Search results for 'Chris Chandler' (try it on Scholar)

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Profile: Christopher D. Chandler (University of Aberdeen)
  1. Chris Chandler, Jeff Brooks, Ryan Mulvaney & W. Pitt Derryberry (2009). Addressing the Relationships Among Moral Judgment Development, Authenticity, Nonprejudice, and Volunteerism. Ethics and Behavior 19 (3):201-217.score: 240.0
    This study addresses how moral judgment development, authenticity, and nonprejudice account for variance in scores pertaining to various motivational functions underlying volunteerism in order to clarify certain problems associated with previous research that has considered such relationships. In the study, 127 participants completed measurements that pertain to these constructs. Correlations revealed that moral judgment had a negligible relationship with both authenticity and nonprejudice, thereby affirming that the former construct is distinct from the latter two. Linear regression analyses supported that moral (...)
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  2. Chris E. Lalonde & Michael J. Chandler (1995). False Belief Understanding Goes to School: On the Social-Emotional Consequences of Coming Early or Late to a First Theory of Mind. Cognition and Emotion 9 (2-3):167-185.score: 240.0
  3. Chris E. Lalonde & Michael J. Chandler (1995). V6T 1Z4. Portions of These Data Were Presented at the Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development, Seattle, WA, April 1991. We Would Especially Like to Thank Our Colleagues Suzanne Hala and Anna Fritz, Who Helped to Fashion and Administer the Various Theory-of-Mind Measures Used in This Study. Our Gratitude is Also Extended to the Teachers. [REVIEW] Cognition and Emotion 9 (1-3):167-185.score: 240.0
  4. Bret Chandler (2010). The “Public” and “its” Ignorance: Reply to Wisniewski and Fenster. Critical Review 22 (1):85-96.score: 120.0
    In their debate about whether Cultural Studies is helpful for understanding public ignorance, Chris Wisniewski and Mark Fenster view ignorance as inevitably plaguing the public in mass democratic society; and they see ?the public? as an abstract entity. However, Pierre Bourdieu's sociology rightly contests these positions. A thorough investigation of the concrete social conditions of political ignorance reveals that ignorance is unevenly dispersed throughout social space and that its relevance depends on social position, such as that of the advantaged (...)
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  5. Geoffrey Chandler (1998). Oil Companies and Human Rights. Business Ethics 7 (2):69–72.score: 60.0
    The chairman of Amnesty International’s UK Business Group considers how oil companies must change their attitudes in a world which is changing faster. “Silence or inaction will be seen to provide comfort to oppression and may be adjudged complicity.” Sir Geoffrey Chandler CBE is a former senior executive of the Royal/Dutch Shell Group and architect of Shell’s first Statement of General Business Principles. This article is reprinted with permission from Oxford Energy Forum, November 1, 1997.
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  6. Daniele Archibugi & David Chandler (2009). A Dialogue on International Interventions: When Are They a Right or an Obligation? Ethics and Global Politics 2 (2).score: 60.0
    Edited by Nieves Zúñiga García-Falces. In 15 years, the international community has been blamed for resorting too easily to the use of force on some occasions (Iraq, Afghanistan, Kosovo), and also it has been blamed for intervening too late or not at all in other crises (Rwanda, Bosnia and today Sudan and Congo). Even today, one of the most contested questions of international politics is the legitimacy for the use of force. David Chandler, Professor of International Relations at the (...)
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  7. James K. Chandler, Arnold Ira Davidson & Harry D. Harootunian (eds.) (1994). Questions of Evidence: Proof, Practice, and Persuasion Across the Disciplines. University of Chicago Press.score: 60.0
    Biologists, historians, lawyers, art historians, and literary critics all voice arguments in the critical dialogue about what constitutes evidence in research and scholarship. They examine not only the constitution and "blurring" of disciplinary boundaries, but also the configuration of the fact-evidence distinctions made in different disciplines and historical moments the relative function of such concepts as "self-evidence," "experience," "test," "testimony," and "textuality" in varied academic discourses and the way "rules of evidence" are themselves products of historical developments. The essays and (...)
     
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  8. Ronnie Littlejohn & Marthe Chandler (eds.) (2008). Polishing the Chinese Mirror: Essays in Honor of Henry Rosemont, Jr. Global Scholarly Publications.score: 60.0
    Edited by Marthe Chandler and Ronnie Littlejohn, this work is a collection of expository and critical essays on the work of Henry Rosemont, Jr., a prominent and influential contemporary philosopher, activist, translator, and educator in the field of Asian and Comparative Philosophy. The essays in this collection take up three major themes in Rosemont's work: his work in Chinese linguistics, his contribution to the theory of human rights, and his interest in East Asian religion. Contributions include works by the (...)
