Search results for 'Chess' (try it on Scholar)

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Profile: Gavin Chess (Humber College of Applied Arts and Technology)
  1. Stella Chess (1987). Let Us Consider the Roles of Temperament and of Fortuitous Events. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 10 (1):21.score: 30.0
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  2. Stella Chess (1984). What Do We Learn From the Strange Situation? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 7 (1):148.score: 30.0
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  3. Barbara Montero & C. Evans (2011). Intuitions Without Concepts Lose the Game: Mindedness in the Art of Chess. [REVIEW] Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 10 (2):175-194.score: 24.0
    To gain insight into human nature philosophers often discuss the inferior performance that results from deficits such as blindsight or amnesia. Less often do they look at superior abilities. A notable exception is Herbert Dreyfus who has developed a theory of expertise according to which expert action generally proceeds automatically and unreflectively. We address one of Dreyfus’s primary examples of expertise: chess. At first glance, chess would seem an obvious counterexample to Dreyfus’s view since, clearly, chess experts (...)
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  4. Paul Coates (2013). Chess, Imagination, and Perceptual Understanding. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 73:211-242.score: 24.0
    Chess is sometimes referred to as a ‘mind-sport’. Yet, in obvious ways, chess is very unlike physical sports such as tennis and soccer; it doesn't require the levels of fitness and athleticism necessary for such sports. Nor does it involve the sensory-governed, skilled behaviour required in activities such as juggling or snooker. Nevertheless, I suggest, chess is closer than it may at first seem to some of these sporting activities. In particular, there are interesting connections between the (...)
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  5. Michael H. Connors, Bruce D. Burns & Guillermo Campitelli (2011). Expertise in Complex Decision Making: The Role of Search in Chess 70 Years After de Groot. Cognitive Science 35 (8):1567-1579.score: 24.0
    One of the most influential studies in all expertise research is de Groot’s (1946) study of chess players, which suggested that pattern recognition, rather than search, was the key determinant of expertise. Many changes have occurred in the chess world since de Groot’s study, leading some authors to argue that the cognitive mechanisms underlying expertise have also changed. We decided to replicate de Groot’s study to empirically test these claims and to examine whether the trends in the data (...)
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  6. Alexandre Linhares (2005). An Active Symbols Theory of Chess Intuition. Minds and Machines 15 (2):131-181.score: 24.0
    The well-known game of chess has traditionally been modeled in artificial intelligence studies by search engines with advanced pruning techniques. The models were thus centered on an inference engine manipulating passive symbols in the form of tokens. It is beyond doubt, however, that human players do not carry out such processes. Instead, chess masters instead carry out perceptual processes, carefully categorizing the chunks perceived in a position and gradually building complex dynamic structures to represent the subtle pressures embedded (...)
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  7. Gary Winship (2011). Chess & Schizophrenia: Murphy V Mr Endon, Beckett V Bion. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities 32 (4):339-351.score: 24.0
    This paper reconvenes Samuel Beckett’s psychotherapy with Wilfred Bion during 1934–1936 during which time Beckett’s conceived and began writing this second novel, Murphy . Based on Beckett’s visits to the Bethlem & Maudsley Hospital and his observation of the male nurses, the climax of Murphy is a chess match between Mr Endon (a male schizophrenic patient) and Murphy (a male psychiatric nurse). The precise notation of the Endon v Murphy chess match tells us that the Beckett intended it (...)
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  8. James Bartlett, Amy L. Boggan & Daniel C. Krawczyk (2013). Expertise and Processing Distorted Structure in Chess. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7:825.score: 24.0
    A classic finding in research on human expertise and knowledge is that of enhanced memory for stimuli in a domain of expertise as compared to either stimuli outside that domain, or within-domain stimuli that have been or degraded or distorted in some way. However, we do not understand how the expert brain processes within-domain stimuli that have been distorted enough to be perceived as impossible or wrong, and yet still are perceived as within the domain (e.g., a face with the (...)
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  9. Maria Juliana Leone, Agustin Petroni, Diego F. Fernandez Slezak & Mariano Sigman (2012). The Tell-Tale Heart: Heart Rate Fluctuations Index Objective and Subjective Events During a Game of Chess. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 24.0
    During a decision making process, the body changes. These somatic changes have been related to specific cognitive events and also have been postulated to assist decision making indexing possible outcomes of different options. We used chess to analyze heart rate (HR) modulations on specific cognitive events. In a chess game, players have a limited time-budget to make about 40 moves (decisions) that can be objectively evaluated and retrospectively assigned to specific subjectively perceived events, such as setting a goal (...)
