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  1. Christian Diehm (2014). Darwin and Deep Ecology. Ethics and the Environment 19 (1):73-93.
    Upon first encountering the writings of deep ecology theorists, people are sometimes surprised to learn that, despite its moniker, deep ecology is not a branch of the natural sciences. It is, rather, a branch of the environmental movement that was formally introduced to the English-speaking world by Arne Naess in his essay “The Shallow and the Deep, Long-Range Ecology Movement: A Summary” (Naess 1973). Naess’s goal in this article was, as its title indicates, to contrast more conventional, “shallow” approaches to (...)
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  2. Christian Diehm (2012). Biophilia and Biodiversity. Environmental Ethics 34 (1):51-66.
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  3. Christian Diehm (2012). Finding a Niche for Species inNature Ethics. Ethics and the Environment 17 (1):71-86.
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  4. Christian Diehm (2010). Minding Nature. Environmental Ethics 32 (1):3-16.
    It has been claimed that Val Plumwood’s work is vulnerable to the same charge of “assimi­lationism” that she has leveled against moral extensionist viewpoints. It is argued that while one might regard Plumwood’s position as suspect because of its emphasis on human-nature continuity, associating claims of continuity with assimilationism could lead one to seek a mode of relating to nature as absolutely other, a move which is claimed to be problematic for several reasons. Because the extensionist error is not simply (...)
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  5. Christian Diehm (2008). Staying True to Trees. Environmental Philosophy 5 (2):3-16.
    This essay examines how becoming familiar with trees in their specificity might impact how we position ourselves in the ongoing debate among environmental philosophers regarding anthropocentric and non-anthropocentric approaches to environmental ethics. It begins with an analysis of what the process of learning to identify trees entails, and a discussion of how this often involves the development of non-instrumentalist evaluative attitudes towards them, an axiological orientation at odds with the instrumental reductivism characteristic of anthropocentric views. It is then argued that (...)
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  6. Christian Diehm (2007). Identification with Nature: What It is and Why It Matters. Ethics and the Environment 12 (2):1-22.
    : This essay examines the content and significance of the notion of "identification" as it appears in the works of theorists of deep ecology. It starts with the most frequently expressed conception of identification—termed "identification-as-belonging"—and distinguishes several different variants of it. After reviewing two criticisms of deep ecology that appear to target this notion, it is argued that there is a second, less frequently noticed type of identification that appears primarily in the work of Arne Naess—"identification-as-kinship." Following this analysis, it (...)
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  7. Christian Diehm (2006). Arne Naess and the Task of Gestalt Ontology. Environmental Ethics 28 (1):21-35.
    While much of Arne Naess’s ecosophy underscores the importance of understanding one’s ecological Self, his analyses of gestaltism are significant in that they center less on questions of the self than on questions of nature and what is other-than-human. Rather than the realization of a more expansive Self, gestalt ontology calls for a “gestalt shift” in our thinking about nature, one that allows for its intrinsic value to emerge clearly. Taking such a gestalt shift as a central task enables Naess (...)
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  8. Christian Diehm (2006). Ethics and Natural History. Environmental Philosophy 3 (2):34-43.
    This essay questions the place of other-than-human animals in Levinas’s thought. After detailing how animals and animality figure in Levinas’s work, it is claimed that his ethical exclusion of animals is due to a conception of animals as wholly accountable for in terms of species-being, wholly within “naturalhistory.” It is then suggested that Levinas’s position is ill-founded, and at odds with his claims about the importance of suffering and the vulnerable body in the encounter with the other. The essay concludes (...)
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  9. Christian Diehm (2005). Levinas Beyond the Human. In Claire Elise Katz & Lara Trout (eds.), Emmanuel Levinas. Routledge. 4--1.
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  10. Christian Diehm (2004). Deep Ecology and Phenomenology. Environmental Philosophy 1 (2):20-27.
    This essay is written as a companion to the interview “Here I Stand,” and it examines the place of phenomenology in the environmental thought of deep ecologist Arne Naess. Tracing a line through Naess’s somewhat sporadic references to phenomenology, and his comments in the interview, the article argues that Naess’s interest in phenomenology is tied to his attempts to develop an ontology, and tries to show how this project situates Naess in relation to several phenomenologists. The essay concludes with some (...)
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  11. Christian Diehm (2004). “Here I Stand”. Environmental Philosophy 1 (2):6-19.
    The following interview was conducted by Christian Diehm in the home of Arne Naess near Oslo, Norway, in December of 2001. At eighty-nine years of age, Naess was preparing for the English-language release of his latest book, Life’s Philosophy. We are pleased to provide a transcript of a large part of the conversations that spanned two afternoon dialogues.
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  12. Christian Diehm (2003). Gaia and Il y A. Symposium 7 (2):173-183.
  13. Christian Diehm (2002). Arne Naess, Val Plumwood, and Deep Ecological Subjectivity: A Contribution to the "Deep Ecology-Ecofeminism Debate". Ethics and the Environment 7 (1):24-38.
  14. Christian Diehm (2000). Facing Nature. Philosophy Today 44 (1):51-59.
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