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  1. Christina M. Gschwandtner (2014). Degrees of Givenness: On Saturation in Jean-Luc Marion. Indiana University Press.
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  2. Christina M. Gschwandtner (2014). Revealing the Invisible: Henry and Marion on Aesthetic Experience. Journal of Speculative Philosophy 28 (3):305-314.
    The phenomenological thought of French philosophers Michel Henry and Jean-Luc Marion has often attracted attention for the religious connotations or implications of their work. Whether such concern with religious phenomena is welcomed or condemned, it has been the primary if not exclusive focus of study.1 What is less well known is that both thinkers are deeply concerned with aesthetics and have written extensively about art, the artist, and aesthetic theory. Marion’s interest in art goes back to his student days and (...)
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  3. Christina M. Gschwandtner (2013). Corporeality, Animality, Bestiality: Emmanuel Falque on Incarnate Flesh. Analecta Hermeneutica 4.
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  4. Christina M. Gschwandtner (2013). Postmodern Apologetics?: Arguments for God in Contemporary Philosophy. Fordham University Press.
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  5. Christina M. Gschwandtner (2012). Being and God: A Systematic Approach in Confrontation with Martin Heidegger, Emmanuel Levinas, and Jean-Luc Marion, by Lorenz B. Puntel, Translated by Alan White, Northwestern University Press, 2011, 427 Pp., Pb. $39.95, Hb. $89.95 ISBN-13: 9780810127708. [REVIEW] Comparative and Continental Philosophy 4 (1).
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  6. Christina M. Gschwandtner (2012). Marion and Negative Certainty. Philosophy Today 56 (3):363-370.
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  7. Christina M. Gschwandtner (2012). Paul Ricœur and the Relationship Between Philosophy and Religion in Contemporary French Phenomenology. Études Ricoeuriennes / Ricoeur Studies 3 (2):7-25.
    In this paper I consider Ricœur’s negotiation of the boundary or relationship between philosophy and religion in light of the larger debate in contemporary French philosophy. I suggest that contrasting his way of dealing with the intersection of the two discourses to that of two other French thinkers (Jean-Luc Marion and Michel Henry) illuminates his stance more fully. I begin with a brief outline of Ricœur’s claims about the distinction or relation between the discourses, then reflect on those of Marion (...)
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  8. Christina M. Gschwandtner (2012). Testing the Limit: Derrida, Henry, Levinas, and the Phenomenological Tradition—François-David Sebbah. International Philosophical Quarterly 52 (4):495-497.
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  9. Christina M. Gschwandtner (2012). What About Non-Human Life? An "Ecological" Reading of Michel Henry's Critique of Technology. Journal of French and Francophone Philosophy 20 (2):116-138.
    This paper takes its departure from Michel Henry’s criticism of a technological view that “extends its reign to the whole planet, sowing desolation and ruin everywhere” ( I am the Truth , 271). It argues that although Henry’s critique of technology is helpful and important, it does not go far enough, inasmuch as it excludes all non-human beings from the Truth of “Life” he advocates against the destructive truths of technology and therefore cannot fully articulate the way in which technology (...)
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  10. Christina M. Gschwandtner (2011). Interpreting Excess: Jean-Luc Marion, Saturated Phenomena, and Hermeneutics Shane Mackinlay New York: Fordham University Press, 2010; 256 Pp; $50.00 (Hardcover). [REVIEW] Dialogue 50 (02):409-411.
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  11. Christina M. Gschwandtner (2010). Can We Hear the Voice of God? Michel Henry and Words of Christ. In Bruce Ellis Benson & Norman Wirzba (eds.), Words of Life: New Theological Turns in French Phenomenology. Fordham University Press.
  12. Christina M. Gschwandtner (2010). À Dieu or From the Logos? Emmanuel Lévinas and Jean-Luc Marion—Prophets of the Infinite. Philosophy and Theology 22 (1/2):177-203.
    This paper examines the extent to which certain aspects of the philosophies of Emmanuel Lévinas and Jean-Luc Marion are directed toward the divine, especially in regard to how they employ religious imagery or even explicitly biblical metaphors, namely those of the face of the neighbor, the glory of the Infinite, the response of the witness, and the breaking or sharing of bread. This will show important parallels and connections between their respective works, but it will also highlight where they diverge (...)
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  13. Christina M. Gschwandtner (2009). Kevin Hart, Ed. Counter-Experiences: Reading Jean-Luc Marion Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 28 (2):123-125.
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  14. Christina M. Gschwandtner (2007). Reading Jean-Luc Marion: Exceeding Metaphysics. Indiana University Press.
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  15. Christina M. Gschwandtner (2007). The Neighbor and the Infinite: Marion and Levinas on the Encounter Between Self, Human Other, and God. [REVIEW] Continental Philosophy Review 40 (3):231-249.
    In this article I examine Jean-Luc Marion's two-fold criticism of Emmanuel Levinas’ philosophy of other and self, namely that Levinas remains unable to overcome ontological difference in Totality and Infinity and does so successfully only with the notion of the appeal in Otherwise than Being and that his account of alterity is ambiguous in failing to distinguish clearly between human and divine other. I outline Levinas’ response to this criticism and then critically examine Marion's own account of subjectivity that attempts (...)
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  16. Christina M. Gschwandtner (2005). A New 'Apologia': The Relationship Between Theology and Philosophy in the Work of Jean-Luc Marion. Heythrop Journal 46 (3):299–313.
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  17. Christina M. Gschwandtner (2005). Pure and Personal? Jean-Luc Marion's Phenomenologies of Prayer. In Bruce Ellis Benson & Norman Wirzba (eds.), The Phenomenology of Prayer. Fordham University Press.
     
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  18. Christina M. Gschwandtner (2001). Ricoeur's Hermeneutic of God. Philosophy and Theology 13 (2):287-309.
    This paper suggests that Ricoeur’s language about God can be read as a “symbol that gives rise to thought,” or even specifically as a symbol for “hope.” It examines the tensions found in Ricoeur’s hermeneutics in four layers of such symbolic language: First, the language of faith, for Ricoeur, is essentially circular, is poetic language, a language of manifestation and not of adequation. Second, the biblical discourse is composed of several kinds of languages, a polyphony of discourses that provide different (...)
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