Search results for 'Christianity Influence' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Glenn S. Sunshine (2009). Why You Think the Way You Do: The Story of Western Worldviews From Rome to Home. Zondervan.score: 84.0
    How have we come by our worldviews, and what influence did Christianity have on those that are common to Western civilization?
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  2. John Dillon (1989). Logos and Trinity: Patterns of Platonist Influence on Early Christianity IN The Philosophy in Christianity. In . Cambridge Univ Pr.score: 84.0
    A study of the influence of Platonism on two central areas of Early Christian doctrine, the relation of God the Son to the Father, and the mutual relations of the persons of the Trinity. In the former case, logos-theory and the figure of the demiurge are important; the latter, particularly Porphyry’s theory of the relation between Being, Life and Mind.
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  3. Reasonableness Of Christianity (2010). The Reasonableness of Christianity and its Vindications. In S. J. Savonius-Wroth Paul Schuurman & Jonathen Walmsley (eds.), The Continuum Companion to Locke. Continuum.score: 80.0
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  4. Albert J. Edmunds (1913). Buddhist Influence on Christianity. The Monist 23 (4):600-603.score: 72.0
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  5. Peter Fulljames & Leslie J. Francis (1988). The Influence of Creationism and Scientism on Attitudes Towards Christianity Among Kenyan Secondary School Students. Educational Studies 14 (1):77-96.score: 72.0
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  6. Zhao Fusan (2012). The Position and Influence of Christianity in European Culture: Reality and Mystery. Contemporary Chinese Thought 43 (3):50-60.score: 72.0
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  7. John Dillon (1989). Logos and Trinity: Patterns of Platonist Influence on Early Christianity. Royal Institute of Philosophy Lectures 25:1-13.score: 72.0
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  8. Edgar L. Eckfeldt (2011). The Christian Legacy: Taming Brutish Human Nature in Western Civilization. Life Wisdom Books.score: 72.0
    A people divided -- Impact of science -- The physical world and its life forms -- Human beginnings -- Our animal instincts -- An inward look -- Emergence of civilization -- Flaws in civilizations -- Brutal despair in ancient Rome -- Persistent cruelty -- The search for ethics in antiquity -- Ecclesiastical search for ethics in Christianity -- The Gospel's ethical impact -- Ethical impact in multi-invaded Britannia -- Ethical impact in seeking freedom -- Rather humanitarian Britain -- Rather (...)
     
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  9. Józef Majka (1985). The Influence of Christianity on Ethical Culture of Europe - Perspectives of Personalism. Dialectics and Humanism 12 (1):149-157.score: 72.0
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  10. Anand Amaladass (ed.) (1995). Christian Contribution to Indian Philosophy. Christian Literature Society.score: 66.0
  11. Albert Terrill Rasmussen (1956). Christian Social Ethics. Englewood Cliffs, N.J.,Prentice-Hall.score: 66.0
     
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  12. Joy Kooi-Chin Tong (2012). Overseas Chinese Christian Entrepreneurs in Modern China: A Case Study of the Influence of Christian Ethics on Business Life. Anthem Press.score: 64.0
    Inspired by Max Weber's thesis on the Protestant ethic, this volume sets out to understand the role and influence of Christianity on overseas Chinese entrepreneurs working in China during its transition from a centrally-planned economy ...
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  13. Andrea Werner (2008). The Influence of Christian Identity on SME Owner–Managers' Conceptualisations of Business Practice. Journal of Business Ethics 82 (2):449 - 462.score: 60.0
    This paper reports on the findings of a qualitative study to understand how active adherence to the Christian faith influences the way SME owner-managers conceptualise their business practices. The study was based on in-depth interviews with 21 Christian SME owner-managers in Germany and the UK. Using a socio-psychological approach, the data analysis yielded a range of linguistic and conceptual resources that are peculiar to Christian discourse and that have the potential to influence business activity in rather distinctive ways. This (...)
