or futile treatment?” and toward the question “How can society make policy that will best account for the multitude of values and conflicts involved in such decision-making?” It offers a pragmatist moral epistemology that provides us with a clear justification of why it is important to take best standards, norms, and physician judgment seriously and a clear (...)
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  3. Cheryl J. Misak (2004). Making Disagreement Matter: Pragmatism and Deliberative Democracy. Journal of Speculative Philosophy 18 (1):9 - 22.
  4.  6
    Cheryl J. Misak (2010). Narrative Evidence and Evidence‐Based Medicine. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 16 (2):392-397.
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  5. Cheryl Misak (2008). A Culture of Justification: The Pragmatist's Epistemic Argument for Democracy. Episteme 5 (1):pp. 94-105.
    The pragmatist view of politics is at its very heart epistemic, for it treats morals and politics as a kind of deliberation or inquiry, not terribly unlike other kinds of inquiry. With the exception of Richard Rorty, the pragmatists argue that morals and politics, like science, aim at the truth or at getting things right and that the best method for achieving this aim is a method they sometimes call the scientific method or the method of intelligence – what would (...)
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  6.  23
    Cheryl Misak (2015). Klein on James on the Will to Believe. Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science 5 (1):118-28.
    This commentary explores the disagreement between Alex Klein and Cheryl Misak about the core insights of American Pragmatism, against a background of agreement. Both take the history of early American pragmatism to be a vital part of the history of analytic philosophy, not a radical break with it. But Misak argues that James seeks to loosen the usual epistemic standards so that religious and scientific belief can both be justified by a unitary set of evidentiary rules, and Klein argues that (...)
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  7. Cheryl Misak (1987). Peirce, Levi, and the Aims of Inquiry. Philosophy of Science 54 (2):256-265.
    Isaac Levi uses C. S. Peirce's fallibilism as a foil for his own "epistemological infallibilism". I argue that Levi's criticisms of Peirce do not hit their target, and that the two pragmatists agree on the fundamental issues concerning background knowledge, certainty, revision of belief, and the aims of inquiry.
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  8. Cheryl Misak (2008). Pragmatism on Solidarity, Bullshit, and Other Deformities of Truth. Midwest Studies in Philosophy 32 (1):111-121.
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  9.  63
    Cheryl Misak (2005). Icu Psychosis and Patient Autonomy: Some Thoughts From the Inside. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 30 (4):411 – 430.
    I shall draw on my experience of being an ICU patient to make some practical, ethical, and philosophical points about the care of the critically ill. The recurring theme in this paper is ICU psychosis. I suggest that discharged patients ought to be educated about it; I discuss the obstacles in the way of accurately measuring it; I argue that we must rethink autonomy in light of it; and I suggest that the self disintegrates in the face of it.
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  10.  26
    Cheryl Misak (2005). Pragmatism and Pluralism. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 41 (1):129 - 135.
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  11. Cheryl Misak (2002). Truth, Politics, Morality: Pragmatism and Deliberation. Routledge.
    Cheryl Misak argues that truth ought to be reinstated to a central position in moral and political philosophy. She argues that the correct account of truth is one found in a certain kind of pragmatism: a true belief is one upon which inquiry could not improve, a belief which would not be defeated by experience and argument. This account is not only an improvement on the views of central figures such as Rawls and Habermas, but it can also make sense (...)
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  12.  12
    Cheryl Misak (1998). Deflating Truth: Pragmatism Vs. Minimalism. The Monist 81 (3):407 - 425.
  13.  73
    Cheryl Misak (1986). Book-Reviews. Mind 95 (377):138-140.
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  14.  9
    Cheryl Misak (2008). Experience, Narrative, and Ethical Deliberation. Ethics 118 (4):614-632.
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  15.  18
    Cheryl Misak (1994). Pragmatism and the Transcendental Turn in Truth and Ethics. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 30 (4):739 - 775.
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  16.  11
    Cheryl Misak (2005). Psicosi in Terapia Intensiva ed autonomia del paziente: Alcune riflessioni dall'interno. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 30:411-430.
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  17.  46
    Cheryl Misak (2011). 2011 Presidential Address: American Pragmatism and Indispensability Arguments. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 47 (3):261-273.
    In the early- to mid- 1870s, William James started to argue that if one needs to believe something, then one ought to believe it, even if there is no evidence in its favor. It is not easy to unwind the various things that James said about what he called the will to believe, but one thing is clear. He was initially tempted to put forward a very strong point and despite the refinements he was eventually to make, his is the (...)
