Search results for 'Chiwook Won' (try it on Scholar)

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Profile: Chiwook Won (Korea Institute for Advanced Study)
  1. Chiwook Won (2014). Overdetermination, Counterfactuals, and Mental Causation. Philosophical Review 123 (2):205-229.score: 240.0
    The overdetermination problem has long been raised as a challenge to nonreductive physicalism. Nonreductive physicalists have, in various ways, tried to resolve the problem through appeal to counterfactuals. This essay does two things. First, it takes up the question whether counterfactuals can yield an appropriate notion of causal redundancy and argues for a negative answer. Second, it examines how this issue bears on the mental causation debate. In particular, it considers the argument that the overdetermination problem simply does not arise (...)
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  2. Chiwook Won (2009). Morgenbesser's Coin, Counterfactuals, and Causal Versus Probabilistic Independence. Erkenntnis 71 (3):345 - 354.score: 240.0
    It is widely held that, as Morgenbesser’s case is usually taken to show, considerations of causal or probabilistic dependence should enter into the evaluation of counterfactuals. This paper challenges that idea. I present a modified version of Morgenbesser’s case and show how probabilistic approaches to counterfactuals are in serious trouble. Specifically, I show how probabilistic approaches run into a dilemma in characterizing probabilistic independence. The modified case also illustrates a difficulty in defining causal independence. I close with a suggestion for (...)
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  3. Hye Young Won (2008). The Psychic Power of Buddha in the Early Buddhism Community. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 6:287-288.score: 30.0
    The author of this paper aimed to understand the early Buddhism community in its entirety by examining the individual episodes in the "Mahavagga". There is a remarkable experience of the psychic power between the Buddha and the Brahmins. They are both aware of coming across of psychic forces that entered the way to the Buddhist Community. Using the brahmins mythology as a instrument for missionary work, the early Buddhism brings people close to Buddha's community. The Buddha visited Uruvela-Kassapa and took (...)
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  4. Hye-Young Won (2008). 초기 교단에 붓다의 신통력이 미친 영향. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 6:305-316.score: 30.0
    The author of this paper aimed to understand the early Buddhism community in its entirety by examining the individual episodes in the "Mahavagga". There is a remarkable experience of the psychic power between the Buddha and the Brahmins. They are both aware of coming across of psychic forces that entered the way to the Buddhist Community. Using the brahmins mythology as a instrument for missionary work, the early Buddhism brings people close to Buddha's community. The Buddha visited Uruvela-Kassapa and took (...)
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  5. Jin Kwak, Soohyun Oh & Dongho Won (2006). Minisymposia-XV Approaches or Methods of Security Engineering (AMSE)-Efficient Key Distribution Protocol for Electronic Commerce in Mobile Communications. In O. Stock & M. Schaerf (eds.), Lecture Notes in Computer Science. Springer-Verlag. 3732--1009.score: 30.0
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  6. Yong-jin Wŏn & Kyu-ch'an Chŏn (eds.) (2006). Sinhwa Ŭi Ch'urak, Kugik Ŭi Yuryŏng: Hwang U-Sŏk, Kŭrigo Han'guk Ŭi Chŏnŏlliŭm. Hannarae.score: 30.0
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  7. Chu-Yong Wŏn (2008). Tongyang Ŭi Chihye, Kŭrigo Hyŏndaein Ŭi Sam. HanʼGuk Haksul Chŏngbo.score: 30.0
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  8. Shinae Won (2008). John D. Caputo's Undecidability and Flux Model for Korean Christian Educators. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 24:53-61.score: 30.0
    The goal of this thesis is to undo those assumptions about understanding and the doxastic and social relationships that are concomitant with those assumptions, while offering a different way of construing understanding that is conducive to allowing Christian religious educators to move forward in their work, especially as that work concerns intergenerational strife. This rewriting of our notions of understanding and relationship will be in a direction wherein thedistinctions between faith, knowledge, self-understanding, enculturation, and ethical choice are blurred. Accordingly, this (...)
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  9. is Happiness Heritable or Hard Won & Reflections On Kevin (1998). Reviews and Evaluations of Articles. Ultimate Reality and Meaning 21:326.score: 30.0
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  10. Jennie Louise (2009). I Won't Do It! Self-Prediction, Moral Obligation and Moral Deliberation. Philosophical Studies 146 (3):327 - 348.score: 18.0
    This paper considers the question of whether predictions of wrongdoing are relevant to our moral obligations. After giving an analysis of ‘won’t’ claims (i.e., claims that an agent won’t Φ), the question is separated into two different issues: firstly, whether predictions of wrongdoing affect our objective moral obligations, and secondly, whether self-prediction of wrongdoing can be legitimately used in moral deliberation. I argue for an affirmative answer to both questions, although there are conditions that must be met for self-prediction to (...)