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  14. M. E. Shirinian (2005). Kʻristoneakan Vardapetutʻyan Antik Ev Hellenistikan Tarrerě: Haykakan Ev Hunakan, Dasakan Ev Byuzandakan Aghbyurneri Baghdatutʻyamb. Mashtotsʻi Anvan Hin Dzeṛagreri Institut "Matenadaran".score: 48.0
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  15. Virgil B. Strohmeyer (1998). The Influence of the Armenian Language and Alphabet Upon the Development of the Renaissance's Perennial Philosophy, Biblical Hermeneutics, and Christian Kabbalism. Publishing House of the Nas Ra "Gitutyun".score: 48.0
     
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  16. John Kilcullen, Christianity and Greek Philosophy.score: 42.0
    Christianity has had, still has, an important influence in politics and in political thought; and in the part of this course from Augustine to Locke we need to talk about it. In this course I do not assume that you all know about Christianity; some of you are Jews or Muslims, or non-religious. So when I talk about it I will try to explain from scratch. I believe I present Christianity sympathetically, but let me say that (...)
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  17. Jonathan Malesic (2007). Illusion and Offense in Philosophical Fragments : Kierkegaard's Inversion of Feuerbach's Critique of Christianity. [REVIEW] International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 62 (1):43 - 55.score: 42.0
    The article shows the "Appendix" to Søren Kierkegaard's "Philosophical Fragments" to be a response to Ludwig Feuerbach's critique of Christianity. While previous studies have detected some influence by Feuerbach on Kierkegaard, they have so far discovered little in the way of specific responses to Feuerbach's ideas in Kierkegaard's published works. The article first makes the historical argument that Kierkegaard was very likely reading Feuerbach's "Essence of Christianity" while he was writing "Philosophical Fragments", as several of Kierkegaard's journal (...)
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  18. Christopher Stead (1994). Philosophy in Christian Antiquity. Cambridge University Press.score: 42.0
    Christianity began as a little-known Jewish sect, but rose within 300 years to dominate the civilised world. It owed its rise in part to inspired moral leadership, but also to its success in assimilating, criticising and developing the philosophies of the day, which offered rationally approved life-styles and moral directives. Without abandoning their allegiance to their founder and to Holy Scripture, Christians could therefore present their faith as a 'new philosophy'. This book, which is written for non-specialist readers, provides (...)
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  19. Bogdan Mihai Radu (2010). Young Believers or Secular Citizens? An Exploratory Study of the Influence of Religion on Political Attitudes and Participation in Romanian High-School Students. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 9 (25):155-179.score: 42.0
    In this paper, I explore the effects of religious denomination and patterns of church-going on the construction of political values for high-school students. I argue that religion plays a role in the formation of political attitudes among teenagers and it influences their political participation. I examine whether this relationship is constructed along denominational lines. From a theoretical perspective, previous research heralded the compatibility between Western Christianity and the democratic form of government. Samuel Huntington, in his famous Clash of Civilization, (...)
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  20. Walter Mead (2010). Murray Jardine on Christianity and Modern Technological Society. Tradition and Discovery 37 (3):39-58.score: 42.0
    Murray Jardine’s The Making and Unmaking of Technological Society further develops several of the author’s political and economic concerns articulated in his earlier Speech and Political Practice. It probes the impact and implications of both Christianity and modern technology for our understanding of, and ability to cope with, problems that have become endemic to Western and, specifically, American culture. Jardine’s major continuing themes include: the importance to a well-formed self and society to be concretely grounded in a sense of (...)
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  21. Corey W. Dyck (2011). A Wolff in Kant's Clothing: Christian Wolff's Influence on Kant's Accounts of Consciousness, Self-Consciousness, and Psychology. Philosophy Compass 6 (1):44-53.score: 40.0
    In attempts to come to grips with Kant’s thought, the influence of the philosophy of Christian Wolff (1679-1754) is often neglected. In this paper, I consider three topics in Kant’s philosophy of mind, broadly construed, where Wolff’s influence is particularly visible: consciousness, self-consciousness, and psychology. I argue that we can better understand Kant’s particular arguments and positions within this context, but also gain a more accurate sense of which aspects of Kant’s accounts derive from the antecedent traditions and (...)