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  10. L. Jonathan Cohen (1982). Chess as a Model of Language. Philosophia 11 (February):51-87.score: 21.0
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  11. Merim Bilalić, Peter McLeod & Fernand Gobet (2009). Specialization Effect and Its Influence on Memory and Problem Solving in Expert Chess Players. Cognitive Science 33 (6):1117-1143.score: 21.0
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  12. Johannes Rennig, Merim Bilalić, Elisabeth Huberle, Hans-Otto Karnath & Marc Himmelbach (2013). The Temporo-Parietal Junction Contributes to Global Gestalt Perception—Evidence From Studies in Chess Experts. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 21.0
  13. Merim Bilalić & Fernand Gobet (2009). They Do What They Are Told to Do: The Influence of Instruction on (Chess) Expert Perception—Commentary on Linhares and Brum (2007). Cognitive Science 33 (5):743-747.score: 21.0
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  14. J. Kadvany (2012). Chocolate and Chess (Unlocking Lakatos). [REVIEW] Philosophy of the Social Sciences 42 (2):276-286.score: 18.0
    Chocolate and Chess (Unlocking Lakatos) tells the fascinating story of Imre Lakatos’ life in Hungary before his flight to England following the failed 1956 Hungarian Revolution. The book focuses on Lakatos’ role as a political functionary under Hungarian Stalinism, and compiles what is known of Lakatos’ role in the induced suicide of a young woman, Éva Iszák, at the end of World War II. This historical and biographical study provides essential background for appreciating Lakatos’ cross-cultural role as a philosopher (...)
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  15. Arto Siitonen (1998). On the Philosophical Dimensions of Chess. Inquiry 41 (4):455 – 475.score: 18.0
    The paper discusses the relation between chess and philosophy, examining, among other things, how far chess might reveal important features of philosophical problemanalysis and argumentation. There is a plurality of scientific, philosophical, and other perspectives from which chess can be viewed. Some attention must be drawn to these various ways of conceptualizing the game, but the main emphasis of the paper lies in uncovering certain philosophically- and metaphilosophically- relevant basic assumptions of chess. It is argued that (...)
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  16. Fernand Gobet, Peter McLeod & Merim Bilalić (2011). Expert and “Novice” Problem Solving Strategies in Chess: Sixty Years of Citing de Groot (1946). Thinking and Reasoning 14 (4):395-408.score: 18.0
    In a famous study of expert problem solving, de Groot (1946/1978) examined how chess players found the best move. He reported that there was little difference in the way that the best players (Grand Masters) and very good players (Candidate Masters) searched the board. Although this result has been regularly cited in studies of expertise, it is frequently misquoted. It is often claimed that de Groot found no difference in the way that experts and novices investigate a problem. Comparison (...)
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  17. Benjamin Hale (ed.) (2008). Philosophy Looks at Chess. Open Court Press.score: 18.0
    This book offers a collection of contemporary essays that explore philosophical themes at work in chess. This collection includes essays on the nature of a game, the appropriateness of chess as a metaphor for life, and even deigns to query whether Garry Kasparov might—just might—be a cyborg. In twelve unique essays, contributed by philosophers with a broad range of expertise in chess, this book poses both serious and playful questions about this centuries-old pastime. -/- Perhaps more interestingly, (...)
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  18. Gary Banham (1999). Duchamp's “Mechanistic Sculptures”: Art, Nudes and the Game of Chess. Angelaki 4 (3):181 – 190.score: 18.0
    In this paper I present some reasons for seeing Duchamp's ready-mades as part of the history of sculpture and relate them to his engagement with both nudes and chess motifs.
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  19. Merim Bilali (2008). Expert and “Novice” Problem Solving Strategies in Chess: Sixty Years of Citing de Groot (1946). Thinking and Reasoning 14 (4):395 – 408.score: 18.0
    In a famous study of expert problem solving, de Groot (1946/1978) examined how chess players found the best move. He reported that there was little difference in the way that the best players (Grand Masters) and very good players (Candidate Masters) searched the board. Although this result has been regularly cited in studies of expertise, it is frequently misquoted. It is often claimed that de Groot found no difference in the way that experts and novices investigate a problem. Comparison (...)