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  11. I. I. I. Costs, Modal Statements Are About What Could Have Been: Hitler Could Have Won World War II; I Could Have Been a Fisherman; the Speed of Light Could Have Been Twice as Fast as It Actually is; Swans Could..score: 18.0
    Hitler could have won World War II; I could have been a fisherman; The speed of light could have been twice as fast as it actually is; Swans could have been black; It’s impossible for there to be round squares; Necessarily, 2+2=4. Modal statements also include counterfactual statements: Scientific: If the speed of light were faster, atomic explosions would be more deadly; Ethical: If you hadn’t have made the deceased play on the motorway, he would’ve lived; Everyday: If I hadn’t (...)
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  12. James Robert Brown (1992). Why Empiricism Won't Work. PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1992:271 - 279.score: 18.0
    Thought experiments provide us with scientific understanding and theoretical advances which are sometimes quite significant, yet they do this without new empirical input, and possibly without any empirical input at all. How is this possible? The challenge to empiricism is to give an account which is compatible with the traditional empiricist principle that all knowledge is based on sensory experience. Thought experiments present an enormous challenge to empiricist views of knowledge; so much so that some of us have (cheerfully) thrown (...)
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  13. S. Katsuragi (1997). Better Working Conditions Won by 'Nurse Wave' Action: Japanese Nurses' Experience of Getting a New Law by Their Militant Campaign. Nursing Ethics 4 (4):313-322.score: 18.0
    Japanese nurses, like their counterparts in many other countries, are suffering from staff shortages and severe working conditions. The Japan Federation of Medical Workers’ Unions (Nihon Iroren) launched a campaign in 1989 for nurses called the ‘Nurse Wave’. Their demands were many: to increase the numbers of nursing staff, the regulation of night shifts, the implementation of a five-day working week everywhere, a fair appraisal of nurses’ work, better vocational training, etc. Nurses in white uniforms assembled at meetings, marched and (...)
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  14. Chris Briggs (2011). “Can't Pay” and “Won't Pay” in the Medieval Village. Common Knowledge 17 (2):363-370.score: 18.0
    What happens when a debtor does not pay back what he or she owes? As Margaret Atwood's chapter on “The Shadow Side” shows, the unpaid debt—in the broadest sense—is a recurring theme of history and literature. This review essay looks at the fourteenth-century village, a world which, perhaps contrary to expectations, turns out to have been characterized by a large number of outstanding interpersonal debts of money and goods. We know about these debts because the creditors were obliged to use (...)
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  15. Frank J. Hoffman (2008). “Is Won Buddhism, Buddhism?”. In Bokin Kim (ed.), Won Buddhism in the U.S.: Issues and Visions for the Future.score: 18.0
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  16. David Enoch (2006). Agency, Shmagency: Why Normativity Won't Come From What is Constitutive of Action. Philosophical Review 115 (2):169-198.score: 15.0
    There is a fairly widespread—and very infl uential—hope among philosophers interested in the status of normativity that the solution to our metaethical and, more generally, metanormative problems will emerge from the philosophy of action. In this essay, I will argue that these hopes are groundless. I will focus on the metanormative hope, but—as will become clear—showing that the solution to our metanormative problems will not come from what is constitutive of action will also devastate the hope of gaining significant insight (...)
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  17. Neil Van Leeuwen (2009). Self-Deception Won't Make You Happy. Social Theory and Practice 35 (1):107-132.score: 15.0
    I argue here that self-deception is not conducive to happiness. There is a long train of thought in social psychology that seems to say that it is, but proper understanding of the data does not yield this conclusion. Illusion must be distinguished from mere imagining. Self-deception must be distinguished from self-inflation bias and from self-fulfilling belief. Once these distinctions are in place, the case for self-deception falls apart. Furthermore, by yielding false beliefs, self-deception undermines desire satisfaction. Finally, I argue for (...)
