Search results for 'Christopher Clive Langton Gregory' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Christopher Clive Langton Gregory (1954). Physical and Physical Research. Reigate, Surrey, Omega Press.score: 502.5
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  2. Richard Gregory (forthcoming). An Interview with Richard Gregory. Cogito.score: 120.0
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  3. Walter K. Dodds, Christopher T. Robinson, Evelyn E. Gaiser, Gretchen Ja Hansen, Heather Powell, Joseph M. Smith, Nathaniel B. Morse, Sherri L. Johnson, Stanley V. Gregory & Tisza Bell (2012). Surprises and Insights From Long-Term Aquatic Data Sets and Experiments. Bioscience 62 (8):709-721.score: 120.0
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  4. Alys L. Gregory (1930). The Cambridge Manuscript of the Questiones of Stephen Langton. New Scholasticism 4 (2):165-226.score: 120.0
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  5. Baruch Spinoza, S. Shirley & Brad Gregory (1989). Tractatus Theologico-Politicus: Gebhardt Edition (1925). Translated by S. Shirley. Introduction by B.S. Gregory. Brill.score: 120.0
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  6. David Meconi (2011). Gregory of Nyssa and the Grasp of Faith: Union, Knowledge, and Divine Presence. By Martin Laird and Gregory of Nazianzus on the Trinity and Knowledge of God: In Your Light We Shall See Light. By Christopher A. Beeley. [REVIEW] Heythrop Journal 52 (5):824-825.score: 36.0
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  7. Colin M. Macleod (2000). Jules L. Coleman and Christopher Morris, Rational Commitment and Social Justice: Essays for Gregory Kavka:Rational Commitment and Social Justice: Essays for Gregory Kavka. Ethics 110 (3):605-607.score: 36.0
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  8. Brian Bix (1999). Jules L. Coleman and Christopher W. Morris, Eds., Rational Commitment and Social Justice: Essays for Gregory Kavka Reviewed By. [REVIEW] Philosophy in Review 19 (5):318-320.score: 36.0
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  9. D. Ganea (1996). Immune Apoptosis Apoptosis and the Immune Response Christopher D. Gregory. Bioscience 46 (9):705-705.score: 36.0
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  10. Patrick J. Geary (2004). Martin Heinzelmann, Gregory of Tours: History and Society in the Sixth Century. Trans. Christopher Carroll. Cambridge, Eng.: Cambridge University Press, 2001. Pp. Xii, 235; Black-and-White Figures. $59.95. First Published in 1994 Under the Title Gregor von Tours (538–594), “Zehn Bücher Geschichte”: Historiographie Und Gesellschaftskonzept Im 6. Jahrhundert, by Wissenschaftliche Buchgesellschaft, Darmstadt, and Reviewed in Speculum 71 (1996), 959–61, by Richard A. Gerberding. [REVIEW] Speculum 79 (1):197-199.score: 36.0
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  11. Jules L. Coleman, Christopher W. Morris & Gregory S. Kavka (eds.) (1998). Rational Commitment and Social Justice: Essays for Gregory Kavka. Cambridge University Press.score: 22.5
    Greg Kavka (1947-1994) was a prominent and influential figure in contemporary moral and political philosophy. The new essays in this volume are concerned with fundamental issues of rational commitment and social justice to which Kavka devoted his work as a philosopher. The essays take Kavka's work as a point of departure and seek to advance the respective debates. The topics include: the relationship between intention and moral action as part of which Kavka's famous 'toxin puzzle' is a focus of discussion, (...)
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  12. Jeffery D. Smith (2007). Managerial Authority as Political Authority: A Retrospective Examination of Christopher McMahon's Authority and Democracy. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 71 (4):335 - 338.score: 18.0
    An introduction to the March, 2005 symposium “The Political Theory of Organizations: A Retrospective Examination of Christopher McMahon’s Authority and Democracy” held in San Francisco as part of the Society for Business Ethics Group Meeting at the Pacific Division Meetings of the American Philosophical Association.
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  13. Gerard Goggin (2008). Bioethics, Disability, and the Good Life: Remembering Christopher Newell, 1964–2008. [REVIEW] Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 5 (4):235-238.score: 18.0
    The untimely passing of Reverend Canon Dr Christopher Newell, AM, came as a shock to many in the bioethics world. As well as an obituary, this article notes a number of important themes in his work, and provides a select bibliography. Christopher's major contribution to this field is that he was one of a handful of scholars who made disability not only an acceptable area of bioethics—indeed a vital, central, fertile area of enquiry. Crucially Christopher emphasised (...)
