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  1. Christopher B. Kulp (2011). Moral Facts and the Centrality of Intuitions. In Jill Graper Hernandez (ed.), The New Intuitionism. 48--66.
     
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    Christopher B. Kulp (2014). The Pre-Theoreticality of Moral Intuitions. Synthese 191 (15):3759-3778.
    Moral intuitionism, once an apparently moribund metaethical position, has seen a resurgence of interest of late. Robert Audi, a leading moral intuitionist, has argued that in order for a moral belief to qualify as intuitional, it must fulfill four criteria: it must be non-inferential, firmly held, comprehended, and pre-theoretical. This paper centers on the fourth and seemingly most problematic criterion: pre-theoreticality. The paper begins by stipulating the defensibility of the moral cognitivism upon which moral intuitionism turns. Next, the paper develops (...)
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    Christopher B. Kulp (1994). Rejoinder to Scott L. Pratt. Modern Schoolman 72 (1):77-80.
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    Christopher B. Kulp (2009). Dewey, the Spectator Theory of Knowledge, and Internalism/Externalism. Modern Schoolman 87 (1):67-77.
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    Christopher B. Kulp (1991). Dewey's Metaphysics. By Raymond D. Boisvert. Modern Schoolman 68 (3):271-273.
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    Christopher B. Kulp (1990). Dewey, Indeterminacy, and the Spectator Theory of Knowledge. Modern Schoolman 67 (3):207-221.
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    Christopher B. Kulp (2002). Brandom, Robert B. Articulating Reasons: An Introduction to Inferentialism. Review of Metaphysics 55 (4):847-848.
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    Christopher B. Kulp (1994). Hintikka, Deductive Chains, and the Consequences of Knowing. Philosophia 23 (1-4):45-58.
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  9. Christopher B. Kulp (1986). John Dewey and the Spectator Theory of Knowledge. Dissertation, Vanderbilt University
    John Dewey's philosophical work has enjoyed a resurgence of interest of late, largely because of its iconoclastic stance toward traditional philosophy in general, and traditional epistemology in particular. In this dissertation I examine critically the anti-epistemological project which occupied Dewey throughout the first half of this century. In common with many other commentators, I understand Dewey to have held that the central, fatal flaw of traditional epistemology is its commitment to what he called the Spectator Theory of Knowledge --roughly the (...)
     
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  10. Christopher B. Kulp (1991). John Dewey, "The Later Works, Vols. 15 and 16". [REVIEW] Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 27 (2):250.
     
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  11. Christopher B. Kulp (ed.) (1997). Realism/Antirealism and Epistemology. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    This landmark collection of essays by six renowned philosophers explores the implications of the contentious realism/antirealism debate for epistemology. The essays examine issues such as whether epistemology needs to be realist, the bearing of a realist conception of truth on epistemology, and realism and antirealism in terms of a pragmatist conception of epistemic justification. Richard Rorty's essay provides a critical commentary on the other five.
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  12. Christopher B. Kulp (1992). The End of Epistemology: Dewey and His Current Allies on the Spectator Theory of Knowledge. Greenwood Press.