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  18. Stephen L. White (2002). Why the Property Dualism Argument Won't Go Away. Journal of Philosophy.score: 15.0
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  19. Steven Pinker (2004). Why Nature & Nurture Won't Go Away. Daedalus.score: 15.0
  20. Peter Achinstein (1992). Inference to the Best Explanation: Or, Who Won the Mill-Whewell Debate? Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 23 (2):349-364.score: 15.0
  21. Peter Forrest (2010). Why Richard Swinburne Won't 'Rot in Hell': A Defense of Tough-Minded Theodicy. [REVIEW] Sophia 49 (1):37-47.score: 15.0
    In his recent paper in Sophia , ‘Theodicy: The Solution to the Problem of Evil, or Part of the Problem?’ Nick Trakakis endorses the position that theodicy, whether intellectually successful or not, is a morally obnoxious enterprise. My aim in this paper is to defend theodicy from this accusation. I concede that God the Creator is a moral monster by human standards and neither to be likened to a loving parent nor imitated. Nonetheless, God is morally perfect. What is abhorrent (...)
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  22. Immanuel Kant (1974). On the Old Saw: That May Be Right in Theory but It Won't Work in Practice. Philadelphia,University of Pennsylvania Press.score: 15.0
    Kant replies to the claim that there is conflict between what moral theory demands and what we can do in practice.
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  23. Jerry Fodor & Ernie Lepore (2001). Why Compositionality Won't Go Away: Reflections on Horwich's 'Deflationary' Theory. Ratio 14 (4):350–368.score: 15.0
    Compositionality is the idea that the meanings of complex expressions (or concepts) are constructed from the meanings of the less complex expressions (or concepts) that are their constituents.1 Over the last few years, we have just about convinced ourselves that compositionality is the sovereign test for theories of lexical meaning.2 So hard is this test to pass, we think, that it filters out practically all of the theories of lexical meaning that are current in either philosophy or cognitive science. Among (...)
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  24. Maria Kronfeldner (2010). Won't You Please Unite? Darwinism, Cultural Evolution and Kinds of Synthesis. In A. Barahona, H.-J. Rheinberger & E. Suarez-Diaz (eds.), The Hereditary Hourglass: Genetics and Epigenetics, 1868-2000. Max Planck Insititute for the History of Science. 111-125.score: 15.0
    The synthetic theory of evolution has gone stale and an expanding or (re-)widening of it towards a new synthesis has been announced. This time, development and culture are supposed to join the synthesis bandwagon. In this article, I distinguish between four kinds of synthesis that are involved when we extend the evolutionary synthesis towards culture: the integration of fields, the heuristic generation of interfields, the expansion of validity, and the creation of a common frame of discourse or ‘big-picture’. These kinds (...)
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  25. Daniel Cohnitz (2004). Why Consistentism Won’T Work. In E. Weber & T. DeMey (eds.), Modal Epistemology. Koninklijke Vlaamse Academie van Belgie vor Wetenschappen en Kunsten.score: 15.0
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  26. Samir Okasha (2001). Why Won't the Group Selection Controversy Go Away? British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 52 (1):25-50.score: 15.0
    The group selection controversy is about whether natural selection ever operates at the level of groups, rather than at the level of individual organisms. Traditionally, group selection has been invoked to explain the existence of altruistic behaviour in nature. However, most contemporary evolutionary biologists are highly sceptical of the hypothesis of group selection, which they regard as biologically implausible and not needed to explain the evolution of altruism anyway. But in their recent book, Elliot Sober and David Sloan Wilson [1998] (...)
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  27. Neal Judisch (2008). Why 'Non-Mental' Won't Work: On Hempel's Dilemma and the Characterization of the 'Physical'. [REVIEW] Philosophical Studies 140 (3):299 - 318.score: 15.0
    Recent discussions of physicalism have focused on the question how the physical ought to be characterized. Many have argued that any characterization of the physical should include the stipulation that the physical is non-mental, and others have claimed that a systematic substitution of ‘non-mental’ for ‘physical’ is all that is needed for philosophical purposes. I argue here that both claims are incorrect: substituting ‘non-mental’ for ‘physical’ in the causal argument for physicalism does not deliver the physicalist conclusion, and the specification (...)
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  28. Tara A. Smith, Why Originalism Won't Die - Common Mistakes in Competing Theories of Judicial Interpretation.score: 15.0
    In the debate over proper judicial interpretation of the law, the doctrine of Originalism has been subjected to numerous, seemingly fatal criticisms. Despite the exposure of flaws that would normally bury a theory, however, Originalism continues to attract tremendous support, seeming to many to be the most sensible theory on offer. This paper examines its resilient appeal (with a particular focus on Scalia's Textualism).By surveying and identifying the fundamental weaknesses of three of the leading alternatives to Originalism (Popular Will theory, (...)
