Search results for 'Choice (Psychology Mathematical models' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. John Dagsvik (1983). Discrete Dynamic Choice: An Extension of the Choice Models of Thurstone and Luce. I Kommisjon Hos H. Aschehoug Og Universitetsforlaget.
     
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    Geert de Soete, Hubert Feger & Karl C. Klauer (eds.) (1989). New Developments in Psychological Choice Modeling. Distributors for the United States and Canada, Elsevier Science Pub..
    A selection of 15 papers on choice modeling are presented in this volume.
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    Marc Scholten, Daniel Read & Adam Sanborn (2014). Weighing Outcomes by Time or Against Time? Evaluation Rules in Intertemporal Choice. Cognitive Science 38 (3):399-438.
    Models of intertemporal choice draw on three evaluation rules, which we compare in the restricted domain of choices between smaller sooner and larger later monetary outcomes. The hyperbolic discounting model proposes an alternative-based rule, in which options are evaluated separately. The interval discounting model proposes a hybrid rule, in which the outcomes are evaluated separately, but the delays to those outcomes are evaluated in comparison with one another. The tradeoff model proposes an attribute-based rule, in which both outcomes (...)
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  4. Itzhak Gilboa (2012). Rational Choice. The MIT Press.
    This book offers a rigorous, concise, and nontechnical introduction to some of the fundamental insights of rational choice theory. It draws on formal theories of microeconomics, decision making, games, and social choice, and on ideas developed in philosophy, psychology, and sociology. Itzhak Gilboa argues that economic theory has provided a set of powerful models and broad insights that have changed the way we think about everyday life. He focuses on basic insights of the rational choice paradigm--the (...)
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    Mike Page (2000). Connectionist Modelling in Psychology: A Localist Manifesto. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (4):443-467.
    Over the last decade, fully distributed models have become dominant in connectionist psychological modelling, whereas the virtues of localist models have been underestimated. This target article illustrates some of the benefits of localist modelling. Localist models are characterized by the presence of localist representations rather than the absence of distributed representations. A generalized localist model is proposed that exhibits many of the properties of fully distributed models. It can be applied to a number of problems that (...)
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  6. Patrick R. Laughlin (2011). Group Problem Solving. Princeton University Press.
    Experimental research by social and cognitive psychologists has established that cooperative groups solve a wide range of problems better than individuals. Cooperative problem solving groups of scientific researchers, auditors, financial analysts, air crash investigators, and forensic art experts are increasingly important in our complex and interdependent society. This comprehensive textbook--the first of its kind in decades--presents important theories and experimental research about group problem solving. The book focuses on tasks that have demonstrably correct solutions within mathematical, logical, scientific, or (...)
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    Marieke M. J. W. van Rooij, Luis H. Favela, MaryLauren Malone & Michael J. Richardson (2013). Modeling the Dynamics of Risky Choice. Ecological Psychology 25:293-303.
    Individuals make decisions under uncertainty every day. Decisions are based on in- complete information concerning the potential outcome or the predicted likelihood with which events occur. In addition, individuals’ choices often deviate from the rational or mathematically objective solution. Accordingly, the dynamics of human decision making are difficult to capture using conventional, linear mathematical models. Here, we present data from a 2-choice task with variable risk between sure loss and risky loss to illustrate how a simple nonlinear (...)
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    Alberto Peruzzi (2006). The Meaning of Category Theory for 21st Century Philosophy. Axiomathes 16 (4):424-459.
    Among the main concerns of 20th century philosophy was that of the foundations of mathematics. But usually not recognized is the relevance of the choice of a foundational approach to the other main problems of 20th century philosophy, i.e., the logical structure of language, the nature of scientific theories, and the architecture of the mind. The tools used to deal with the difficulties inherent in such problems have largely relied on set theory and its “received view”. There are specific (...)
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