18 found
Sort by:
See also:
Profile: Christina Van Dyke (Calvin College)
  1. Christina Van Dyke, I See Dead People: Disembodied Souls and Aquinas’s ‘Two-Person’ Problem.
  2. Christina Van Dyke & Sam Baron (forthcoming). Animal Interrupted, or Why Accepting Pascal’s Wager Might Be the Last Thing You Ever Do. Southern Journal of Philosophy.
    According to conventionalist accounts of personal identity, persons are constituted in part by practices and attitudes of certain sorts of care. In this paper, we concentrate on the most well-developed and defended version of conventionalism currently on offer (namely, that proposed by David Braddon-Mitchell, Caroline West, and Kristie Miller) and discuss how the conventionalist appears forced either 1) to accept arbitrariness concerning from which perspective to judge one’s survival or 2) to maintain egalitarianism at the cost of making ‘transfiguring’ decisions (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Christina Van Dyke (2012). Discipline and the Docile Body: Regulating Hungers in the Capitol. In The Hunger Games and Philosophy. 250-264.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Christina Van Dyke (2012). The End of (Human) Life as We Know It. The Modern Schoolman 89 (3-4):243-257.
    Is the being in an irreversible persistent vegetative state as the result of a horrible accident numerically identical to the human person, Lindsay, who existed before the accident? Many proponents of Thomistic metaphysics have argued that Aquinas’s answer to this question must be “yes.” In particular, it seems that Aquinas’s commitment to both Aristotelian hylomorphism and the unity of substantial form (viz., that each body/soul composite possesses one and only one substantial form) entails the position that the human person remains (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Christina Van Dyke (2012). The Hunger Games and Philosophy.
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Robert Pasnau & Christina Van Dyke (eds.) (2010). The Cambridge History of Medieval Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.
  7. Christina Van Dyke (2010). Mysticism. In The Cambridge History of Medieval Philosophy. 720-734.
  8. Christina Van Dyke (2010). The Truth, the Whole Truth, and Nothing but the Truth: Robert Grosseteste on Universals (and the Posterior Analytics ). Journal of the History of Philosophy 48 (2):pp. 153-170.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Christina Van Dyke (2009). An Aristotelian Theory of Divine Illumination: Robert Grosseteste's Commentary on the Posterior Analytics. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 17 (4):685-704.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Christina Van Dyke (2009). Not Properly a Person. Faith and Philosophy 26 (2):186-204.
    Like Aristotle, Thomas Aquinas holds that the rational soul is the substantial form of the human body. In so doing, he takes himself to be rejecting a Platonic version of substance dualism; his criticisms, however, apply equally to a traditional understanding of Cartesian dualism. Aquinas’s own peculiar brand of dualism is receiving increased attention from contemporary philosophers—especially those attracted to positions that fall between Cartesian substance dualism and reductive materialism. What Aquinas’s own view amounts to, however, is subject to debate. (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Christina Van Dyke (2008). Eating as a Gendered Act: Christianity, Feminism, and Reclaiming the Body. In K. J. Clark (ed.) Readings in the Philosophy of Religion, 2nd Edition (Peterborough: Broadview Press, 2008). 475-489.
  12. Christina Van Dyke (2008). Joseph Pilsner, The Specification of Human Actions in St Thomas Aquinas. (Oxford Theological Monographs.) Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press, 2006. Pp. Xi, 273. [REVIEW] Speculum 83 (1):233-234.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Christina Van Dyke (2008). K. J. Clark (Ed.) Readings in the Philosophy of Religion, 2nd Edition (Peterborough: Broadview Press, 2008).
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Christina Van Dyke (2007). Human Identity, Immanent Causal Relations, and the Principle of Non-Repeatability: Thomas Aquinas on the Bodily Resurrection. Religious Studies 43 (4):373-394.
  15. Christina Van Dyke (2006). Knuuttila, S. -Emotions in Ancient and Medieval Philosophy. Philosophical Books 47 (2):155-157.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Christina Van Dyke (2004). The Cambridge Translations of Medieval Philosophical Texts, Vol. 3. Philosophical Review 113 (4):567-571.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Christina Van Dyke (2002). Review of Thomas Williams (Editor and Translator), Anselm: Three Philosophical Dialogues. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2002 (8).
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Christina Van Dyke (2001). Aquinas's Moral Theory: Essays in Honor of Norman Kretzmann (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 39 (1):143-144.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation