Search results for 'Chris Foster' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Order:
  1.  21
    Chris Foster (2000). On Tarski's Theory of Logical Consequence. Southwest Philosophy Review 16 (1):125-132.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  2. Susanna Morton Braund, Sarah Knight, Serena Connolly, Matt Wille, Stephanie Suzanne Spaulding, Chris van den Berg, Isaac Meyers, Will Washburn, Brett Foster & Joseph Fouse (forthcoming). Twenty-First Century Persius. Arion 9 (3).
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  3. Michael Foster & Cameron Wybrow (1992). Creation, Nature, and Political Order in the Philosophy of Michael Foster the Classic Mind Articles and Others, with Modern Critical Essays. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  4. John Foster & J. S. Metcalfe (2004). Evolution and Economic Complexity / Edited by John Foster and J. Stanley Metcalfe.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  5. Mal Foster (2007). 67 Hal Foster. In Diarmuid Costello & Jonathan Vickery (eds.), Art: Key Contemporary Thinkers. Berg 67.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  6. Kenelm Foster (1951). The Sculpture of Anthony Foster. New Blackfriars 32 (372):119-123.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  7.  55
    John Foster (2004). The Divine Lawmaker: Lectures on Induction, Laws of Nature, and the Existence of God. Oxford University Press.
    John Foster presents a clear and powerful discussion of a range of topics relating to our understanding of the universe: induction, laws of nature, and the existence of God. He begins by developing a solution to the problem of induction - a solution whose key idea is that the regularities in the workings of nature that have held in our experience hitherto are to be explained by appeal to the controlling influence of laws, as forms of natural necessity. His (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   9 citations  
  8.  77
    John A. Foster (2000). The Nature of Perception. New York: Oxford University Press.
    John Foster addresses the question: what is it to perceive a physical object? He rejects the view that we perceive such objects directly, and argues for a new version of the traditional empiricist account, which locates the immediate objects of perception in the mind. But this account seems to imply that we do not perceive physical objects at all. Foster offers a surprising solution, which involves embracing an idealist view of the physical world.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   11 citations  
  9.  23
    John Foster (1991). The Immaterial Self: A Defence of the Cartesian Dualist Conception of the Mind. Routledge.
    Dualism argues that the mind is more than just the brain. It holds that there exists two very different realms, one mental and the other physical. Both are fundamental and one cannot be reduced to the other - there are minds and there is a physical world. This book examines and defends the most famous dualist account of the mind, the cartesian, which attributes the immaterial contents of the mind to an immaterial self. John Foster's new book exposes the (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   10 citations  
  10. John Foster (2008). A World for Us: The Case for Phenomenalistic Idealism. Oxford University Press.
    A World for Us aims to refute physical realism and establish in its place a form of idealism. Physical realism, in the sense in which John Foster understands it, takes the physical world to be something whose existence is both logically independent of the human mind and metaphysically fundamental. Foster identifies a number of problems for this realist view, but his main objection is that it does not accord the world the requisite empirical immanence. The form of idealism (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  11.  14
    R. Melvin Keiser, Durwood Foster, Richard Gelwick & Donald Musser (2010). More on Polanyi and Tillich on Participative Knowing. Tradition and Discovery 37 (3):19-27.
    This discussion, featuring short comments by R. Melvin Keiser, Durwood Foster, Richard Gelwick and Donald Musser, grew out of articles in TAD 35:3 (2008-2009) on connections and disconnections between the thought of Polanyi and Tillich (featuring essays by Foster and Gelwick with a response from Musser). Keiser raises questions about perspectives articulated in the earlier articles and Foster, Gelwick and Musser respond here.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  12. Roger S. Foster (2016). Adorno and Philosophical Modernism: The Inside of Things. Lexington Books.
    This book explores contemporary continental philosophy and aesthetics, focusing on the work of philosopher and musicologist Theodor W. Adorno. Roger Foster addresses the problem of post-Kantian reason in relation to the pathologies of experience, alienation, the transformative and ethical import of aesthetic experience, the relation between philosophy and social critique, and language as disclosure rather than correspondence.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  13. John Foster (2004). Divine Lawmaker. Oxford University Press Uk.
