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  1. Christian J. Emden (2014). Nietzsche's Naturalism: Philosophy and the Life Sciences in the Nineteenth Century. Cambridge University Press.
    This book explores Nietzsche's philosophical naturalism in its historical context, showing that his position is best understood against the background of encounters between neo-Kantianism and the life sciences in the nineteenth century. Analyzing most of Nietzsche's writings from the late 1860s onwards, Christian J. Emden reconstructs Nietzsche's naturalism and argues for a new understanding of his account of nature and normativity. Emden proposes historical reasons why Nietzsche came to adopt the position he did; his genealogy of values and his account (...)
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  2. Christian J. Emden (2014). Political Realism Naturalized: Nietzsche on the State, Morality, and Human Nature. In Barry Stocker & Manuel Knoll (eds.), Nietzsche as Political Philosopher. De Gruyter 313-344.
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  3. Steven G. Crowell & Christian J. Emden (2012). Georgina Born is Professor of Music and Anthropology at the University of Oxford. Previously, She Was Professor of Sociology, Anthropology, and Music at the University of Cambridge. Honorary Professor of Anthropol-Ogy at University College London and a Fellow of the Center for Cultural Sociology at Yale University, She is the Author of Rationalizing Culture. [REVIEW] In Christian Emden & David R. Midgley (eds.), Beyond Habermas: Democracy, Knowledge, and the Public Sphere. Berghahn Books 218.
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  4. Christian J. Emden (2011). Rhythmus beim frühen Nietzsche (review). Journal of Nietzsche Studies 41 (1):125-126.
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  5. Christian J. Emden (2010). Constitutional Theory, 1928: Carl Schmitt and the Rechtsstaat. Telos: Critical Theory of the Contemporary 2010 (153):179-192.
    ExcerptCarl Schmitt's recently translated Constitutional Theory (Verfassungslehre), first published in 1928 at the end of a period of relative stability in Weimar Germany, is a strangely timely work—both with regard to the continued relevance of the themes and problems it discusses and with regard to the current state of scholarship about Weimar constitutionalism. But, first things first, as befits what was originally intended as a short review article: The translation is accurate, even though it was occasionally necessary to break down (...)
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  6. Christian J. Emden (2008). Carl Schmitt, Hannah Arendt, and the Limits of Liberalism. Telos: Critical Theory of the Contemporary 2008 (142):110-134.
    There can be little doubt that, over the last decade or so, the work of Carl Schmitt has emerged as a central point of reference, in both positive and negative terms, for many debates within contemporary political theory. Despite Schmitt's notoriously controversial and complex position within the intellectual field of modern political thought, a growing interest, for instance, in his critique of parliamentary democracy and his conceptualization of partisan warfare can be felt not only among political movements with revolutionary agendas, (...)
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  7. Christian J. Emden (2006). Nietzsche and Rée: A Star Friendship. Review of Metaphysics 60 (2):424-426.
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  8. Christian J. Emden (2006). Toward a Critical Historicism: History and Politics in Nietzsche's Second “Untimely Meditation”. Modern Intellectual History 3 (1):1-31.
    Focusing on the close connection between Friedrich Nietzsche's historical thought and the discourse of German historicism in the second half of the nineteenth century, this article argues in a thick contextual reading that Nietzsche's second VomNutzenundNachtheilderHistoriefürdasLeben(1874), needs to be understood as a reflection on the political dimension of historical consciousness, outlining what I shall term a In contrast to the standard emphasis on Nietzsche's presumed aestheticism, he is shown to react to rather specific developments within the contemporary intellectual context, such (...)
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