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  9. Chris Wisniewski (2010). Ignorance and Culture: Rejoinder to Fenster and Chandler. Critical Review 22 (1):97-115.score: 42.0
    In the ongoing debate about the impact that studies of public ignorance should have on the study of culture, Mark Fenster and Bret Chandler assume that wider political participation must be our goal, because, to them, political ignorance is a culturally imposed, and therefore removable, obstacle?as if, without the baleful influence of culture, political participants would be well informed. Culture is indeed a primary influence on people's political opinions, so political scientists should indeed study the role it plays in (...)
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  10. Hugh S. Chandler, Martha Nussbaum and Alcibiades.score: 30.0
    Nussbaum seems to have had a spell during which she made villains heroes (and sometimes visa versa). Thus she has argued, in effect, that Steerforth is the hero of David Copperfield, and Heathcliff the most admirable character in Wuthering Heights. Here I discuss her more or less explicit claim that Alcibiades is the hero, (and Socrates the villain) in Plato’s Symposium. -/- .
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  11. Hugh S. Chandler, Parfit on Division.score: 30.0
    Parfit’s well known book, Reasons and Persons, argues, among other things, that ‘what matters’ in regard to ‘survival’ is not personal identity but something he calls ‘relation R.’ On this basis, plus other considerations, he rejects the ‘Self-interest’ theory as to what should be our aim in life. Here I show, or try to show, that his over-all argument is seriously defective. In particular, he fails to prove that personal identity is not what matters for survival.
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  12. Hugh Chandler (2010). Wittgenstein on the Resurrection. Philosophical Investigations 33 (4):321-338.score: 30.0
    Wittgenstein probably did not believe in Christ's Resurrection (as an historical event), but he may well have believed that if he had achieved a higher level of devoutness he would believe it. His view seems to have been that devout Christians are right in holding onto this belief tenaciously even though, in fact, it's false. It's historical falsity, is compatible with its religious validity, so to speak. So far as I can see, he did not think that devout Christians should (...)
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  13. Hugh S. Chandler, Putnam on Realism.score: 30.0
    In 1974 Putnam was a ‘realist’ in regard to the physical world. By 1981 he had become a 'non-realist' in this regard. (I don’t know where he stands today.) In this paper I argue that his realism was more plausible than his non-realism. The physical world is what it is independently of any rational being’s interpretation of it.
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  14. Hugh S. Chandler, How Many Minds?score: 30.0
    In Analysis, Vol. 45, June 1984, George Rea published a paper attacking my claim that there could be ‘indeterminate minds'. This paper is a reply to his attack. I claim, again, that such ‘minds’ are possible – entities such that it is indeterminate whether or not these entities are people with minds. -/- .
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  15. Hugh S. Chandler, Fuzzy Cooky-Cutter Classes.score: 30.0
    It seems clear that second order fuzziness (indeterminacy) is possible. There can be borderline cases of borderline cases. But how about third order cases? Is there no end of degrees of borderlinehood? I offer a somewhat strange little 'language game' that seems to suggest that the ascension ends with second order cases. (The 'game' is intended to be somewhat like a simplified version of color perception.).
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  16. Hugh S. Chandler (1975). Rigid Designation. Journal of Philosophy 72 (13):363-369.score: 30.0
    I have been told that for some twenty minutes after reading this paper Kripke believed I had shown that proper names could be non-rigid designators. (Then, apparently, he found a crucial error in the set-up.) I take great pride in this (alleged) fact.
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  17. Hugh Chandler, The Problem of Good.score: 30.0
    -/- Very few (if any) people believe that the world was created, and is maintained, by a thoroughly contemptible and malicious being. Do we have good reason for our disbelief? In the first part of this paper I offer an argument for the non-existence of such a being. According to this argument there is just too much good - too may good things - in the world for the ‘malicious being’ theory to be plausible. In the second part of the (...)
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  18. Jake Chandler (2009). Review of Franz Huber and Christoph Schmidt-Petri, Eds. Degrees of Belief. Philosophy in Review 296 (6):422-424.score: 30.0
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  19. Jake Chandler (2010). The Transmission of Support: A Bayesian Re-Analysis. [REVIEW] Synthese 176 (3):333 - 343.score: 30.0
    Crispin Wright’s discussion of the notion of ‘transmission-failure’ promises to have important philosophical ramifications, both in epistemology and beyond. This paper offers a precise, formal characterisation of the concept within a Bayesian framework. The interpretation given avoids the serious shortcomings of a recent alternative proposal due to Samir Okasha.