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  22. David E. Smith (2009). Mormons and Evangelicals: Reasons for Faith. Gorgias Press.score: 36.0
    Introduction: Foundations of faith described -- Christian history : a brief overview -- The Apostolic Age (ca. A.D. 30-100 -- The Patristic Age (ca. A.D. 100-500) -- The Medieval Age (ca. A.D. 500-1500) -- The Reformation/counter-Reformation Age -- The Modern Age (ca. A.D. 1600-1950) -- The Postmodern Age (ca. A.D. 1950-present) -- Mormon and evangelical theology : a comparison -- Scripture and revelation -- God and humanity -- Church and temple -- Salvation and the afterlife -- Moral and social standards (...)
     
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  23. P. T. Schotsmans (2009). Christian Bioethics in Europe: In Defense Against Reductionist Influences From the United States. Christian Bioethics 15 (1):17-30.score: 34.0
    Christian ideas have continued to inspire European bioethics until now. The central thesis of this essay is that the open-mindedness of Roman Catholic and other Christian denominations in Europe is crucial for understanding why Christian ethics is so well integrated in the European culture. The essay describes first the institutional frameworks in which these Christian mainly Roman Catholic ideas are developed. It analyzes further the difference between the secular Anglo-American and European bioethics as it has been influenced by these Christian (...)
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  24. Christiane L. Joost-Gaugier (2006). Measuring Heaven: Pythagoras and His Influence on Thought and Art in Antiquity and the Middle Ages. Cornell University Press.score: 32.0
    "In this illustrated book, Christiane L. Joost-Gaugier sets out the panorama of Pythagoras's influence and that of Christian and Jewish thinkers who followed ...
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  25. Nancy Kendrick (2011). The Non-Christian Influence on Anselm's Proslogion Argument. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 69 (2):73-89.score: 32.0
    This paper considers Anselm’s Proslogion argument against a background of historical events that include philosophical disputes between Christian and Jewish polemicists. I argue that the Proslogion argument was addressed, in part, to non-Christian theists and that it offered a response to Jewish polemicists who had argued that the Christian conception of God as an instantiated unity was irrational. Anselm is not trying to convince atheists that there really is a God. He is arguing that the Christian conception of God is (...)
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  26. Roger H. M. Cheng * (2004). Moral Education in Hong Kong: Confucian‐Parental, Christian‐Religious and Liberal‐Civic Influences. Journal of Moral Education 33 (4):533-551.score: 32.0
    A brief review of the social and educational context of Hong Kong shows that the publication of the General guidelines on moral education in schools in 1981, by the Hong Kong Education Department, marked a milestone in the development of moral education. The Guidelines explicitly asserted moral education as one function of schooling, whilst also formally recognizing the home and the community as two main influences. This paper narrates how three moral sources of influence ? namely Confucian?parental, Christian?religious and (...)
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  27. B. A. Lustig (2011). At the Roots of Christian Bioethics: Critical Essays on the Thought of H. Tristram Engelhardt, Jr. Christian Bioethics 17 (3):315-327.score: 32.0
    H. Tristram Engelhardt has made profound contributions to both philosophical and religious bioethics, and his philosophical and religious works may be read in mutually illuminating ways. As a philosopher, Engelhardt has mustered a powerful critique of secular efforts to develop a shared substantive morality. As a religious scholar, Engelhardt has affirmed a Christian bioethics that does not emanate from human rationality but from the experience of God found in Orthodox Christianity. In this collection of essays, both defenders and critics (...)
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  28. Lewis Ayres & Gareth Jones (eds.) (1998). Christian Origins: Theology, Rhetoric, and Community. Routledge.score: 30.0
    This collection is an exploration of the historical course and nature of early Christian theological traditions. The contributors reconsider classic themes and texts in the light of the existing traditions of interpretation. They offer critiques of early Christian ideas and texts and they consider the structure and origins of standard modern readings of these ideas and texts. Christian Origins provides a fresh and often ground-breaking analysis of the origins of Christian thought and offers a comprehensive and synchronic overview of the (...)