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  14. Manuel Sumares (2011). Post-Secularity, Orthodoxy, and the "Theosis" Factor: Blondel and St. Gregory Palamas. Revista Portuguesa de Filosofia 67 (1):81 - 102.score: 18.0
    The expression "post-secular" has emerged in the context of contemporary culture. But it is especially due to the Radical Orthodoxy movement, especially its extension of the thematic concerns advanced by La nouvelle théologie about how to best conceive the supernatural in our times, that two important possibilities have come to the fore: firstly, the rethinking of the relationship between philosophy and theology; secondly, the reconsidering of Christian orthodoxy's potential to resituate the human experience in regard to orthodoxy's most daring proposal: (...)
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  15. Giovanni Maio (1999). Is Etiquette Relevant to Medical Ethics? Ethics and Aesthetics in the Works of John Gregory (1724–1773). Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 2 (2):181-187.score: 18.0
    The writings of the Scottish physician and philosopher John Gregory play an important role in the modern codification of medical ethics. It is therefore appropriate to use his work as a historical example in approaching the question how elements of aesthetics were incorporated in 18th century medical ethics. The concept of a Gentleman is pivotal to the entire medical ethics of John Gregory as it provides him with the ethical source of the duty to patients. Gregory makes (...)
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  16. Kenneth Kunen & Dilip Raghavan (2009). Gregory Trees, the Continuum, and Martin's Axiom. Journal of Symbolic Logic 74 (2):712-720.score: 18.0
    We continue the investigation of Gregory trees and the Cantor Tree Property carried out by Hart and Kunen. We produce models of MA with the Continuum arbitrarily large in which there are Gregory trees, and in which there are no Gregory trees.
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  17. Allister Neher (2009). Christopher Wren, Thomas Willis and the Depiction of the Brain and Nerves. Journal of Medical Humanities 30 (3):191-200.score: 18.0
    This paper is about Christopher Wren’s engravings for Thomas Willis’ The Anatomy of the Brain and Nerves of 1664. It is a study in the intersection of medicine and art in 17th century Britain. Willis, an eminent English physician and anatomist, was a major figure in the development of modern neurology, and The Anatomy of the Brain and Nerves was his most famous and influential book. Wren was Willis’ assistant and medical artist. I discuss the visual strategies employed by (...)
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  18. Christopher Norris & Marianna Papastephanou (2002). Deconstruction, Anti–Realism and Philosophy of Science—an Interview with Christopher Norris. Journal of Philosophy of Education 36 (2):265–289.score: 15.0
    In this interview, Christopher Norris discusses a wide range of issues having to do with postmodernism, deconstruction and other controversial topics of debate within present-day philosophy and critical theory. More specifically he challenges the view of deconstruction as just another offshoot of the broader postmodernist trend in cultural studies and the social sciences. Norris puts the case for deconstruction as continuing the 'unfinished project of modernity' and—in particular—for Derrida's work as sustaining the values of enlightened critical reason in various (...)
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  19. Anne A. Davenport (2007). Scotus as the Father of Modernity. The Natural Philosophy of the English Franciscan Christopher Davenport in 1652. Early Science and Medicine 12 (1):55-90.score: 15.0
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  20. Donald L. Ross, Gregory of Nyssa. Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 15.0
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  21. Claudia Baracchi (2013). The Syntax of Life: Gregory Bateson and the “Platonic View”. Research in Phenomenology 43 (2):204-219.score: 15.0
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  22. Andrey Darovskikh (2012). Book Review: Morwenna Ludlow. Gregory of Nyssa: Ancient and (Post) Modern. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2007. [REVIEW] Forum Philosophicum 17 (2):278-281.score: 15.0
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  23. Mario Markus, Malte Schmick & Eric Goles (2006). Tracks Emerging by Forcing Langton's Ant with Binary Sequences. Complexity 11 (3):27-32.score: 15.0
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  24. Brian L. Keeley (1998). Artificial Life for Philosophers. Philosophical Psychology 11 (2):251 – 260.score: 13.5
    Artificial life (ALife) is the attempt to create artificial instances of life in a variety of media, but primarily within the digital computer. As such, the field brings together computationally-minded biologists and biologically-minded computer scientists. I argue that this new field is filled with interesting philosophical issues. However, there is a dearth of philosophers actively conducting research in this area. I discuss two books on the new field: Margaret A. Boden's The philosophy of artificial life and Christopher G. (...)'s Artificial life: an overview. They cover three areas of philosophical interest: the definition of life, the relationship between life and mind, and the possibility of creating life within a computational environment. This discussion allows me to critique past work in the philosophy of ALife that tends to see the field as a proving ground for traditional arguments from the philosophy of artificial intelligence. Instead, I suggest, what is interesting about ALife is how it differs from artificial intelligence and that the most interesting philosophical issues in the area are those derived from biology, not psychology. I recommend that these two books taken together constitute an interesting introduction to ALife and the wealth of philosophical issues found therein. (shrink)
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  25. Christopher T. Kello, Gregory G. Anderson, John G. Holden & Guy C. Van Orden (2008). The Pervasiveness of 1/F Scaling in Speech Reflects the Metastable Basis of Cognition. Cognitive Science 32 (7):1217-1231.score: 13.5
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  26. Christopher A. Dickinson & Gregory J. Zelinsky (2013). New Evidence for Strategic Differences Between Static and Dynamic Search Tasks: An Individual Observer Analysis of Eye Movements. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 13.5
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  27. Catherine Rowett (2013). Christopher Stead. Studia Patristica 53 (1):17-30.score: 12.0
    Professor Christopher Stead was Ely Professor of Divinity from 1971 until his retirement in 1980 and one of the great contributors to the Oxford Patristic Conferences for many years. In this paper I reflect on his work in Patristics, and I attempt to understand how his interests diverged from the other major contributors in the same period, and how they were formed by his philosophical milieu and the spirit of the age. As a case study to illustrate and diagnose (...)
