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  1. Christopher Bennett (forthcoming). Penal Disenfranchisement. Criminal Law and Philosophy:1-15.
    This paper considers the justifiability of removing the right to vote from those convicted of crimes. Firstly, I consider the claim that the removal of the right to vote from prisoners (or serious offenders) is necessary as a practical matter to protect the democratic process from those who have shown themselves to be untrustworthy. Secondly, I look at the claim that offenders have broken the social contract and forfeited rights to participate in making law. And thirdly, I look at the (...)
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  2. Christopher Bennett (2013). Considering Capital Punishment as a Human Interaction. Criminal Law and Philosophy 7 (2):367-382.
    This paper contributes to the normative debate over capital punishment by looking at whether the role of executioner is one in which it is possible and proper to take pride. The answer to the latter question turns on the kind of justification the agent can give for what she does in carrying out the role. So our inquiry concerns whether the justifications available to an executioner could provide him with the kind of justification necessary for him to take pride in (...)
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  3. Christopher Bennett (2013). Morality, Self-Knowledge and Human Suffering: An Essay on the Loss of Confidence in the World, by Josep E. Corbí. New York: Routledge, 2012, 254 Pp. ISBN 978-0-415-89069-4 Hb $85.00. [REVIEW] European Journal of Philosophy 21:e14-e18.
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  4. Christopher Bennett (2012). Excuses, Justifications and the Normativity of Expressive Behaviour. Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 32 (3):563-581.
    In this article, I look at the role of appeals to the emotions in criminal law defences. A position commonly held is that appeals to the emotions can excuse but cannot justify. However, we should be careful that this view does not rest on too simple and non-cognitive a view of the emotions. I contrast a simple picture, according to which action from emotion involves loss of rational control, with the more Aristotelian picture recently offered by RA Duff. I then (...)
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  5. Christopher Bennett (2012). Précis of" The Apology Ritual". Teorema: Revista Internacional de Filosofía 31 (2):73-94.
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  6. Christopher Bennett (2012). Replies to My Commentators. Teorema: Revista Internacional de Filosofía 31 (2):153-169.
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  7. Christopher Bennett (2012). Vera Bergelson: Victims' Rights and Victims' Wrongs. [REVIEW] Criminal Law and Philosophy 6 (1):103-109.
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  8. Christopher Bennett, Edgar Maraguat, J. M. Pérez Bermejo, Antony Duff, J. L. Martí, Sergi Rosell & Constantine Sandis (2012). Symposium. The Apology Ritual. Teorema 31 (2).
    Symposium on Christopher Bennet's The Apology Ritual. A Philosophical Theory of Punishment [Cambridge University Press, 2008].
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  9. Peter Asp, Christopher Bennett, Peter Cave, J. Angelo Corlett, Richard Dagger, Michael Davis, Anthony Ellis, Thomas S. Petersen, Julian V. Roberts & Torbjörn Tännsjö (2011). Recidivist Punishments: The Philosopher's View. Lexington Books.
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  10. Christopher Bennett (2011). Actions, Institutions, and the Common Good. Criminal Justice Ethics 30 (2):205-212.
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  11. Christopher Bennett (2011). Making Amends: Atonement in Law, Morality and Politics. Journal of Moral Philosophy 8 (1):165-167.
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  12. Christopher Bennett (2010). Blame, Remorse, Mercy, Forgiveness. In John Skorupski (ed.), The Routledge Companion to Ethics. Routledge.
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  13. Christopher Bennett (2010). What is This Thing Called Ethics? Routledge.
    Death and the meaning of life -- Which lives count? -- How much can morality require us to do for one another? -- Utilitarianism -- Kantian ethics -- Aristotelian virtue ethics -- Ethics and religion -- Morality as contract -- Critiques of morality.
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  14. Christopher Bennett (2009). L. Zaibert, Punishment and Retribution. Criminal Law and Philosophy 4 (1):105-107.
  15. C. Fred Alford, Michael J. Almeida, Chrisoula Andreou, Maria Antonaccio, Christopher Bennett, Ben Bradley, Elizabeth Brake, Sarah Broadie, Baruch Brody & Nicholas Buccola (2008). Referees for Volume 5. Journal of Moral Philosophy 5:465-466.
     
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  16. Christopher Bennett (2008). A Theory of Political Obligation - by Margaret Gilbert. Philosophical Books 49 (4):390-392.
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  17. Christopher Bennett (2008). The Apology Ritual: A Philosophical Theory of Punishment. Cambridge University Press.
    Christopher Bennett presents a theory of punishment grounded in the practice of apology, and in particular in reactions such as feeling sorry and making amends. He argues that offenders have a 'right to be punished' - that it is part of taking an offender seriously as a member of a normatively demanding relationship (such as friendship or collegiality or citizenship) that she is subject to retributive attitudes when she violates the demands of that relationship. However, while he claims that punishment (...)