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  20. Hugh S. Chandler (1967). Excluded Middle. Journal of Philosophy 64 (24):807-814.score: 30.0
    This is a paper on borderline cases and the law of Excluded Middle. In it I try to make use of some long forgotten, but perhaps valuable, work on the topic – a bit of Hegel for instance.
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  21. John H. Chandler (1987). Androcentric Science? The Science Question in Feminism. Inquiry 30 (3):317 – 332.score: 30.0
  22. Teresa Chandler (2001). Kinds of Emotion. Biology and Philosophy 16 (1):109-115.score: 30.0
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  23. Jake Chandler (2010). The Lottery Paradox Generalized? British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 61 (3):667-679.score: 30.0
    In a recent article, Douven and Williamson offer both (i) a rebuttal of various recent suggested sufficient conditions for rational acceptability and (ii) an alleged ‘generalization’ of this rebuttal, which, they claim, tells against a much broader class of potential suggestions. However, not only is the result mentioned in (ii) not a generalization of the findings referred to in (i), but in contrast to the latter, it fails to have the probative force advertised. Their paper does however, if unwittingly, bring (...)
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  24. Douglas McKnight & Prentice Chandler (2012). The Complicated Conversation of Class and Race in Social and Curricular Analysis: An Examination of Pierre Bourdieu's Interpretative Framework in Relation to Race. Educational Philosophy and Theory 44 (5-6):74-97.score: 30.0
    As a means to challenge and diminish the hold of mainstream curriculum's claim of being a colorblind, politically neutral text, we will address two particular features that partially, though significantly, constitute the hidden curriculum in the United States—race and class—historically studied as separate social issues. Race and class have been embedded within the institutional curriculum from the beginning in the US; though rarely acknowledged as intertwined issues. We illustrate how the theoretical and interpretive structure of French philosopher and sociologist Pierre (...)
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  25. Hugh S. Chandler (1971). Constitutivity and Identity. Noûs 5 (3):313-319.score: 30.0
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  26. Hugh S. Chandler (1969). Shoemaker's Arguments Against Locke. Philosophical Quarterly 19 (76):263-265.score: 30.0
  27. Hugh S. Chandler (1986). Sources of Essence. Midwest Studies in Philosophy 11 (1):379-389.score: 30.0
    Almost everyone believes in modality de dicto. Necessarily, puppies are young dogs. The necessity here derives from the meaning of “puppy.” The term means young dog. Essentialism is belief in a more exotic sort of modality, one that does not derive from meaning in this direct and simple way. In the first two sections of this paper, I consider indexical and nonindexical kind terms and the sort of modality applicable to each. In the last section, I consider individuals and proper (...)
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  28. John H. Chandler (2010). Religious Reasons and Public Policy. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 91 (2):137-152.score: 30.0
    Most Liberals hold that public policies ought always be justifiable by reference to public reasons; that citizens should also refrain from advocacy in the absence of such reasons; and that exclusively religious reasons cannot be public reasons. This is challenged by Paul Weithman and Christopher Eberle. Both argue that basic liberal principles permit citizens in some circumstances to advance exclusively religious reasons, and in particular that Rawls's notions of reasonableness (Weithman) and the strains of commitment (Eberle) can be used in (...)
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  29. Hugh S. Chandler (1976). Plantinga and the Contingently Possible. Analysis 36 (2):106 - 109.score: 30.0
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  30. John H. Chandler (1973). Act-Utilitarianism and Collective Action. Ethics 84 (1):78-85.score: 30.0
  31. John H. Chandler (1990). Killing and Letting Die - Putting the Debate in Context. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 68 (4):420 – 431.score: 30.0
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  32. Hugh S. Chandler (1966). Three Kinds of Classses. American Philosophical Quarterly 3 (Jan):77-188.score: 30.0
    This is a boiled down version of my doctoral dissertation. Ryle wouldn’t publish it, claiming that it is like ‘a well sharpened pencil that no one will ever use.’ I guess he turned out to be right. Nevertheless I think it was, and is, a good paper.
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  33. Hugh S. Chandler (1975). Hedonism. American Philosophical Quarterly 12 (3):223-233.score: 30.0
  34. Marthe Chandler (1988). Models of Voting Behavior in Survey Research. Synthese 76 (1):25 - 48.score: 30.0
    This paper examines two models used in survey research to explain voting behavior. Although the models rely on the same data they make radically different predictions about the political future. Nevertheless, both models may be more or less correct. The models represent interacting systems and it may be impossible to get a super model of the interactions between their elements. In the natural sciences causal relationships between the elements of interacting models can often be ignored. Because voting behavior models describe (...)