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  28. Lynne Spellman (2011). Basil of Caesarea, Gregory of Nyssa, and the Transformation of Divine Simplicity (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 49 (1):117-118.score: 12.0
    In this study, Andrew Radde-Gallwitz argues that Basil and Gregory develop an understanding of divine simplicity which does not require that God be identical with the properties of God or that these be identical with one another. Their motivation is that they want to hold that we cannot, in all eternity, know God's essence and yet that we have knowledge of God. Radde-Gallwitz argues that, for Basil and especially Gregory, in addition to our "conceptualizations" (epinoiai), we also have (...)
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  29. Lucy Allais (2006). Intrinsic Natures: A Critique of Langton on Kant. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 73 (1):143–169.score: 12.0
    This paper argues that there is an important respect in which Rae Langton's recent interpretation of Kant is correct: Kant's claim that we cannot know things in themselves should be understood as the claim that we cannot know the intrinsic nature of things. However, I dispute Langton's account of intrinsic properties, and therefore her version of what this claim amounts to. Langton's distinction between intrinsic, causally inert properties and causal powers is problematic, both as an interpretation of (...)
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  30. Ken Levy (2009). On the Rationalist Solution to Gregory Kavka's Toxin Puzzle. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 90 (2):267-289.score: 12.0
    Gregory Kavka's 'Toxin Puzzle' suggests that I cannot intend to perform a counter-preferential action A even if I have a strong self-interested reason to form this intention. The 'Rationalist Solution,' however, suggests that I can form this intention. For even though it is counter-preferential, A-ing is actually rational given that the intention behind it is rational. Two arguments are offered for this proposition that the rationality of the intention to A transfers to A-ing itself: the 'Self-Promise Argument' and David (...)
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  31. Jennifer Hornsby, Louise Antony, Jennifer Saul, Natalie Stoljar, Nellie Wieland & Rae Langton (2012). Review Symposium: Rae Langton, Sexual Solipsism: Philosophical Essays on Pornography and Objectification. Jurisprudence 2 (2):379-440.score: 12.0
  32. Christopher Gregory Weaver (2013). A Church-Fitch Proof for the Universality of Causation. Synthese 190 (14):2749-2772.score: 12.0
    In an attempt to improve upon Alexander Pruss’s work (The principle of sufficient reason: A reassessment, pp. 240–248, 2006), I (Weaver, Synthese 184(3):299–317, 2012) have argued that if all purely contingent events could be caused and something like a Lewisian analysis of causation is true (per, Lewis’s, Causation as influence, reprinted in: Collins, Hall and paul. Causation and counterfactuals, 2004), then all purely contingent events have causes. I dubbed the derivation of the universality of causation the “Lewisian argument”. The Lewisian (...)
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  33. Harvey Siegel (2008). Autonomy, Critical Thinking and the Wittgensteinian Legacy: Reflections on Christopher Winch, Education, Autonomy and Critical Thinking. Journal of Philosophy of Education 42 (1):165-184.score: 12.0
    In this review of Christopher Winch's new book, Education, Autonomy and Critical Thinking (2006), I discuss its main theses, supporting some and criticising others. In particular, I take issue with several of Winch's claims and arguments concerning critical thinking and rationality, and deplore his reliance on what I suggest are problematic strains of the later Wittgenstein. But these criticisms are not such as to upend Winch's powerful critique of antiperfectionism and 'strong autonomy' or his defence of 'weak autonomy'. His (...)