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  18. Christopher Bennett (2007). Apology and Reparation in a Multicultural State. In Michael D. A. Freeman & Ross Harrison (eds.), Law and Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
     
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  19. Christopher Bennett (2007). Satisfying the Needs and Interests of Victims. In Gerry Johnstone & Daniel W. van Ness (eds.), Handbook of Restorative Justice. 247--264.
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  20. Christopher Bennett (2006). Autonomy and Conjugal Love: A Reply to Golash. Res Publica 12 (2):191-201.
    In my response to Golash I distinguish between two steps in my original argument. The first relates to the special value of conjugal (two-person) love relationships. I defend this step against criticisms, arguing that the two-person relationship provides a form of recognition that is of special importance to us and cannot be found in other sorts of relationship. The two-person relationship is one that, at least as private individuals, we have special reason to pursue. The second step concerns the claim (...)
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  21. Christopher Bennett (2006). State Denunciation of Crime. Journal of Moral Philosophy 3 (3):288-304.
    In this paper I am concerned with a problem for communicative theories of punishment. On such theories, punishment is justified at least in part as the authoritative censure or condemnation of crime. But is this compatible with a broadly liberal political outlook? For while liberalism is generally thought to take only a very limited interest in its citizens’ attitudes (seeing moral opinion as a matter of legitimate debate), the idea of state denunciation of crime seems precisely to be focused on (...)
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  22. Christopher Bennett (2006). Taking the Sincerity Out of Saying Sorry: Restorative Justice as Ritual. Journal of Applied Philosophy 23 (2):127–143.
  23. Christopher Bennett, Michael Bennett & Stephen Bennett (2005). Communities at Work? The Concept of 'Community' in Organisational Analysis. Philosophy of Management 5 (3):31-41.
    In this paper we assess the adequacy of the idea of community as an ideal-typical model against which real organisations and their management might be critically evaluated. Alasdair MacIntyre’s work on practices suggests that some forms of work activity require something more than contractual relationships withinorganisations: if he is right then perhaps we should acknowledge the importance of some notion of community at work. However, among the criticisms of the community approach are that it ignores issues of power and the (...)
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  24. Christopher Bennett (2004). Review Article: Forgiveness and the Claims of Retribution. Journal of Moral Philosophy 1 (1):89-101.
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  25. Christopher Bennett (2004). The Limits of Mercy. Ratio 17 (1):1–11.
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  26. Christopher Bennett (2004). Punishment. Philosophical Books 45 (4):324-334.
    How can a state be morally justified in punishing some of its citizens? In tackling this I shall set aside three important matters: we do not morally approve of all the laws of the land, so that sometimes there is a legal but not a moral case against an offender; we can do more things about crime than just punish the criminals, for example remedying the familial and social conditions that encourage it; and, thirdly, many actual penal institutions do things (...)
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  27. Christopher Bennett (2003). Is Amnesty a Collective Act of Forgiveness? Contemporary Political Theory 2 (1):67.
  28. Christopher Bennett (2003). Liberalism, Autonomy and Conjugal Love. Res Publica 9 (3):285-301.
    This paper argues that a liberal state is justified in promoting relationships of conjugal love – the form of relationship that is the basis of the institution of marriage – on the grounds that they are essential to the development and maintenance of autonomy. A deep human need is that the detail of our lives be recognized (accepted, affirmed, granted importance) by others (or by an other). Autonomy can be compromised when this need is not met. So a state concerned (...)
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  29. Christopher Bennett (2003). Personal and Redemptive Forgiveness. European Journal of Philosophy 11 (2):127–144.
    Some philosophers think that forgiveness should only be granted in response to the wrongdoer’s repentance, while others think that forgiveness can properly be given unconditionally. In this paper I show that both of these positions are partially correct. In redemptive forgiveness we wipe the wrong from the offender’s moral record. It is wrong to forgive redemptively in the absence of some atonement. Personal forgiveness, on the other hand, is granted when the victim overcomes inappropriate though humanly understandable feelings of hate (...)
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  30. Christopher Bennett (2003). The Killing State: Capital Punishment in Law, Politics and Culture. Contemporary Political Theory 2 (2):255.
  31. Christopher Bennett (2003). A Problem Case for Public Reason. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 6 (3):50-69.
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  32. Christopher Bennett (2002). The Varieties of Retributive Experience. Philosophical Quarterly 52 (207):145-163.
    Retribution is often dismissed as augmenting the initial harm done, rather than ameliorating it. This criticism rests on a crude view of retribution. In our actual practice in informal situations and in the workings of the reactive (properly called 'retributive') sentiments, retribution is true to the gravity of wrongdoing, but does aim to ameliorate it. Through wrongdoing, offenders become alienated from the moral community: their actions place their commitment to its core values in doubt. We recognize this status in blaming, (...)
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  33. Christopher Bennett (2001). Punishment, Moral Community and Moral Argument: A Review of R.A. Duff,Punishment, Communication and Communityand Matt Matravers,Justice and Punishment: The Rationale of Coercion. [REVIEW] Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 4 (3):101-119.