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  29. Bryan Rennie (2010). The Influence of Eastern Orthodox Christian Theology on Mircea Eliade's Understanding of Religion. In Christian K. Wedemeyer & Wendy Doniger (eds.), Hermeneutics, Politics, and the History of Religions: The Contested Legacies of Joachim Wach and Mircea Eliade. Oxford University Press.score: 30.0
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  30. Gavin Miller (2009). R. D. Laing and Theology: The Influence of Christian Existentialism on The Divided Self. History of the Human Sciences 22 (2):1-21.score: 26.0
    The radical psychiatrist R. D. Laing's first book, The Divided Self (1960), is informed by the work of Christian thinkers on scriptural interpretation — an intellectual genealogy apparent in Laing's comparison of Karl Jaspers's symptomatology with the theological tradition of `form criticism'. Rudolf Bultmann's theology, which was being enthusiastically promoted in 1950s Scotland, is particularly influential upon Laing. It furnishes him with the notion that schizophrenic speech expresses existential truths as if they were statements about the physical and organic world. (...)
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  31. J. W. Welch (2009). Temple Themes and Ethical Formation in the Sermon On the Mount. Studies in Christian Ethics 22 (2):151-163.score: 26.0
    The Sermon on the Mount is a coherent text, consistently drawing on words, expressions, and sacred values that were principally at home in the Old Testament Psalms and in the spiritual functions of the Temple of Jerusalem. Noticing these powerful allusions and understanding the moral authority that they would have conveyed to the ears of its earliest listeners opens insights into the ability of the Sermon on the Mount to communicate an authoritative moral vision, to engender a shared community ethic, (...)
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  32. John D'Arcy May (2008). Christianity and Human Rights: Influences and Issues (Review). Buddhist-Christian Studies 28 (1):172-175.score: 26.0
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  33. W. Dackson (2004). But Was It Meant to Be a Joke Legacy? Ronald Preston as Heir to William Temple. Studies in Christian Ethics 17 (2):148-161.score: 26.0
    The purpose of this article is to examine and challenge the assumption that the theological legacy of Archbishop William Temple is best continued in the work of Ronald Preston. Preston's concerns in the areas of social ethics and ecumenical relations, as well as his championing of middle axioms, demonstrate his indebtedness to Temple's influence. However, a closer examination of the doctrinal foundations of Preston's social and ecumenical thought did not display a deep understanding of Temple's thought. This is most (...)
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  34. Preston N. Williams (1997). Christian Realism and the Ephesian Suggestion: Influences That Have Shaped My Work. Journal of Religious Ethics 25 (2):233 - 240.score: 26.0
    Formed in the tradition of Augustine and Calvin, the author traces the contributing contemporary influences that have nuanced and expanded his belief in the sovereignty of God, the love of God and neighbor, and the commitment to a just society. Rethinking this religious history in light of American racism, a pragmatic theory of meaning, contemporary social theory, and the contribution of John Rawls, the author endorses a qualified universalism and suggests that race, class, and gender require attention as variables that (...)
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  35. Eleonore Stump (2003). Aquinas. Routledge.score: 24.0
    Few philosophers or theologians exerted as much influence on the shape of Medieval thought as Thomas Aquinas. He ranks amongst the most famous of the Western philosophers and was responsible for almost single-handedly bringing the philosophy of Aristotle into harmony with Christianity. He was also one of the first philosophers to argue that philosophy and theology could support each other. The shape of metaphysics, theology, and Aristotelian thought today still bears the imprint of Aquinas work. In this extensive (...)
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  36. Jarrett Zigon (2009). Developing the Moral Person: The Concepts of Human, Godmanhood, and Feelings in Some Russian Articulations of Morality. Anthropology of Consciousness 20 (1):1-26.score: 24.0
    Based on ethnographic research done in Moscow, Russia, this article describes how some Muscovites articulate their moral consciousness, that is, the ways in which persons articulate to themselves and others how they conceptualize morality. While it may be possible, and indeed is often the case, that these concepts influence how people act and help guide individuals toward moral behavior, what is more important for our purposes is that these concepts provide a way for persons to give meaning, both for (...)
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  37. William O. Stephens, Stoic Ethics. Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 24.0
    The tremendous influence Stoicism has exerted on ethical thought from early Christianity through Immanuel Kant and into the twentieth century is rarely understood and even more rarely appreciated. Throughout history, Stoic ethical doctrines have both provoked harsh criticisms and inspired enthusiastic defenders. The Stoics defined the goal in life as living in agreement with nature. Humans, unlike all other animals, are constituted by nature to develop reason as adults, which transforms their understanding of themselves and their own true (...)