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  29. Julia Tanner (2008). Why I Won’T Hurt Your Felines? In Steven Hales (ed.), What Philosophy Can Tell You About Your Cat. Open Court Publishing.score: 15.0
    Some philosophers (such as Kant and Rawls) think it is only wrong to be cruel to cats because it will make one behave cruelly to humans. This explanation is unsatisfactory. Why? Because being cruel to your cat is a direct wrong to your cat regardless of the effects it has on other humans. Ascribing the wrongness of cruelty to the fact it will make one callous to other humans is to assess the character of the cruel person not the act (...)
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  30. Gert Biesta (2007). Why "What Works" Won't Work: Evidence-Based Practice and the Democratic Deficit in Educational Research. Educational Theory 57 (1):1-22.score: 15.0
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  31. Denis Dutton, Why Intentionalism Won't Go Away.score: 15.0
    Considering the philosophic intelligence that has set out to discredit it, intentionalism in critical interpretation has shown an uncanny resilience. Beginning perhaps most explicitly with the New Criticism, continuing through the analytic tradition in philosophy, and culminating most recently in deconstructionism, philosophers and literary theorists have kept under sustained attack the notion that authorial intention can provide a guide to interpretation, a criterion of textual meaning, or a standard for the validation of criticism. Yet intentionalist criticism still has avid theoretical (...)
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  32. Ronald B. de Sousa (2004). Rational Animals: What the Bravest Lion Won't Risk. Croatian Journal of Philosophy 4 (12):365-386.score: 15.0
    I begin with a rather unpromising dispute that Nozick once had with Ian Hacking in the pages of the London Review of Books, in which both vied with one another in their enthusiasm to repudiate the thesis that some human people or peoples are closer than others to animality. I shall attempt to show that one can build, on the basis of Nozick’s discussion of rationality, a defense of the view that the capacity tor language places human rationality out of (...)
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  33. Michael P. Wolf (2007). Reference and Incommensurability: What Rigid Designation Won't Get You. [REVIEW] Acta Analytica 22 (3):207-222.score: 15.0
    Causal theories of reference in the philosophy of language and philosophy of science have suggested that it could resolve lingering worries about incommensurability between theoretical claims in different paradigms, to borrow Kuhn’s terms. If we co-refer throughout different paradigms, then the problems of incommensurability are greatly diminished, according to causal theorists. I argue that assuring ourselves of that sort of constancy of reference will require comparable sorts of cross-paradigm affinities, and thus provides us with no special relief on this problem. (...)
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  34. William Lane Craig (2009). 'Noli Me Tangere': Why John Meier Won't Touch the Risen Lord. Heythrop Journal 50 (1):91-97.score: 15.0
    John Meier distinguishes ‘the real Jesus’ from ‘the historical Jesus’. Meier claims that whatever happened to the real Jesus after his death, his resurrection cannot belong to the historical Jesus because that event is in principle not open to the observation of any observer. But why think that the resurrection is not observable in this way? Meier finds justification in Gerald O'Collins' view that although the resurrection of Jesus is a real event, it is not an event in space and (...)
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  35. Peter Godfrey-Smith (1986). Why Semantic Properties Won't Earn Their Keep. Philosophical Studies 50 (September):223-36.score: 15.0
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  36. Steve Petersen (2006). Construing Faith as Action Won't Save Pascal's Wager. Philo 9 (2):221-229.score: 15.0
    Arthur Falk has proposed a new construal of faith according to which it is not a mere species of belief, but has essential components in action. This twist on faith promises to resurrect Pascal’s Wager, making faith compatible with reason by believing as the scientist but acting as the theist. I argue that Falk’s proposal leaves religious faith in no better shape; in particular, it merely reframes the question in terms of rational desires rather than rational beliefs.
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  37. Eugene G. D'Aquili & Andrew B. Newberg (1998). The Neuropsychological Basis of Religions, or Why God Won't Go Away. Zygon 33 (2):187-201.score: 15.0
  38. Richard Samuels (1998). What Brains Won't Tell Us About the Mind: A Critique of the Neurobiological Argument Against Representational Nativism. Mind and Language 13 (4):548-570.score: 15.0
  39. A. Wertheimer (2012). Voluntary Consent: Why a Value-Neutral Concept Won't Work. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 37 (3):226-254.score: 15.0
    Some maintain that voluntariness is a value-neutral concept. On that view, someone acts involuntarily if subject to a controlling influence or has no acceptable alternatives. I argue that a value-neutral conception of voluntariness cannot explain when and why consent is invalid and that we need a moralized account of voluntariness. On that view, most concerns about the voluntariness of consent to participate in research are not well founded.