    John Foster presents a clear and powerful discussion of a range of topics relating to our understanding of the universe: induction, laws of nature, and the existence of God. He begins by developing a solution to the problem of induction - a solution whose key idea is that the regularities in the workings of nature that have held in our experience hitherto are to be explained by appeal to the controlling influence of laws, as forms of natural necessity. His (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  14. John Foster (2003). Nature of Perception. Oxford University Press Uk.
    John Foster presents a penetrating investigation into the question: what is it to perceive a physical object? Is perceptual contact with a physical object, he asks, something fundamental, or does it break down into further factors? If the latter, what are these factors, and how do they combine to secure the contact?For most of the book, Foster addressed these questions in the framework of a realist view of the physical world. But the arguments which thereby unfold - arguments (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  15. Matthew R. Foster (2016). The Human Relationship to Nature: The Limit of Reason, the Basis of Value, and the Crisis of Environmental Ethics. Lexington Books.
    Environmental problems compel examination of three contrasting patterns of moral reasoning concerning the human relationship to nature: the currently implemented Progress Ethic, and the proposed alternatives of a Stewardship Ethic and Connection Ethic. But none of these deliver all they promise, whether in theory or practice or both, because all dubiously presume that moral reason is commensurate with nature, and that the value of natural entities is an intrinsic property. Matthew R. Foster argues that resolution of this crisis requires (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  16. John Foster (2002). The Immaterial Self: A Defence of the Cartesian Dualist Conception of the Mind. Routledge.
    Dualism argues that the mind is more than just the brain. It holds that there exists two very different realms, one mental and the other physical. Both are fundamental and one cannot be reduced to the other - there are minds and there is a physical world. This book examines and defends the most famous dualist account of the mind, the cartesian, which attributes the immaterial contents of the mind to an immaterial self. John Foster's new book exposes the (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  17. John Foster (1996). The Immaterial Self: A Defence of the Cartesian Dualist Conception of the Mind. Routledge.
    Dualism argues that the mind is more than just the brain. It holds that there exists two very different realms, one mental and the other physical. Both are fundamental and one cannot be reduced to the other - there are minds and there is a physical world. This book examines and defends the most famous dualist account of the mind, the cartesian, which attributes the immaterial contents of the mind to an immaterial self. John Foster's new book exposes the (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  18. David H. Foster (2003). Does Colour Constancy Exist? Trends in Cognitive Sciences 7 (10):439-443.
    For a stable visual world, the colours of objects should appear the same under different lights. This property of colour constancy has been assumed to be fundamental to vision, and many experimental attempts have been made to quantify it. I contend here, however, that the usual methods of measurement are either too coarse or concentrate not on colour constancy itself, but on other, complementary aspects of scene perception. Whether colour constancy exists other than in nominal terms remains unclear.
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   7 citations  
  19. L. Susan Stebbing, T. E. Jessop, E. M. Whetnall, Michael B. Foster, A. C. Ewing, O. de Selincourt & John Laird (1928). New Books. [REVIEW] Mind 37 (148):506-519.
    No categories
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  20. C. Foster (1990). Algorithms, Abstraction and Implementation. Academic Press.
  21.  94
    T. E. Jessop, H. F. Hallett, Michael B. Foster, F. C. S. Schiller, James Drever, H. R. Mackintosh, Rex Knight, S. V. Keeling & E. J. Thomas (1930). New Books. [REVIEW] Mind 39 (153):101-120.
    No categories
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  22. M. B. Foster (1938). A Mistake of Plato's in the "Republic": A Rejoinder to Mr. Mabbott. Mind 47 (186):226-232.
    Direct download (11 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  23. John A. Foster (1991). The Immaterial Self: A Defense of the Cartesian Dualist Conception of Mind. Routledge.
    The Immaterial Self examines and defends this thesis, and in particular argues for its Cartesian version, which assigns the non-physical ingredients of the ...
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   23 citations  
  24. M. B. Foster (1935). Christian Theology and Modern Science of Nature (I.). Mind 44 (176):439-466.
    No categories
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  25. M. B. Foster (1936). Christian Theology and Modern Science of Nature (II.). Mind 45 (177):1-27.
    No categories
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  26.  30
    John A. Foster (1982). The Case for Idealism. Routledge.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   27 citations  
  27. M. B. Foster, H. R. MacKintosh, W. D. Lamont, A. C. Ewing, J. Drever, S. N. Dasgupta, John Laird & T. E. Jessop (1929). New Books. [REVIEW] Mind 38 (149):111-124.