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  38. Michael B. Gill (1999). The Religious Rationalism of Benjamin Whichcote. Journal of the History of Philosophy 37 (2):271-300.score: 24.0
    I. Introduction Most philosophers today have never heard of Benjamin Whichcote (1609-83), and most of the few who have heard of him know only that he was the founder of Cambridge Platonism.1 He is well worth learning more about, however. For Whichcote was a vital influence on both Ralph Cudworth and the Third Earl of Shaftesbury, through whom he helped shape the views of Clarke and Price, on the one hand, and Hutcheson and Hume, on the other. Whichcote should (...)
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  39. Bob Plant (2004). The Wretchedness of Belief: Wittgenstein on Guilt, Religion, and Recompense. Journal of Religious Ethics 32 (3):449 - 476.score: 24.0
    In "Culture and Value" Wittgenstein remarks that the truly "religious man" thinks himself to be, not merely "imperfect" or "ill," but wholly "wretched." While such sentiments are of obvious biographical interest, in this paper I show why they are also worthy of serious philosophical attention. Although the influence of Wittgenstein's thinking on the philosophy of religion is often judged negatively (as, for example, leading to quietist and/or fideist-relativist conclusions) I argue that the distinctly ethical conception of religion (specifically (...)) that Wittgenstein presents should lead us to a quite different assessment. In particular, his preoccupation with the categorical nature of religion suggests a conception of "genuine" religious belief which disrupts both the economics of eschatological-salvationist hope, and the traditional ethical precept that "ought implies can." In short, what Wittgenstein presents is a sketch of a religion without recompense. (shrink)
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  40. John C. Greene (1999). Reflections on Ernst Mayr's This is Biology. Biology and Philosophy 14 (1):103-116.score: 24.0
    In this essay I argue that Ernst Mayr's idea that the emergence of evolutionary biology in Western thought was delayed by the pernicious influence of the false ideologies of Platonism, Christianity, and physicalism is ahistorical and anti-evolutionary, that similar ideas, especially his antipathy to physicalism, prejudice his account of the transformation of natural history and medical science into biology, that his organicist resolution of the perennial conflict between mechanism and vitalism is an unstable compound of semi-holism and semi-mechanism, (...)
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  41. Genia Schönbaumsfeld, 'Objectively There is No Truth' - Wittgenstein and Kierkegaard on Religious Belief.score: 24.0
    Kierkegaard’s influence on Wittgenstein’s conception of religious belief was profound, but this hasn’t so far been given the attention it deserves . Although Wittgenstein wrote comparatively little on the subject, while the whole of Kierkegaard’s oeuvre has a religious theme, both philosophers have become notorious for refusing to construe religious belief in either of the two traditional ways: as a ‘propositional attitude’ on the one hand or as a mere ‘emotional response’ with no reference to the ‘real world’ on (...)
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  42. Willem B. Drees (2010). Robert J. Russell's Eschatological Theology in the Context of Cosmology. Zygon 45 (1):228-236.score: 24.0
    The main title of Robert J. Russell's Cosmology from Alpha to Omega: The Creative Mutual Interaction of Theology and Science catches the substance of the essays; the subtitle his methodological vision. The mutualis modest as far as the influence from theology on science goes; in no way is Russell curtailing the pursuit of science. Driven by intellectual honesty, he holds that in the end religious convictions will have to stand the test of compatibility with scientific knowledge. And as a (...)
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  43. John Kilcullen, Anselm, Monologion.score: 24.0
    One large exception to this generalisation is John Scottus Eriugena, who wrote original philosophical works, and also produced some translations of philosophical works. "Eriugena" is his rendering into Greek of "Scottus", which at that time meant Irish: John the Irishman. He was born in Ireland about AD 810, lived and wrote in France from about 840; he was one of the Irish and English clergy attracted to France by the Carolingian renaissance. He mastered Greek; knowledge of Greek was rare in (...)
