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  1. Christopher Cherniak, Huysmans' Tortoise.
    How things were a decade ago: The largest rain forest of our planet abides in the Amazon Basin, a tenth of the entire world biomass. It is one of the last great frontiers on earth; only the bottom of the sea presents terra incognita on so rich and grand a scale. Perhaps half the planet's species dwell in Amazonia, most of them still unknown to our own technological encampment. No mere ocean of green, this community is so intricately interwoven as (...)
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  2. Christopher Cherniak, Large-Scale Optimization of Neuron Arbors.
    At the global as well as local scales, some of the geometry of types of neuron arbors—both dendrites and axons—appears to be self-organizing: Their morphogenesis behaves like flowing water, that is, fluid dynamically; waterflow in branching networks in turn acts like a tree composed of cords under tension, that is, vector mechanically. Branch diameters and angles and junction sites conform significantly to this model. The result is that such neuron tree samples globally minimize their total volume—rather than, for example, surface (...)
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  3. Christopher Cherniak, Optimal-Wiring Models of Neuroanatomy.
    Combinatorial network optimization appears to fit well as a model of brain structure: connections in the brain are a critically constrained resource, hence their deployment in a wide range of cases is finely optimized to “‘save wire". This review focuses on minimization of large-scale costs, such as total volume for mammal dendrite and axon arbors and total wirelength for positioning of connected neural components such as roundworm ganglia (and also mammal cortex areas). Phenomena of good optimization raise questions about mechanisms (...)
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  4. Christopher Cherniak (2005). Innateness and Brain-Wiring Optimization. In António Zilhão (ed.), Evolution, Rationality, and Cognition: A Cognitive Science for the Twenty-First Century. Routledge.
     
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  5. Christopher Cherniak (1995). Neural Component Placement. Trends in Neurosciences 18 (12):522-527.
  6. Christopher Cherniak (1994). Philosophy and Computational Neuroanatomy. Philosophical Studies 73 (2-3):89-107.
  7. Christopher Cherniak (1991). Meta-Neuroanatomy: The Myth of the Unbounded Mind/Brain. In Evandro Agazzi & Alberto Cordero (eds.), Philosophy and the Origin and Evolution of the Universe. Norwell: Kluwer. 219--252.
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  8. Christopher Cherniak (1990). The Bounded Brain: Toward Quantitative Neuroanatomy. Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience 2 (1).
  9. Christopher Cherniak (1988). Undebuggability and Cognitive Science. Communications of the Acm 31 (4):402-416.
  10. Christopher Cherniak (1986). Limits for Knowledge. Philosophical Studies 49 (1):1 - 18.
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  11. Christopher Cherniak (1986). Minimal Rationality. MIT Press.
    In Minimal Rationality, Christopher Cherniak boldly challenges the myth of Man the the Rational Animal and the central role that the "perfectly rational...
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  12. Christopher Cherniak (1984). Computational Complexity and the Universal Acceptance of Logic. Journal of Philosophy 81 (12):739-758.
  13. Christopher Cherniak (1983). Rationality and the Structure of Memory. Synthese 57 (November):163-86.
    A tacit and highly idealized model of the agent's memory is presupposed in philosophy. The main features of a more psychologically realistic duplex (orn-plex) model are sketched here. It is argued that an adequate understanding of the rationality of an agent's actions is not possible without a satisfactory theory of the agent's memory and of the trade-offs involved in management of the memory, particularly involving compartmentalization of the belief set. The discussion identifies some basic constraints on the organization of knowledge (...)
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  14. Christopher Cherniak (1983). The Epistemological Status of Lay Intuition. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 6 (3):489.
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  15. Christopher Cherniak (1981). Feasible Inferences. Philosophy of Science 48 (2):248-268.
    A philosophically important but largely overlooked cognitive theory is examined, one that provides information on which inferences an agent will make from his beliefs. Such a theory of feasible inferences is indispensable in a complete cognitive psychology, in particular, for predicting the agent's actions on the basis of rationality conditions and attributed beliefs and desires. However, very little of the feasibility theory which applies to a typical human being can be shown a priori to apply to all agents. The logical (...)
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