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  34. Margrethe Bruun Vaage (2009). The Role of Empathy in Gregory Currie's Philosophy of Film. British Journal of Aesthetics 49 (2):109-128.score: 12.0
    Although Gregory Currie is often presented as a strong defender of empathic simulation as part of spectator engagement, this paper questions the importance of empathy in Currie's philosophy of film. Currie's account of the imagination is too propositional, and his account of a more sensuous and experiential kind of imagining is found wanting. While giving a convincing account of impersonal imagining in relation to fiction film, Currie does not sufficiently explain what empathy is, and what relation it has to (...)
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  35. Jeanette Bicknell (2010). Love, Beauty, and Yeats's "Anne Gregory". Philosophy and Literature 34 (2):348-358.score: 12.0
    So begins "For Anne Gregory," published by W. B. Yeats in 1933. It is surely one of his most charming poems.1 The poem's lilting rhythm and affectionate tone effectively soften—even disguise—what is arguably a dark and dismaying message. Anne is destined to be loved not for herself alone, but for an accidental physical attribute—her blond hair. Why do I claim that the poem's message is dark? Why should it dismay Anne if she is loved for the beauty of her (...)
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  36. Tyler Burge & Christopher Peacocke (1996). Our Entitlement to Self-Knowledge: II. Christopher Peacocke: Entitlement, Self-Knowledge and Conceptual Redeployment. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 96:117 - 158.score: 12.0
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  37. Jeff Malpas (2004). Holism, Realism, and Truth: How to Be an Anti-Relativist and Not Give Up on Heidegger (or Davidson) - a Debate with Christopher Norris. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 12 (3):339 – 356.score: 12.0
    Responding to criticisms raised by Christopher Norris, this paper defends an anti-relativist reading of the work of both Davidson and Heidegger arguing that that there are important lessons to be learnt from their example - one can thus be an anti-relativist (as well as a certain sort of realist) without giving up on Davidson or on Heidegger.
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  38. Ralph Wedgwood (2007). Christopher Peacocke's The Realm of Reason. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 74 (3):776-791.score: 12.0
    In this book, Christopher Peacocke proposes a general theory about what it is for a thinker to be entitled to form a given belief. This theory is distinctively rationalist: that is, it gives a large role to the a priori, while insisting that the propositions or contents that can be known a priori are not in any way “true in virtue of meaning” (and without in any other way denigrating these propositions as “trivial”, or as propositions that “tell us (...)
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  39. Deirdre Golash (2006). Marriage, Autonomy, and the State: Reply to Christopher Bennett. Res Publica 12 (2):179-190.score: 12.0
    Christopher Bennett has argued that state support of conjugal relationships can be founded on the unique contribution such relationships make to the autonomy of their participants by providing them with various forms of recognition and support unavailable elsewhere. I argue that, in part because a long history of interaction between two people who need each other’s validation tends to produce less meaningful responses over time, long-term conjugal relationships are unlikely to provide autonomy-enhancing support to their participants. To the extent (...)
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  40. Erhan Demircioglu (2012). Christopher Hill: Consciousness. [REVIEW] Erkenntnis 77 (1):149-154.score: 12.0
    Christopher Hill: Consciousness Content Type Journal Article Category Book Review Pages 1-6 DOI 10.1007/s10670-012-9373-8 Authors Erhan Demircioglu, Koc University, Rumeli Feneri Yolu, 34450 Sariyer, Istanbul, Turkey Journal Erkenntnis Online ISSN 1572-8420 Print ISSN 0165-0106.
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  41. Patrick Toner (2007). Thomas Versus Tibbles: A Critical Study of Christopher Brown's Aquinas and the Ship of Theseus. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 81 (4):639-653.score: 12.0
    In his recent book, Aquinas and the Ship of Theseus, Christopher Brown has argued that the metaphysics of St. Thomas is preferable to contemporary analyticviews because it can solve the “problem of material constitution” (PMC) without requiring us to relinquish any of the common-sense beliefs that generate that problem. In this critical study, I show that in the case of both substances and aggregates, Brown’s Aquinas endorses views that are extremely implausible. Consequently, even if it is granted that the (...)