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  18.  26
    Cheryl Misak (1990). Pragmatism and Bivalence. International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 4 (2):171 – 179.
    Abstract The success of the pragmatic account of truth is often thought to founder on the principle of bivalence?the principle which holds that every genuine statement in the indicative mood is either true or false. For pragmatists must, it seems, claim that the principle does not hold for theoretical statements and observation statements about the past. That is, it seems that pragmatists must deny objective truth?values to these perfectly respectable sorts of hypotheses. In this paper, after examining three pragmatist attitudes (...)
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  19.  19
    Cheryl Misak & Robert B. Talisse (2014). Debate: Pragmatist Epistemology and Democratic Theory: A Reply to Eric MacGilvray. Journal of Political Philosophy 22 (3):366-376.
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  20.  3
    Cheryl Misak (2006). Isaac Levi and His Pragmatist Lineage. In Erik J. Olsson (ed.), Knowledge and Inquiry: Essays on the Pragmatism of Isaac Levi. Cambridge University Press 18--31.
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  21.  20
    Cheryl Misak (2012). The Pragmatic Maxim. The Harvard Review of Philosophy 17 (1):76-87.
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  22.  49
    Cheryl Misak (2002). Review: Truth, Rationality and Pragmatism: Themes From Peirce. [REVIEW] Mind 111 (441):119-122.
  23. Cheryl Misak (2007). Pragmatism and Deflationism. In C. J. Misak (ed.), New Pragmatists. Oxford University Press 68--90.
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  24.  1
    Cheryl Misak (2004). 6 CS Peirce on Vital Matters1. In C. J. Misak (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Peirce. Cambridge University Press 150.
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  25. Cheryl Misak (2004). 1 Charles Sanders Peirce 1839-1914). In C. J. Misak (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Peirce. Cambridge University Press 1.
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  26.  30
    Cheryl Misak (2008). A CULTURE OF JUSTIFICATION: THE PRAGMATIST'S EPISTEMIC ARGUMENT FOR DEMOCRACY11.This Paper has Been Improved by the Comments of David Dyzenhaus and David Estlund. Some of the Material is Drawn From Misak (2000) and (in Press). [REVIEW] Episteme 5 (1):94-105.
    The pragmatist view of politics is at its very heart epistemic, for it treats morals and politics as a kind of deliberation or inquiry, not terribly unlike other kinds of inquiry. With the exception of Richard Rorty, the pragmatists argue that morals and politics, like science, aim at the truth or at getting things right and that the best method for achieving this aim is a method they sometimes call the scientific method or the method of intelligence – what would (...)
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  27.  20
    Cheryl Misak (1998). Deflating Truth. The Monist 81 (3):407-425.
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  28.  25
    Cheryl Misak (2006). Review: Robert B. Westbrook. Democratic Hope: Pragmatism and the Politics of Truth. Ithaca and London: Cornell University Press, 2005. [REVIEW] Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 42 (2):279-282.
  29.  18
    Cheryl Misak (1992). Truth and Objectivity. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 22 (3):365-379.
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  30.  7
    Cheryl Misak (2013). Reply to Four Instructive Critics. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 49 (3):434-442.
    Allow me to begin by thanking Alex Klein, Bjorn Ramberg, Alan Richardson, and Robert Talisse for providing such an excellent set of commentaries on The American Pragmatists, as well as Henry Jackman, for organizing the session at the Canadian Philosophical Association meetings that provided the first forum for the discussion. In this response, I will speak to the general meta-philosophical questions posed by the four commentators, as well as to the more local challenges set to me.All the authors, in different (...)
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  31. Cheryl Misak (1992). Isaac Levi, The Fixation of Belief and Its Undoing: Changing Beliefs Through Inquiry Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 12 (3):205-206.
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  32.  22
    Cheryl Misak (2007). Review of T. L. Short, Peirce's Theory of Signs. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2007 (7).
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  33.  9
    Cheryl Misak (1999). How Not to Think of Convergence on the Truth. Modern Schoolman 76 (2-3):133-140.
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  34.  2
    Cheryl Misak (2010). The Pragmatic Maxim: How to Get Leverage on a Concept. The Harvard Review of Philosophy 17 (1):76-87.