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  44. Juan Carlos D'Amico (2012). Gattinara et la « monarchie impériale » de Charles Quint. Entre millénarisme, translatio imperii et droits du Saint-Empire. Astérion. Philosophie, Histoire des Idées, Pensée Politique 10 (10).score: 24.0
    Spreading the universal monarchy myth in the early 16th century was closely linked to the magnitude of the territories controlled by Charles V. For the imperial chancellor Mercurino Gattinara, universal and messianic ideas, which were integrated into the symbolism of the Empire, were to legitimate a policy that aimed at giving a more rational structure to Charles’ territories and at securing a prominent influence for the Habsburg family in the whole of Europe. Gattinara imagined a kind of supranational monarchy, (...)
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  45. Domingos Salgado de Sousa (2011). Modernidade, Cultura e Religião na Ordem Política e Social do Japão (Modernity, Culture and Religion in the Political and Social Order of Japan) - DOI: 10.5752/P.2175-5841.2011v9n23p799. [REVIEW] Horizonte 9 (23):799-820.score: 24.0
    Dificilmente se encontrará um outro país que foi tão influenciado por outras culturas e civilizações como o Japão. De fato, os grandes pontos de viragem da sua história foram marcados pelo encontro com outras civilizações e culturas. Porém, as grandes mudanças que se operaram como resultado de influências exteriores nunca conseguiram pôr em questão as premissas básicas da cultura japonesa. Prevaleceu sempre um sistema de valores que carece de uma clara orientação transcendental e universalista. Enquanto no mundo ocidental a dimensão (...)
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  46. Simon Peret͡sovich Markish (1986). Erasmus and the Jews. University of Chicago Press.score: 24.0
    Erasmus of Rotterdam was the greatest Christian humanist scholar of the Northern European Renaissance, a correspondent of Sir Thomas More and many other learned men of his time, known to his contemporaries and to posterity for subtlety of his thought and the depth of his learning. He was also, according to some modern writers, an anti-Semite. In this complete analysis of all of Erasmus' writings on Jews and Judaism, Shimon Markish asserts that the accusation cannot be sustained. For Markish, to (...)
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  47. Chester Chapin (1987). British References to Shaftesbury 1700-1800. Philosophy Research Archives 13:315-329.score: 24.0
    Adding to A.O. Aldridge’s 1951 list, this list of British eighteenth-century references to Shaftesbury provides further evidence that the philosophy of Shaftesbury and Hutcheson is an important rival to Lockean empiricism during the early and middle decades of the century. The peak of Shaftesbury’s influence occurs during the 1740’s and 1750’s when the deist controversy was at its height. A more conservative political and religious climate of opinion after 1759 is one reason for the decline of Shaftesbury’s reputation as (...)
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  48. W. M. Spellman (1997). John Locke. St. Martin's Press.score: 24.0
    The influence of John Locke's thought in Europe and America rests largely on his articulation and defence of a liberal political philosophy, and in his formulation of a theory of knowledge where experience and environment provide the exclusive starting points in the educational process. Generally he continues to be associated with the eighteenth-century 'Age of Reason' or Enlightenment, where the malleability of human nature, together with the inherent dignity and freedom of the individual, were placed at the forefront of (...)
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  49. Allison Coudert (ed.) (1999). Judaeo-Christian Intellectual Culture in the Seventeenth Century: A Celebration of the Library of Narcissus Marsh (1638-1713). [REVIEW] Kluwer Academic.score: 24.0
    This work focuses on Latin Judaica and Biblical interpretation with a primary emphasis on texts that were found in the library of Archbishop Narcissus Marsh of Dublin. This remarkable collection of Latin Judaica, Polyglot Bibles, and other works sheds light on the way in which the Protestant Reformation dealt both with Jews, and the Bible, the Jewish Kabbalah and religious toleration or intolerance. The articles contained herein will be of especial interest to historians of religion and philosophy, and those (...)
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  50. Oliver Leaman (2006). Jewish Thought: An Introduction. Routledge.score: 24.0
    This is a fresh and contemporary introduction to the Jewish faith, its philosophies and worldviews. Written by a leading figure in the field, it explores debates which have preoccupied Jewish thinkers over the centuries and examines their continuing influence in contemporary Judaism. Jewish Thought surveys the central controversies in Judaism, including the protracted arguments within the religion itself. Topics range from the relations between Judaism and other religions, such as Islam and Christianity, to contemporary issues such as sex (...)
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