    No categories
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  28. John Foster (2001). Regulatities, Laws of Nature, and the Existance of God. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 101 (2):145–161.
    The regularities in nature, simply by being regularities, call for explanation. There are only two ways in which we could, with any plausibility, try to explain them. One way would be to suppose that they are imposed on the world by God. The other would be to suppose that they reflect the presence of laws of nature, conceived of as forms of natural necessity. But the only way of making sense of the notion of a law of nature, thus conceived, (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  29.  45
    Kenneth R. Foster & Jan Jaeger (2008). Ethical Implications of Implantable Radiofrequency Identification (RFID) Tags in Humans. American Journal of Bioethics 8 (8):44 – 48.
    This article reviews the use of implantable radiofrequency identification (RFID) tags in humans, focusing on the VeriChip (VeriChip Corporation, Delray Beach, FL) and the associated VeriMed patient identification system. In addition, various nonmedical applications for implanted RFID tags in humans have been proposed. The technology offers important health and nonhealth benefits, but raises ethical concerns, including privacy and the potential for coercive implantation of RFID tags in individuals. A national discussion is needed to identify the limits of acceptable use of (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  30. M. B. Foster (1934). The Christian Doctrine of Creation and the Rise of Modern Natural Science. Mind 43 (172):446-468.
    No categories
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  31. Gary Foster (2009). Bestowal Without Appraisal: Problems in Frankfurt's Characterization of Love and Personal Identity. [REVIEW] Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 12 (2):153 - 168.
    Harry Frankfurt characterizes love as “a disinterested concern for the existence of what is loved, and for what is good for it.” As such, he views romantic love as an inauthentic paradigm for love since such love desires reciprocation, sexual gratification and so on. I argue that Frankfurt’s conception of love is (a) too general—he does not distinguish between the type of love one has for one’s partner, one’s country, a moral ideal, etc., (b) it overemphasizes the role of bestowal (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  32. Review author[S.]: John Foster (1994). In Defence of Phenomenalistic Idealism. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 54 (3):509-529.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  33.  90
    Roger Foster (2007). Adorno and Heidegger on Language and the Inexpressible. Continental Philosophy Review 40 (2):187-204.
    I argue that the reflections on language in Adorno and Heidegger have their common root in a modernist problematic that dissected experience into ordinary experience, and transfiguring experiences that are beyond the capacity for expression of our language. I argue that Adorno’s solution to this problem is the more resolutely “modernist” one, in that Adorno is more rigorous about preserving the distinction between what can be said, and what strives for expression in language. After outlining the definitive statement of this (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  34.  90
    John A. Foster (1993). Dennett's Rejection of Dualism. Inquiry 36 (1-2):17-31.
    In Consciousness Explained, Dennett elaborates and defends a materialist?functionalist account of the human mind, and of consciousness in particular. This defence depends crucially on his prior rejection of dualism. Dennett rejects this dualist alternative on three grounds: first, that its version of mind?to?body causation is in conflict with what we know, or have good reason to believe, from the findings of physical science; second, that the very notion of dualistic psychophysical causation is incoherent; and third, that dualism puts the mind (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  35.  29
    Virginia W. Gerde & R. Spencer Foster (2008). X-Men Ethics: Using Comic Books to Teach Business Ethics. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 77 (3):245 - 258.
    A modern form of narrative, comic books are used to communicate, discuss, and critique issues in business ethics and social issues in management. A description of comic books as a legitimate medium is followed by a discussion of the pedagogical uses of comic books and assessment techniques. The strengths of the pedagogy include crossing cultural barriers, understanding the complexity of individual decision-making and organizational influences, and the universality of dilemmas and values. We provide an initial source for educators on the (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  36. Deborah Faulkner & Jonathan K. Foster (2002). The Decoupling of "Explicit" and "Implicit" Processing in Neuropsychological Disorders: Insights Into the Neural Basis of Consciousness? Psyche 8 (2).
