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Profile: Christian Barry (Australian National University)
  1. Christian Barry (forthcoming). Review of Mathias Risse, On Global Justice. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews.
  2. Christian Barry, Matthew Lindauer & Gerhard Øverland (forthcoming). Doing, Allowing, and Enabling Harm: An Empirical Investigation. In Joshua Knobe, Tania Lombrozo & Shaun Nichols (eds.), Oxford Studies in Experimental Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
    Traditionally, moral philosophers have distinguished between doing and allowing harm, and have normally proceeded as if this bipartite distinction can exhaustively characterize all cases of human conduct involving harm. By contrast, cognitive scientists and psychologists studying causal judgment have investigated the concept ‘enable’ as distinct from the concept ‘cause’ and other causal terms. Empirical work on ‘enable’ and its employment has generally not focused on cases where human agents enable harm. In this paper, we present new empirical evidence to support (...)
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  3. Christian Barry & Kate Macdonald (forthcoming). How Should We Conceive of Individual Consumer Responsibility to Address Labour Injustices? In Yossi Dahan, Hanna Lerner & Faina Milman-Sivan (eds.), Global Justice and International Labour Rights. Cambridge.
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  4. Christian Barry & David Wiens (forthcoming). Benefiting From Wrongdoing and Sustaining Wrongful Harm. Journal of Moral Philosophy.
  5. Christian Barry & Gerhard Øverland (forthcoming). The Implications of Failing to Assist. Social Theory and Practice 40 (4).
  6. Christian Barry (2014). The Regulation of Harm in International Trade: A Critique of James's Collective Due Care Principle. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 44 (2):255-263.
  7. Christian Barry & Scott Wisor (2014). The Ethics of International Trade. In Darrel Moellendorf & Heather Widdows (eds.), Handbook of Global Ethics. Routledge.
  8. Robert E. Goodin & Christian Barry (2014). Benefiting From the Wrongdoing of Others. Journal of Applied Philosophy 31 (2):363-376.
    Bracket out the wrong of committing a wrong, or conspiring or colluding or conniving with others in their committing one. Suppose you have done none of those things, and you find yourself merely benefiting from a wrong committed wholly by someone else. What, if anything, is wrong with that? What, if any, duties follow from it? If straightforward restitution were possible — if you could just ‘give back’ what you received as a result of the wrongdoing to its rightful owner (...)
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  9. Christian Barry & Luara Ferracioli (2013). Young on Responsibility and Structural Injustice. [REVIEW] Criminal Justice Ethics 32 (3):247-257.
    Our aim in this essay is to critically examine Iris Young’s arguments in her important posthumously published book against what she calls the liability model for attributing responsibility, as well as the arguments that she marshals in support of what she calls the social connection model of political responsibility. We contend that her arguments against the liability model of conceiving responsibility are not convincing, and that her alternative to it is vulnerable to damaging objections.
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  10. Christian Barry & Scott Wisor (2013). Global Poverty. In Hugh LaFollette (ed.), The International Encyclopedia of Ethics. Wiley-Blackwell.
  11. Christian Barry & Scott Wisor (2013). World Trade Organization. In Hugh LaFollette (ed.), International Encyclopedia of Ethics. Wiley.
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  12. Christian Barry & Gerhard Øverland (2013). How Much for the Child? Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 16 (1):189-204.
    In this paper we explore what sacrifices you are morally required to make to save a child who is about to die in front of you. It has been argued that you would have very demanding duties to save such a child (or any adult who is in similar circumstance through no fault of their own, for that matter), and some examples have been presented to make this claim seem intuitively correct. Against this, we argue that you do not in (...)
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  13. Christian Barry (2012). Local Priorities, Universal Priorities, and Enabling Harm. Ethics and International Affairs 26 (1):21-26.
  14. Christian Barry & Holly Lawford-Smith (2012). Introduction. In Christian Barry & Holly Lawford-Smith (eds.), Global Justice. Ashgate.