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  40. Gert J. J. Biesta (2010). Why 'What Works' Still Won't Work: From Evidence-Based Education to Value-Based Education. [REVIEW] Studies in Philosophy and Education 29 (5):491-503.score: 15.0
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  41. Mary Midgley (2011). Why The Idea Of Purpose Won't Go Away. Philosophy 86 (04):545-561.score: 15.0
    Biologists' current habit of explaining each feature of human life separately through its evolutionary function — its assumed tendency to enhance each individual's reproductive prospects — is unworkable. It also sits oddly with these scientists' official rejection of teleology, since it treats all life as a process which does have an aim, namely, to perpetuate itself. But that aim is empty because it is circular. If we want to understand the behaviour of living things (including humans) we have to treat (...)
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  42. Yakir Levin & Itzhak Aharon (2011). What's on Your Mind? A Brain Scan Won't Tell. Review of Philosophy and Psychology 2 (4):699-722.score: 15.0
    Reverse Inference ( RI ) is an imaging-based type of inference from brain states to mental states, which has become highly widespread in neuroscience, most especially in neuroeconomics. Recent critical studies of RI may be taken to show that, if cautiously used, RI can help achieve research goals that may be difficult to achieve by way of behavior-based procedures alone. But can RI exceed the limits of these procedures and achieve research goals that are impossible for them to achieve alone? (...)
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  43. Bongkil Chung (1988). Won Buddhism: A Synthesis of the Moral Systems of Confucianism and Buddhism. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 15 (4):425-448.score: 15.0
  44. Anthony J. Cascardi & Denis Dutton, Why Intentionalism Won't Go Away.score: 15.0
    Considering the philosophic intelligence that has set out to discredit it, intentionalism in critical interpretation has shown an uncanny resilience. Beginning perhaps most explicitly with the New Criticism, continuing through the analytic tradition in philosophy, and culminating most recently in deconstructionism, philosophers and literary theorists have kept under sustained attack the notion that authorial intention can provide a guide to interpretation, a criterion of textual meaning, or a standard for the validation of criticism. Yet intentionalist criticism still has avid theoretical (...)
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  45. Francis Moorcroft (1993). Why Russell's Paradox Won't Go Away. Philosophy 68 (263):99 - 103.score: 15.0
  46. Bradley Armour-Garb (1999). Betting on God: Why Considerations of Simplicity Won't Help. Religious Studies 35 (2):119-138.score: 15.0
    In his famous Wager, Blaise Pascal attempted to adduce prudential grounds on which to base a belief in God. His argument founders, however, on the notorious 'Many Gods Problem', the problem of selecting among the many equiprobable gods on offer. Lycan and Schlesinger try to treat the Many Gods Problem as a problem of empirical over-determination, attempting to overcome it using methodologies familiar from empirical science. I argue that their strategy fails, but that the Many Gods Problem can be solved (...)
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  47. Brent Ranalli (2012). Climate Science, Character, and the "Hard-Won" Consensus. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 22 (2):183-210.score: 15.0
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  48. C. Kenneth Waters (1990). Why the Antireductionist Consensus Won't Survive the Case of Classical Mendelian Genetics. Philosophy of Science Association 1:125-39.score: 15.0
    Philosophers now treat the relationship between classical genetics and molecular biology as a paradigm of nonreduction and this example is playing an increasingly prominent role in debates about the reducibility of theories in other sciences. This paper shows that the anti-reductionist consensus about genetics will not withstand serious scrutiny. In addition to defusing the main anti-reductionist objections, this critical analysis uncovers tell-tale signs of a significant reduction in progress. It also identifies philosophical issues relevant to gaining a better understanding of (...)
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  49. Joanna J. Bryson (2010). Why Robot Nannies Probably Won't Do Much Psychological Damage. Interaction Studies 11 (2):196-200.score: 15.0
  50. Casey Haskins (2000). Paradoxes of Autonomy; or, Why Won't the Problem of Artistic Justification Go Away? Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 58 (1):1-22.score: 15.0
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