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  1.  75
    Daniel C. Dennett & Chris Westbury (2000). Mining The Past To Construct The Future: Memory and Belief as Forms of Knowledge. In Daniel L. Schacter & Elaine Scarry (eds.), Memory, Brain, and Belief. Harvard Univ Pr 11--32.
    "The analogy between memory and a repository, and between remembering and retaining, is obvious and is to be found in all languages; it being natural to express the operations of the mind by images taken from things material. But in philosophy we ought to draw aside the veil of imagery, and to view them naked.".
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  2.  3
    Jamie Reilly, Jinyi Hung & Chris Westbury (2016). Non‐Arbitrariness in Mapping Word Form to Meaning: Cross‐Linguistic Formal Markers of Word Concreteness. Cognitive Science 40 (6):n/a-n/a.
    Arbitrary symbolism is a linguistic doctrine that predicts an orthogonal relationship between word forms and their corresponding meanings. Recent corpora analyses have demonstrated violations of arbitrary symbolism with respect to concreteness, a variable characterizing the sensorimotor salience of a word. In addition to qualitative semantic differences, abstract and concrete words are also marked by distinct morphophonological structures such as length and morphological complexity. Native English speakers show sensitivity to these markers in tasks such as auditory word recognition and naming. One (...)
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  3.  23
    Chris Westbury & Elena Nicoladis (2001). A Multiplicity of Constraints: How Children Learn Word Meaning. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (6):1122-1123.
    This book is an excellent and accessible overview of the position that children learn the meanings of words by applying a variety of nonlinguistic cognitive tools to the problem. We take issue with Bloom's emphasis on Theory of Mind as an explanatory mechanism for language learning; and with his claim that only unitary objects are nameable.
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  4.  8
    Chris Westbury (2002). Blind Men, Elephants, and Dancing Information Processors. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (5):645-646.
    Whatever else language may be, it is complex and multifaceted. Shanker & King (S&K) have tried to contrast a dynamic interactive view of language with an information processing view. I take issue with two main claims: first, that the dynamic interactive view of language is a “new paradigm” in either animal research or human language studies; and second, that the dynamic systems language-as-dance view of language is in any way incompatible with an information-processing view of language. That some information is (...)
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  5.  5
    Chris Westbury & Geoff Hollis (2005). In the Tiniest House of Time: Parametric Constraints in Evolutionary Models of Symbolization. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (4):513-514.
    Steels & Belpaeme (S&B) describe the role of genetic evolution in linguistic category sharing among a population of agents. We consider their methodology and conclude that, although it is plausible that genetic evolution is sufficient for such tasks, there is a bias in the presented work for such a conclusion to be reached. We suggest ways to eliminate this bias and make the model more convincingly relevant to the cognitive sciences.
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