8 found
Sort by:
  1. Christine Chwaszcza (2012). Brill Online Books and Journals. Hobbes Studies 25 (2).
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Christine Chwaszcza (2012). The Practical Conditions of Sovereignty of the People: The Status of Citizens in Multilevel Political Organisations. In Eva Erman & Ludvig Beckman (eds.), Territories of Citizenship. Palgrave Macmillan. 81.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Christine Chwaszcza (2012). The Seat of Sovereignty: Hobbes on the Artificial Person of the Commonwealth or State. Hobbes Studies 25 (2):123-142.
    Is sovereignty in Hobbes the power of a person or of an office? This article defends the thesis that it is the latter. The interpretation is based on an analysis of Hobbes’s version of the social contract in Leviathan . Pace Quentin Skinner, it will be argued that the person whom Hobbes calls “sovereign” is not a person but the office of government.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Christine Chwaszcza (2011). Kollektive Autonomie. Volkssouveränität und individuelle Rechte in der liberalen Demokratie. Deutsche Zeitschrift für Philosophie 59 (6):917-935.
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Christine Chwaszcza (2010). The Concept of Rights in Contemporary Human Rights Discourse. Ratio Juris 23 (3):333-364.
    In a variety of disciplines, there exists a consensus that human rights are individual claim rights that all human beings possess simply as a consequence of being human. That consensus seems to me to obscure the real character of the concept and hinder the progress of discussion. I contend that rather than thinking of human rights in the first instance as “claim rights” possessed by individuals, we should regard human rights as higher order norms that articulate standards of legitimacy for (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Christine Chwaszcza (2008). Beyond Cosmopolitanism: Towards a Non-Ideal Account of Transnational Justice. Ethics and Global Politics 1 (3).
    Cosmopolitanism in normative theory of transnational justice is often characterized by the thesis that the moral and legal status of states must be entirely derived from the moral status of the individuals who constitute them. Although the thesis itself is rather indeterminate in substantive and analytical content, it is generally understood as the claim that states should not be granted the status of moral and legal agents sui generis. This article argues that such a view is analytically and methodologically misleading, (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Christine Chwaszcza (2008). Review of C. A. J. Coady, Morality and Political Violence. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2008 (6).
  8. Christine Chwaszcza (2007). Moral Responsibility and Global Justice: A Human Rights Approach. Nomos.