    A key element of the distinction between explicit and implicit cognitive functioning is the presence or absence of conscious awareness. In this review, we consider the proposal that neuropsychological disorders can best be considered in terms of a decoupling between preserved implicit or unconscious processing and impaired explicit or conscious processing. Evidence for dissociations between implicit and explicit processes in blindsight, amnesia, object agnosia, prosopagnosia, hemi-neglect, and aphasia is examined. The implications of these findings for a) our understanding of a (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  37.  45
    Cheryl Foster (1992). Schopenhauer's Subtext on Natural Beauty. British Journal of Aesthetics 32 (1):21-32.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  38.  76
    Roger Foster (2007). Adorno and Proust on the Recovery of Experience. Critical Horizons 8 (2):169-185.
    I argue in this paper that a recovery of the cognitive role of the experiencing subject is the common theme uniting Theodor Adorno's philosophy and Marcel Proust's literary project. This shared commitment is evidenced by the importance given by both thinkers to the expressive dimension of language in relation to its social function as a vehicle for communication. Furthermore, I argue that Adorno and Proust conceive of language's expressive dimension as the expression of suffering. However, whereas, for Proust, this means (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  39.  36
    Susanne E. Foster (2002). Aristotle and the Environment. Environmental Ethics 24 (4):409-428.
    There are three potential problems with using virtue theory to develop an environmental ethic. First, Aristotelian virtue theory is ratiocentric. Later philosophers have objected that Aristotle’s preference for reason creates a distorted picture of the human good. Overvaluing reason might well bias virtue theory against the value of non-rational beings. Second, virtue theory is egocentric. Hence, it is suited to developing a conception of the good life, but it is not suited to considering obligations to others. Third, virtue theory is (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  40.  62
    F. C. S. Schiller, Michael B. Foster, A. C. Ewing, W. D. Lamont, E. S. Waterhouse, A. E. Taylor, W. D. Ross, T. E. Jessop, C. D. Broad, S. S. & O. de Selincourt (1929). New Books. [REVIEW] Mind 38 (151):377-398.
    No categories
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  41.  36
    John A. Foster (1968). Psychophysical Causal Relations. American Philosophical Quarterly 5 (January):64-70.
  42.  58
    Lawrence Foster (1969). Feyerabend's Solution to the Goodman Paradox. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 20 (3):259-260.
  43.  61
    M. B. Foster (1951). On Plato's Conception of Justice in the Republic. Philosophical Quarterly 1 (3):206-217.
  44.  4
    Richard R. Sharp & Morris W. Foster (2006). Clinical Utility and Full Disclosure of Genetic Results to Research Participants. American Journal of Bioethics 6 (6):42 – 44.
  45.  27
    Cheryl Foster (1998). The Narrative and the Ambient in Environmental Aesthetics. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 56 (2):127-137.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  46.  7
    Juliet L. H. Foster (2003). Representational Projects and Interacting Forms of Knowledge. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 33 (3):231–244.
    This paper focuses on the concept of the reified and consensual universes in the theory of social representations, and the relationship between them. Having examined the different ways in which Moscovici discusses this concept, and the different ways in which these discussions have been interpreted, I will suggest that many of the criticisms levelled at this facet of social representations theory appear somewhat misplaced. However, it does seem that some aspects of the concept of the consensual and the reified universes (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  47.  30
    John A. Foster (2004). Reply to Armstrong. Harvard Review of Philosophy 12 (1):27-28.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  48.  12
    Richard R. Sharp & Morris W. Foster (2007). Grappling with Groups: Protecting Collective Interests in Biomedical Research. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 32 (4):321 – 337.
    Strategies for protecting historically disadvantaged groups have been extensively debated in the context of genetic variation research, making this a useful starting point in examining the protection of social groups from harm resulting from biomedical research. We analyze research practices developed in response to concerns about the involvement of indigenous communities in studies of genetic variation and consider their potential application in other contexts. We highlight several conceptual ambiguities and practical challenges associated with the protection of group interests and argue (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  49.  39
    Michael B. Foster (1931). The Concrete Universal: Cook Wilson and Bosanquet. Mind 40 (157):1-22.
    No categories
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  50.  13
    Sanjay K. Agarwal, Sylvia Estrada, Warren G. Foster, L. Lewis Wall, Doug Brown, Elaine S. Revis & Suzanne Rodriguez (2007). What Motivates Women to Take Part in Clinical and Basic Science Endometriosis Research? Bioethics 21 (5):263–269.
1 — 50 / 1000