    This volume brings together a range of influential essays by distinguished philosophers and political theorists on the issue of global justice. Global justice concerns the search for ethical norms that should govern interactions between people, states, corporations and other agents acting in the global arena, as well as the design of social institutions that link them together. The volume includes articles that engage with major theoretical questions such as the applicability of the ideals of social and economic equality to the (...)
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  15. Christian Barry & Holly Lawford-Smith (eds.) (2012). Global Justice. Ashgate.
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  16. Christian Barry & Gerhard Øverland (2012). Are Trade Subsidies and Tariffs Killing the Global Poor? Social Research (4):865-896.
    In recent years it has often been claimed that policies such as subsidies paid to domestic producers by affluent countries and tariffs on goods produced by foreign producers in poorer countries violate important moral requirements because they do severe harm to poor people, even kill them. Such claims involve an empirical aspect—such policies are on balance very bad for the global poor—and a philosophical aspect—that the causal influence of these policies can fairly be characterized as doing severe harm and killing. (...)
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  17. Christian Barry & Gerhard Øverland (2012). The Feasible Alternatives Thesis: Kicking Away the Livelihoods of the Global Poor. Politics, Philosophy and Economics 11 (1):97-119.
    Many assert that affluent countries have contributed in the past to poverty in developing countries through wars of aggression and conquest, colonialism and its legacies, the imposition of puppet leaders, and support for brutal dictators and venal elites. Thomas Pogge has recently argued that there is an additional and, arguably, even more consequential way in which the affluent continue to contribute to poverty in the developing world. He argues that when people cooperate in instituting and upholding institutional arrangements that foreseeably (...)
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  18. Jonathan Pickering & Christian Barry (2012). On the Concept of Climate Debt: Its Moral and Political Value. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 15 (5):667-685.
    A range of developing countries and international advocacy organizations have argued that wealthy countries, as a result of their greater historical contribution to human-induced climate change, owe a ?climate debt? to poor countries. Critics of this argument have claimed that it is incoherent or morally objectionable. In this essay we clarify the concept of climate debt and assess its value for conceptualizing responsibilities associated with global climate change and for guiding international climate negotiations. We conclude that the idea of a (...)
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  19. Christian Barry (2011). A Challenge to the Reigning Theory of the Just War. International Affairs 87 (2):457-466.
  20. Christian Barry (2011). Immigration and Global Justice. Global Justice Theory Practice Rhetoric 4 (1):30-38.
  21. Christian Barry, Redistribution. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
  22. Christian Barry (2011). Sovereign Debt, Human Rights, and Policy Conditionality. Journal of Political Philosophy 19 (3):282-305.
  23. Christian Barry & Matt Peterson (2011). Who Should Pay for the Damage of the Global Financial Crisis? In Ned Dobos Christian Barry & Thomas Pogge (eds.), Global Financial Crisis:The Ethical Issues. Palgrave.
  24. Christian Barry & Nicholas Southwood (2011). What Is Special About Human Rights? Ethics and International Affairs 25 (3):369-83.
    Despite the prevalence of human rights discourse, the very idea or concept of a human right remains obscure. In particular, it is unclear what is supposed to be special or distinctive about human rights. In this paper, we consider two recent attempts to answer this challenge, James Griffin’s “personhood account” and Charles Beitz’s “practice-based account”, and argue that neither is entirely satisfactory. We then conclude with a suggestion for what a more adequate account might look like – what we call (...)
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  25. Ned Dobos, Christian Barry & Thomas Winfried Menko Pogge (eds.) (2011). Global Financial Crisis: The Ethical Issues. Palgrave Macmillan.
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  26. Gerhard Øverland & Christian Barry (2011). Do Democratic Societies Have a Right to Do Wrong? Journal of Social Philosophy 42 (2):111-131.
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  27. Christian Barry & Matthew Peterson (2010). Dealing Fairly with the Costs to the Poor of the Global Financial Crisis. In Iain MacNeil & Justin O'Brien (eds.), The Future of Financial Regulation. Hart.
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  28. Christian Barry & Gerhard Øverland (2010). Why Remittances to Poor Countries Should Not Be Taxed. NYU Journal of International Law and Politics 42 (1):1180-1207.