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  42. Christopher Gregory Weaver (2011). Erratum To: What Could Be Caused Must Actually Be Caused. Synthese 183 (2):279-279.score: 12.0
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  43. Robert McRuer (2002). Critical Investments: AIDS, Christopher Reeve, and Queer/Disability Studies. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities 23 (3-4):221-237.score: 12.0
    In his contribution, “Critical Investments: AIDS, Christopher Reeve, and Queer/Disability Studies,” Robert McRuer calls for the recognition of the points of convergence between AIDS theory, queer theory, and disability theory. McRuer points out ways in which minority identity groups such as people with AIDS, gays, lesbians, and bisexuals, and those with so-called disabilities, whose status has been described by others as “impaired,” have resisted this judgment by calling its ideological underpinnings into question. He contends that a critical alliance between (...)
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  44. Franziska Felder (2011). D. Christopher Ralston; Justin Ho (Eds.): Philosophical Reflections on Disability. [REVIEW] Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 14 (2):247-249.score: 12.0
    D. Christopher Ralston; Justin Ho (Eds.): Philosophical Reflections on Disability Content Type Journal Article Pages 247-249 DOI 10.1007/s10677-010-9237-8 Authors Franziska Felder, Ethikzentrum der Universität Zürich, Graduiertenprogramm für Interdisziplinäre Ethikforschung, Zollikerstrasse 115, 8008 Zürich, Switzerland Journal Ethical Theory and Moral Practice Online ISSN 1572-8447 Print ISSN 1386-2820 Journal Volume Volume 14 Journal Issue Volume 14, Number 2.
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  45. James K. A. Smith (2011). Formation, Grace, and Pneumatology: Or, Where's the Spirit in Gregory's Augustine? Journal of Religious Ethics 39 (3):556-569.score: 12.0
    Eric Gregory's Politics and the Order of Love takes up an audacious project: enlisting Saint Augustine in order to "help imagine a better liberalism." This article first provides a summary of Gregory's argument, focusing on his emphasis on love as a "motivation" for neighborly care, and hence democratic participation. This involves tracing the theme of motivation in the book, which is tied to his articulation of liberal perfectionism and an emphasis on civic virtue. In conclusion I raise the (...)
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  46. Wayne A. Davis (2005). Concepts and Epistemic Individuation (Christopher Peacocke). Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 70 (2):290-325.score: 12.0
    Christopher Peacocke has presented an original version of the perennial philosophical thesis that we can gain substantive metaphysical and epistemological insight from an analysis of our concepts. Peacocke's innovation is to look at how concepts are individuated by their possession conditions, which he believes can be specified in terms of conditions in which certain propositions containing those concepts are accepted. The ability to provide such insight is one of Peacocke's major arguments for his theory of concepts. I will critically (...)
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  47. Patrick Blackburn & Maarten Marx (2002). Remarks on Gregory's “Actually” Operator. Journal of Philosophical Logic 31 (3):281-288.score: 12.0
    In this note we show that the classical modal technology of Sahlqvist formulas gives quick proofs of the completeness theorems in [8] (D. Gregory, Completeness and decidability results for some propositional modal logics containing "actually" operators, Journal of Philosophical Logic 30(1): 57-78, 2001) and vastly generalizes them. Moreover, as a corollary, interpolation theorems for the logics considered in [8] are obtained. We then compare Gregory's modal language enriched with an "actually" operator with the work of Arthur Prior now (...)
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  48. Nicholaos Jones (2008). Evidence and Falsification: Challenges to Gregory Peterson. Zygon 43 (3):599-604.score: 12.0
    In this reply to Gregory Peterson's essay "Maintaining Respectability," which itself is a response to my "Is Theology Respectable as Metaphysics?" I elaborate upon my claims that theology treats God's existence as an absolute certainty immune to refutation and that modern science constitutes the canons of respectable reasoning for metaphysical disciplines. I conclude with some comments on Peterson's "In Praise of Folly? Theology and the University.".
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  49. Gregory J. Morgan (2008). Mohan Matthen and Christopher Stephens:Handbook of the Philosophy of Science: Philosophy of Biology,:Handbook of the Philosophy of Science: Philosophy of Biology. Philosophy of Science 75 (2):246-249.score: 12.0
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  50. Carmelo Marabello & Martino Doni (2009). On The (Double) Bind of Representation: From Gregory Bateson to Wim Wenders. World Futures 65 (8):596-604.score: 12.0
    What follows is the elaboration of a series of discussions held by the two authors at a seminar during which we tried to “read” Wim Wenders's Lisbon Story starting from Gregory Bateson's double bind theory. These discussions then developed into writings that were intertwined, hybridized, corrected, extended, and cut. We experimented directly with the game of relationships, the “mess that works” of the difficult distinction between map and territory, between epistemology and cinematography. Emerging from general considerations on cinema is (...)
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