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  20. Peter Kivy (2003). Another Go at Musical Profundity: Stephen Davies and the Game of Chess. British Journal of Aesthetics 43 (4):401-411.score: 18.0
    I have argued previously that the art of absolute music, unlike, for example, the art of literature, is not capable of profundity, which I characterized as treating a profound subject matter, at the highest artistic level, in a manner appropriate to its profundity. Stephen Davies has recently argued that there is another way of being profound, which he calls non-propositional profundity, and for which chess provides his principal example. He argues, further, that absolute music also exhibits this non-propositional profundity. (...)
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  21. J. Shand (2014). Predictive Mind, Cognition, and Chess. Analysis 74 (2):244-249.score: 18.0
    According to the ambitious Predictive Theory of the Mind the brain generates models that it tests against experience and corrects to makes them evermore probably accurate of encountered experience. It neatly explains why we cannot tickle ourselves. The convincingness of that example is compromised by its essentially non-cognitive nature whereby an explanation not involving predictive models might do just as well. More telling confirmation of the theory is the essentially cognitive phenomenon of our inability to play chess against ourselves. (...)
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  22. Maksymilian T. Madelr, Expertise and Error-Making in Chess.score: 18.0
    The aim of this paper is to illustrate, in some detail, the phenomenon of chess expertise and the making of errors by chess experts. In doing so, this paper also aims to reveal the close relationship between expertise and error making in chess. Finally, the paper aims to show how understanding that integral relationship can assist in the creation of pedagogical methods that can minimize error making, while also maximizing expertise. The analysis may provide some assistance in (...)
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  23. Roland Puccetti (1974). Pattern Recognition in Computers and the Human Brain:: With Special Application to Chess Playing Machines. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 25 (2):137-154.score: 18.0
    1 Matching Templates and Feature Analysers. 2 Modes of Perception in Left and Right Cerebral Hemispheres. 3 Identification and Recognition. 4 Chess Plying Machines.
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  24. Azlan Iqbal (2012). Knowledge Discovery in Chess Using an Aesthetics Approach. Journal of Aesthetic Education 46 (1):73-90.score: 18.0
    Computational aesthetics is a relatively new subfield of artificial intelligence (AI). It includes research that enables computers to "recognize" (and evaluate) beauty in various domains such as visual art, music, and games. Aside from the benefit this gives to humans in terms of creating and appreciating art in these domains, there are perhaps also philosophical implications about the nature and "mechanics" of aesthetic perception in humans. We can, potentially, learn more about ourselves as we replicate or simulate this ability in (...)
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  25. Selmer Bringsjord, Chess Isn't Tough Enough: Better Games for Mind-Machine Competition.score: 18.0
    That Strong AI is still alive may have a lot to do with its avoidance of true tests. When Kasparov sits down to face the meanest chessbot in town, he has the deck stacked against him: his play may involve super-computation, but we know that perfect chess can be played by a nite-state automaton, so Kasparov loses if the engineers are su - ciently clever : : : (Bringsjord, 1997b), p. 9; para-.
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  26. Merim Bilalic & Peter McLeod (2006). How Intellectual is Chess? -- A Reply to Howard. Journal of Biosocial Science 38 (3):419-421.score: 18.0
    Howard's (2005) claim that male dominance in chess is 'consistent with the evolutionary psychology view that males predominate at high achievement levels at least partly because of ability differences' (p. 378) is based on the premise that top level chess skill depends on a high level of IQ and visuospatial abilities. This premise is not supported by empirical evidence. In 1927 Djakow et al. first showed that world-class chess players do not have exceptional intellectual abilities. This finding (...)
