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  1. Christopher Belshaw (forthcoming). Better Never to Have Been: The Harm of Coming Into Existence. Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews.
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  2. Christopher Belshaw (2014). Assisted Death: A Study in Ethics and Law. Philosophical Quarterly 64 (254):157-158.
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  3. Christopher Belshaw (2013). David Archard and David Benatar (Eds.), Procreation and Parenthood: The Ethics of Bearing and Rearing Children. Journal of Moral Philosophy 10 (1):101-104.
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  4. Christopher Belshaw (2013). Death, Posthumous Harm, and Bioethics. By James Stacey Taylor. (London: Routledge, 2012. Pp. 228. Price £80.00 Hb. Also Available as an eBook.). [REVIEW] Philosophical Quarterly 63 (252):621-624.
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  5. Christopher Belshaw, Death, Value and Desire.
    This chapter examines the connection between value and desire with regard to death. It argues that having categorical desires is a necessary condition for death to be bad for those who die, and that the degree to which death is bad bears a close relation to the number and strength of those desires. The chapter also analyzes the principles espoused by Jeff McMahan in his book “The Ethics of Killing: Problems at the Margins of Life.”.
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  6. Christopher Belshaw (2012). A New Argument for Anti-Natalism. South African Journal of Philosophy 31 (1):117-127.
    Consider the view that coming into existence is bad for us. Can we hold this and yet deny that ceasing to exist would be good for us? I argue that we can. First, many animals have lives such that they would be better off not existing. Second, if persons and babies are distinct things then the same is true of babies. Third, even if persons and babies are not distinct things – rather they are phases that human beings go through (...)
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  7. Christopher Belshaw (2012). What's Wrong with the Experience Machine? European Journal of Philosophy 21 (2):n/a-n/a.
    Nozick's thought experiment is less effective than is often believed. Certainly, there could be reasons to enter the machine. Possibly, life there might be among the best of all those available. Yet we need to distinguish between two versions. On the first, I retain my beliefs, memories, dispositions, some knowledge. On the second, all these too are determined by the scientists. Nozick alludes to both versions. But only on the first will machine life have appeal.
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  8. Christopher Belshaw (2011). Death – Todd May. Philosophical Quarterly 61 (242):220-222.
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  9. Christopher Belshaw (2010). Animals, Identity and Persistence. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 89 (3):401 - 419.
    A number of claims are closely connected with, though logically distinct from, animalism. One is that organisms cease to exist when they die. Two others concern the relation of the brain, or the brainstem, to animal life. One of these holds that the brainstem is necessary for life?more precisely, that (say) my cat's brainstem is necessary for my cat's life to continue. The other is that it is sufficient for life?more precisely, that so long as (say) my cat's brainstem continues (...)
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  10. Christopher Belshaw (2010). Privacy, Confidentiality and Harm. Nursing Ethics 17 (1):133-134.
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  11. Peter Baofu, Christopher Belshaw & U. K. Chesham (2009). Appearance in This List Neither Guarantees nor Precludes a Future Review of the Book. Mind 118:469.
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  12. Christopher Belshaw (2009). The Teacher's Perspective. In John Strain, Ronald Barnett & Peter Jarvis (eds.), Universities, Ethics, and Professions: Debate and Scrutiny. Routledge. 113.
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  13. Christopher Belshaw & Gary Kemp (2009). Introduction. In Christopher Belshaw & Gary Kemp (eds.), 12 Modern Philosophers. Wiley-Blackwell.
     
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  14. Christopher Belshaw & Gary Kemp (eds.) (2009). 12 Modern Philosophers. Wiley-Blackwell.
     
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  15. Christopher Belshaw & Gary Kemp (eds.) (2009). Twelve Modern Philosophers. Wiley--Blackwell.
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  16. Christopher Belshaw (2008). Persons, Humanity, and the Definition of Death – John Lizza. Philosophical Quarterly 58 (230):188–190.
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  17. Christopher Belshaw (2007). Mortal Beings: On the Metaphysics and Value of Death – Jens Johansson. Philosophical Quarterly 57 (228):506–508.
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  18. Christopher Belshaw (2007). Review of David Benatar, Better Never to Have Been: The Harm of Coming Into Existence. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2007 (6).
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  19. Christopher Belshaw (2006). My Beginnings. The Monist 89 (3):371-389.
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  20. Christopher Belshaw (2005). 10 Good Questions About Life and Death. Blackwell Pub..
    Where can I find answers? -- Is life sacred? -- Is it bad to die? -- Which deaths are worse? -- Might I live on? -- Should I take the elixir of life? -- Who's who? -- Is it all meaningless? -- Should there be more, and better, people? -- Does reality matter?
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  21. Christopher Belshaw (2004). In Defense of Environmental Philosophy. Environmental Ethics 26 (3):335-336.
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  22. Christopher Belshaw (2003). More Lives, Better Lives. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 6 (2):127-141.
    Although many people believe that more people would be better, arguments intended to show this are unconvincing. I consider one of Parfit's arguments for a related conclusion, that even when both are worth living, we ought to prefer the better of two lives. Were this argument successful, or so I claim, then it would follow that more people would be better. But there aren't reasons for preferring the better of two lives. Nor is an attempted rejoinder effective. We can agree (...)
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  23. Christopher Belshaw, Death, Brains, and Persons.
    This book explores many of the issues that arise when we consider persons who are in pain, who are suffering, and who are nearing the end of life. Suffering provokes us into a journey toward discovering who we are and forces us to rethink many of the views we hold about ourselves.
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  24. Christopher Belshaw (2001). Environmental Philosophy: Reason, Nature, and Human Concern. Acumen.
    As anxiety about environmental change and its effects grows, we need to understand both the scientific processes and the ethical and aesthetic judgments involved in deciding which changes we should welcome and promote and which we should try to avoid. In Environmental Philosophy Christopher Belshaw examines the current debates on the environment, focusing on questions of value while also taking into account relevant issues in epistemology and metaphysics. Beginning with an overview of current concerns, Belshaw locates our attitudes toward the (...)
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  25. Christopher Belshaw (2000). Death, Pain and Time. Philosophical Studies 97 (3):317-341.
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  26. Christopher Belshaw (2000). Identity and Disability. Journal of Applied Philosophy 17 (3):263–276.
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  27. Christopher Belshaw (2000). Later Death/Earlier Birth. Midwest Studies in Philosophy 24 (1):69–83.
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  28. Christopher Belshaw (1998). Gold. Theoria 13 (3):415-426.
    Kripke’s opponents claim that gold, in all possible worlds, is a yellow metal. They believe that the atomic number can vary from world to world. Kripke inverts this, holding that while gold is, in all possible worlds, the element with atomic number 79, its surface properties may vary widely from world to world. Both views are flawed, but of the two, the rival is to be preferred. There is a better view. Gold is, in all possible worlds, the element with (...)
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  29. Christopher Belshaw (1997). Abortion, Value and the Sanctity of Life. Bioethics 11 (2):130–150.
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  30. Christopher Belshaw (1996). Oliver Johnson, The Mind of David Hume: A Companion to Book I of A Treatise of Human Nature Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 16 (5):353-354.
  31. Christopher Belshaw (1993). Asymmetry and Non-Existence. Philosophical Studies 70 (1):103 - 116.
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  32. Christopher Belshaw (1989). Hume and Demonstrative Knowledge. Hume Studies 15 (1):141-162.
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  33. Christopher Belshaw (1989). Scepticism and Madness. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 67 (4):447 – 451.
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