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  35.  1
    Cheryl Misak (2014). Pragmatism and Inquiry: Selected Essays, by Isaac Levi. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2012, 260 Pp., ISBN13: 9780199698134, Hb $65. [REVIEW] European Journal of Philosophy 22:e11-e14.
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  36.  2
    Cheryl Misak (1992). Critical Notice. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 22 (3):365-379.
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  37.  3
    Cheryl Misak (2005). Rescher and Objective Pragmatism. Contemporary Pragmatism 2 (2):25-33.
    Nicholas Rescher embraces a more objectivist, realist, analytic pragmatism than the pragmatism which has been in vogue in the last two decades. He rejects any pragmatism for which there is no truth, reality, or objectivity but only conversations or solidarity within this or that vocabulary. Rescher has argued that pragmatism, far from being anti-realist, provides the only good argument for realism and for our ability to operate the causal model of inquiry about the real world. I examine this kind of (...)
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  38. Cheryl Misak (1985). Leigh S. Cauman, Isaac Levi, Charles D. Parsons and Robert Schwartz, Eds., How Many Questions?: Essays in Honour of Sidney Morgenbesser Reviewed By. [REVIEW] Philosophy in Review 5 (1):7-9.
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  39.  5
    Cheryl Misak (1994). William James: Pragmatism in Focus. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 25 (1):123-129.
  40. Cheryl Misak (1990). DS Clarke, Jr., Rational Acceptance and Purpose: An Outline of a Pragmatist Epistemology Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 10 (2):52-54.
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  41. William J. FitzPatrick, Cheryl Misak, Mark Greene, Daniel Statman, Brian Barry & Kimberley Brownlee (2008). 10. Kristin Shrader‐Frechette, Taking Action, Saving Lives: Our Duties to Protect Environmental and Public Health Kristin Shrader‐Frechette, Taking Action, Saving Lives: Our Duties to Protect Environmental and Public Health (Pp. 757-761). [REVIEW] Ethics 118 (4).
     
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  42. Cheryl Misak (2008). A Culture of Justification: The Pragmatist’s Epistemic Argument for Democracy. Episteme: A Journal of Social Epistemology 5 (1):94-105.
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  43. Cheryl Misak (2009). Anti-Metaphysics II : Verificationism and Kindred Views. In Robin Le Poidevin (ed.), The Routledge Companion to Metaphysics. Routledge
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  44. Cheryl Misak (1993). C.F. Delaney, "Science, Knowledge, and Mind: A Study in the Philosophy of C.S. Peirce". [REVIEW] Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 29 (3):457.
     
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  45. Cheryl Misak (2002). C.S. Peirce On Vital Matters: C. S. Peirce Sobre Assuntos Vitais. Cognitio 3.
    : C.S. Peirce is infamous for his assertion that the ideas of truth and belief are out of place in vital or ethical matters. We must go on instinct and custom. But he also asserts that his view of truth is applicable to ethics - a true belief about what is right or wrong is the belief that would stand up to all deliberation, experience and argument. I shall resolve this tension in Peirce's work in favor of the cognitivist reading. (...)
     
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  46. Cheryl Misak (1995). Frederick F. Schmitt, Truth: A Primer Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 15 (3):209-211.
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  47. Cheryl Misak (1995). Frederick F. Schmitt, Truth: A Primer. [REVIEW] Philosophy in Review 15:209-211.
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  48. Cheryl Misak (1989). Judgement and Justification. Philosophical Books 30 (2):107-109.
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  49. Cheryl Misak (ed.) (2009). New Pragmatists. Oxford University Press Uk.
    Pragmatism is the view that our philosophical concepts must be connected to our practices - philosophy must stay connected to first-order inquiry, to real examples, to real-life expertise. The classical pragmatists, Charles Sanders Peirce, William James, and John Dewey, put forward views of truth, rationality, and morality that they took to be connected to, and good for, our practices of inquiry and deliberation. In this volume, some of our very best contemporary philosophers explore this and develop the pragmatist project, showing (...)
     
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  50. Cheryl Misak (ed.) (2007). New Pragmatists. Oxford University Press Uk.
    Pragmatism is the view that our philosophical concepts must be connected to our practices - philosophy must stay connected to first order inquiry, to real examples, to real-life expertise. The classical pragmatists, Charles Sanders Peirce, William James, and John Dewey, put forward views of truth, rationality, and morality that they took to be connected to, and good for, our practices of inquiry and deliberation.When Richard Rorty, the best-known contemporary pragmatist, looks at our practices, he finds that we don't aim at (...)
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