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  27. Deborah P. Vossen (2008). Chess is Not a Game. In Benjamin Hale (ed.), Philosophy Looks at Chess. Open Court Press. 191--208.score: 18.0
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  28. Maurice Mandelbaum (1968). Language and Chess: De Saussure's Analogy. Philosophical Review 77 (3):356-357.score: 15.0
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  29. R. M. Cook (1954). H. J. R. Murray: A History of Board-Games Other Than Chess. Pp. Xiv+267; 86 Figs. London: Oxford University Press, 1952. Cloth, 42s. Net. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 4 (02):180-181.score: 15.0
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  30. Paul Erickson (2012). Von Neumann, Morgenstern, and the Creation of Game Theory: From Chess to Social Science, 1900–1960, Robert Leonard, Cambridge University Press, 2010, X + 390 Pages. [REVIEW] Economics and Philosophy 28 (1):87-92.score: 15.0
    Book Reviews Paul Erickson, Economics and Philosophy , FirstView Article(s).
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  31. Anne Wagner (2002). The Legal Discourse of the Common Law: A Game of Chess. International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 15 (4):345-360.score: 15.0
    English law, like any otherspecialized topic, needs a particular languagefor its understanding. The legal discourse ofthe common law gathers a set of theoretical andcustomary mechanisms subject to internal orexternal intrusions into its directions foruse. Two ideas are highlighted: the rigidity ofthe overall regulating structure of the law,and the use of `fuzzy sets' to provideflexibility to legal discourse. This unsteadyor fuzzy discourse production proves thislanguage to be the result of a long and complexhistorical process of socialisation. Theseinteractions of reference and of (...)
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  32. C. P. Ravilious (1994). The Aesthetics of Chess and the Chess Problem. British Journal of Aesthetics 34 (3):285-290.score: 15.0
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  33. Nicholas Denyer (1981). Chess and Life: The Structure of a Moral Code. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 82:59 - 68.score: 15.0
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  34. W. Ross Ashby (1952). Can a Mechanical Chess-Player Outplay its Designer? British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 3 (9):44-57.score: 15.0
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  35. P. N. Humble (1993). Chess as an Art Form. British Journal of Aesthetics 33 (1):59-66.score: 15.0
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  36. P. N. Humble (1995). The Aesthetics of Chess: A Reply to Ravilious. British Journal of Aesthetics 35 (4):390-394.score: 15.0
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  37. Heather J. Gert (1998). Anger and Chess. Midwest Studies in Philosophy 22 (1):249-265.score: 15.0
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  38. Dianne Horgan (1992). Lessons From Chess. Inquiry 10 (2):5-8.score: 15.0
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  39. J. B. S. Haldane (1952). The Mechanical Chess-Player. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 3 (10):189-191.score: 15.0
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  40. María J. Leone, Agustín Petroni, Diego Fernandez Slezak & Mariano Sigman (2012). The Tell-Tale Heart: Heart Rate Fluctuations Index Objective and Subjective Events During a Game of Chess. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 15.0
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  41. Roland Puccetti (1980). The Chess Room: Further Demythologizing of Strong AI. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 3 (3):441.score: 15.0
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  42. Harold Osborne (1964). Notes on the Aesthetics of Chess and the Concept of Intellectual Beauty. British Journal of Aesthetics 4 (2):160-163.score: 15.0
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  43. Virgil C. Aldrich (1957). Chess Not Without the Queen. Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 31:23 - 43.score: 15.0
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  44. W. E. Hick (1953). The Mechanical Chess-Player. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 3 (12):353-355.score: 15.0
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  45. Merim Bilalić & Peter Mcleod (2007). Participation Rates and the Difference in Performance of Women and Men in Chess. Journal of Biosocial Science 39 (5):789.score: 15.0
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  46. W. C. Brice & H. J. R. Murray (1954). A History of Board-Games Other Than Chess. Journal of Hellenic Studies 74:219.score: 15.0
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  47. Olivia Remie Constable (2007). Chess and Courtly Culture in Medieval Castile: The Libro de Ajedrez of Alfonso X, El Sabio. Speculum 82 (2):301-347.score: 15.0
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  48. P. N. Humble (1998). Marcel Duchamp: Chess Aesthete and Anartist Unreconciled. Journal of Aesthetic Education 32:41-56.score: 15.0
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  49. Veljko Jeremic, Dragan Vukmirovic & Zoran Radojicic (2010). Does Playing Blindfold Chess Reduce the Quality of Game: Comments on Chabris and Hearst (2003). Cognitive Science 34 (1):1-9.score: 15.0
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  50. Andrei Marmor (2006). How Law is Like Chess. Legal Theory 12 (4).score: 15.0
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