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  35. Jennifer D. Chandler & John L. Graham (2010). Relationship-Oriented Cultures, Corruption, and International Marketing Success. Journal of Business Ethics 92 (2):251 - 267.score: 30.0
    This study explores the general problems associated with marketing across international markets and focuses specifically on the role of corruption in deterring international marketing success. The authors do this by introducing a broader conceptualization of corruption. The dimensions of corruption and their importance in explaining the exporters’ successes in international markets are developed empirically. Partial Least Squares formative indicators are used in a comprehensive model including consumer resources (wealth and information resources), physical distance (kilometers and time zones), and cultural distance (...)
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  36. Jerry L. R. Chandler (2009). Algebraic Biology: Creating Invariant Binding Relations for Biochemical and Biological Categories. [REVIEW] Axiomathes 19 (3):297-320.score: 30.0
    The desire to understand the mathematics of living systems is increasing. The widely held presupposition that the mathematics developed for modeling of physical systems as continuous functions can be extended to the discrete chemical reactions of genetic systems is viewed with skepticism. The skepticism is grounded in the issue of scientific invariance and the role of the International System of Units in representing the realities of the apodictic sciences. Various formal logics contribute to the theories of biochemistry and molecular biology (...)
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  37. John H. Chandler (1970). Incorrigibity and Classification. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 48 (May):101-6.score: 30.0
  38. Hugh S. Chandler (2007). Platonistic and Disenchanting Theories of Ethics. Peter Lang.score: 30.0
    In this book I try to defend a traditional kind of dualism in regard to ethical theory. The idea is that Conscience and Self-love offer distinct but rational and reasonable objectives in our decision-making. When they conflict, pure reason does not resolve the issue. With this picture in mind, I argue that a kind of Platonistic realism in regard to morality is (still) intellectually permissible – has not yet been defeated. That is to say, it is permissible to hold that (...)
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  39. Jake Chandler (2007). Solving the Tacking Problem with Contrast Classes. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 58 (3):489 - 502.score: 30.0
    The traditional Bayesian qualitative account of evidential support (TB) takes assertions of the form 'E evidentially supports H' to affirm the existence of a two-place relation of evidential support between E and H. The analysans given for this relation is $C(H,E) =_{def} Pr(H\arrowvertE) \models Pr(H)$ . Now it is well known that when a hypothesis H entails evidence E, not only is it the case that C(H,E), but it is also the case that C(H&X,E) for any arbitrary X. There is (...)
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  40. Hugh S. Chandler (1971). A Note in Defense of Personal Materialism. Philosophical Studies 22 (4):61 - 64.score: 30.0
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  41. John H. Chandler (1990). Feminism and Epistemology. Metaphilosophy 21 (4):367-381.score: 30.0
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  42. Sir Geoffrey Chandler (1993). Business and Human Rights. Business Ethics 2 (2):47–49.score: 30.0
  43. Hugh S. Chandler (1985). Book Review:God, Free Will, and Morality. Robert J. Richman. [REVIEW] Ethics 95 (3):743-.score: 30.0
  44. Marthe Chandler (1990). Attitudes, Leprechauns and Neutrinos: The Ontology of Behavioral Science. Philosophical Studies 60 (1-2):5 - 17.score: 30.0
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  45. Hugh S. Chandler (1993). Divine Intervention and the Origin of Life. Faith and Philosophy 10 (2):pp. 259-161.score: 30.0
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  46. Hugh S. Chandler (1966). Essence and Accident. Analysis 6 (6):77-81.score: 30.0
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  47. Marthe Chandler (2003). "Meno" and "Mencius:" Two Philosophical Dramas. Philosophy East and West 53 (3):367-398.score: 30.0
    The conversations between Meno and Socrates and between Mencius and King Xuan are philosophical dramas whose "plots" are intellectual arguments. Although both texts present historical characters at particular times in their lives, the texts were written some years after the events they describe by disciples of Socrates and Mencius. The authors had a number of motives: they wanted to represent what the characters thought and said, to explain the philosophical theories underlying the dramatic plots, and to justify the failure of (...)
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  48. David Chandler (2000). Will There Be a Trial for the Khmer Rouge? Ethics and International Affairs 14 (1):67–82.score: 30.0
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  49. David Chandler (2007). Potemkin Sovereignty: Statehood Without Politics in the New World Order. The Monist 90 (1):86-105.score: 30.0
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