  29. Lucy Allais, David Archard, Neera Badhwar, Christian Barry, Paul Bloomfield, Campbell Brown, Vittorio Bufacchi, Erik Carlson, Paula Casal & Richard Chappell (2009). Referees for Volume 6. Journal of Moral Philosophy 6:549-550.
     
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  30. Christian Barry & Laura Valentini (2009). Egalitarian Challenges to Global Egalitarianism: A Critique. Review of International Studies 35:485-512.
  31. Christian Barry & Gerhard Øverland (2009). Responding to Global Poverty: Review Essay of Peter Singer, the Life You Can Save. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 6 (2):239-247.
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  32. Lea Ypi, Robert E. Goodin & Christian Barry (2009). Associative Duties, Global Justice, and the Colonies. Philosophy and Public Affairs 37 (2):103-135.
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  33. Christian Barry (2008). Christopher F. Zurn,Deliberative Democracy and the Institutions of Judicial Review:Deliberative Democracy and the Institutions of Judicial Review. Ethics 118 (4):767-772.
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  34. Christian Barry & Pablo Gilabert (2008). Does Global Egalitarianism Provide an Impractical and Unattractive Ideal of Justice? International Affairs 84 (5):1025-1039.
    In his important new book National responsibility and global justice, David Miller presents a systematic challenge to existing theories of global justice. In particular, he argues that cosmopolitan egalitarianism must be rejected. Such views, Miller maintains, would place unacceptable burdens on the most productive political communities, undermine national self-determination, and disincentivize political communities from taking responsibility for their fate. They are also impracticable and quite unrealistic, at least under present conditions. Miller offers an alternative account that conceives global justice in (...)
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  35. Christian Barry & Sanjay Reddy (2008). International Trade and Labor Standards:A Proposal for Linkage. Columbia University Press.
    In this book, Christian Barry and Sanjay G. Reddy propose ways in which the international trading system can support poor countries in promoting the well-being of their peoples.
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  36. Christian Barry (2007). Deen K. Chatterjee, Ed., The Ethics of Assistance: Morality and the Distant Needy:The Ethics of Assistance: Morality and the Distant Needy. Ethics 117 (2):338-342.
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  37. Christian Barry & Lydia Tomitova (2007). Fairness in Sovereign Debt. Ethics and International Affairs 21 (s1):41-79.
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  38. Christian Barry (2006). Is Global Institutional Reform a False Promise? Cornell International Law Journal 39 (3):523-536.
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  39. Christian Barry (2005). Applying the Contribution Principle. Metaphilosophy 36 (1-2):210-227.
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  40. Christian Barry & Thomas Winfried Menko Pogge (eds.) (2005). Global Institutions and Responsibilities: Achieving Global Justice. Blackwell.
    This book helps readers identify feasible and morally plausible reforms of global institutional arrangements and international organizations.
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  41. Christian Barry, Michael Davis, Peter K. Dews, Aaron V. Garrett, Yusuf Has, Bill E. Lawson, Val Plumwood, Joshua Preiss, Jennifer C. Rubenstein & Avital Simhony (2003). Book Notes. [REVIEW] Ethics 113 (3):734-741.
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  42. Christian Barry (2002). Boundaries and Allegiances, Samuel Scheffler (New York: Oxford University Press, 2001), 221 Pp., $29.95 Cloth. [REVIEW] Ethics and International Affairs 16 (1):167-172.
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  43. Christian Barry & Kate Raworth (2002). Access to Medicines and the Rhetoric of Responsibility. Ethics and International Affairs 16 (2):57–70.
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  44. Mira Johri & Christian Barry (2002). Health and Global Justice. Ethics and International Affairs 16 (2):33-34.
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  45. Mira Johri & Christian Barry (2002). Introduction. Ethics and International Affairs 16 (2):33–34.
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  46. Christian Barry (2001). The Bounds of Justice, Onora O'Neill (New York: Cambridge University Press, 2000), 226 Pp., $54.95 Cloth, $19.95 Paper. [REVIEW] Ethics and International Affairs 15 (1):197-200.
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