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  1. Christopher Cowley (2013). Euthanasia in Psychiatry Can Never Be Justified. A Reply to Wijsbek. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 34 (3):227-238.
    In a recent article, Henri Wijsbek discusses the 1991 Chabot “psychiatric euthanasia” case in the Netherlands, and argues that Chabot was justified in helping his patient to die. Dutch legislation at the time permitted physician assisted suicide when the patient’s condition is severe, hopeless, and unbearable. The Dutch Supreme Court agreed with Chabot that the patient met these criteria because of her justified depression, even though she was somatically healthy. Wijsbek argues that in this case, the patient’s integrity had been (...)
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  2. Christopher Cowley (2012). The Ethics of Forgiveness: A Collection of Essays. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 20 (2):289-294.
    International Journal of Philosophical Studies, Volume 20, Issue 2, Page 289-294, May 2012.
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  3. Christopher Cowley (2011). Expertise, Wisdom and Moral Philosophers: A Response to Gesang. Bioethics 26 (6):337-342.
    In a recent issue of Bioethics, Bernard Gesang asks whether a moral philosopher possesses greater moral expertise than a non-philosopher, and his answer is a qualified yes, based not so much on his infallible access to the truth, but on the quality of his theoretically-informed moral justifications. I reject Gesang's claim that there is such a thing as moral expertise, although the moral philosopher may well make a valid contribution to the ethics committee as a concerned and educated citizen. I (...)
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  4. Christopher Cowley (2011). Understanding Another's Wrongdoing. Philosophy and Literature 35 (1):79-90.
    In Dostoyevsky's Crime and Punishment, Rodion Romanovich Raskolnikov is an impoverished university student who commits a brutal double-murder of an old money-lender and her sister, and then for much of the novel manages to evade detection.1 He is racked by guilt and anxiety from the act. Sonia is a young woman who lives with her parents and several siblings. Her father is an alcoholic, unable to hold down a job, and Sonia has therefore become a prostitute to support the family. (...)
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  5. Christopher Cowley (2010). Learning to Love. Philosophical Topics 38 (1):1-15.
    Imagine that you find yourself in a situation of considerable adversity and apparent permanence. Does it make sense for me to advise you to learn to love your situation? I argue that such advice is capable of a robust meaning beyond the mere expression of compassion, and far beyond the pragmatic advice to ‘accept it’ or ‘make the best of it’. I respond to the objections that love cannot be commanded, and that I am counselling pernicious forms of self-deception or (...)
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  6. Christopher Cowley (2010). Why Genuine Forgiveness Must Be Elective and Unconditional. Ethical Perspectives 17 (4):556.
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  7. Christopher Cowley (2008). Book Reviews. [REVIEW] Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 11 (3):347-351.
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  8. Christopher Cowley (2007). Medical Ethics, Ordinary Concepts, and Ordinary Lives. Palgrave Macmillan.
    Mainstream philosophical discussions of ethics usually involve either a search for a problem-solving theory (such as utilitarianism), or an exploration of ontological status (of things like obligations or reasons). This book will argue that such efforts are often misplaced. Instead, the proper starting point should always be the actual words and deeds of ordinary people in ordinary disagreements; for the ethical concepts in play can only derive their full meaning within the context of ordinary human lives. This will require a (...)
     
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  9. Christopher Cowley (2006). Suicide is Neither Rational nor Irrational. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 9 (5):495 - 504.
    Richard Brandt, following Hume, famously argued that suicide could be rational. In this he was going against a common ‘absolutist’ view that suicide is irrational almost by definition. Arguments to the effect that suicide is morally permissible or prohibited tend to follow from one’s position on this first issue of rationality. I want to argue that the concept of rationality is not appropriately ascribed – or withheld – to the victim or the act or the desire to commit the act. (...)
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  10. Christopher Cowley (2006). The Role of Perspectives in Ethics. Ethical Perspectives 13 (1):11-30.
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  11. Christopher Cowley & Alena Dvorakova (2006). Richard Terdiman, Body and Story: The Ethics and Practice of Theoretical Conflict Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 26 (3):225-227.
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  12. Christopher Cowley (2005). A New Defence of Williams's Reasons-Internalism. Philosophical Investigations 28 (4):346–368.
  13. Christopher Cowley (2005). A New Rejection of Moral Expertise. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 8 (3):273-279.
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  14. Christopher Cowley (2005). Changing One's Mind on Moral Matters. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 8 (3):277 - 290.
    Contemporary moral philosophy assumes an account of what it means to legitimately change one’s mind in ethics, and I wish to challenge this account by enlarging the category of the legitimate. I am just as eager to avoid illegitimate mind-changing brought on by deceit or brainwashing, but I claim that legitimacy should be defined in terms of transparency of method. A social reformer should not be embarrassed to admit that he acquired many beliefs about justice while reading Dickens. As such, (...)
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  15. Christopher Cowley (2004). Moral Necessity and the Personal. Croatian Journal of Philosophy 4 (1):123-138.
    I claim that the dominant moral-realist understanding of action and moral responsibility cannot provide a comprehensive account of morality since it neglects the irreducibly personal component of the individual’s moral experience. This is not to embrace non-cognitivism, however; indeed, I challenge the whole realist framework of most contemporary moral philosophy. To this end I explore the phenomenon of moral necessity, exemplified by Luther’s declaration that he “has to” continue his protests against the church. I am careful to distinguish this kind (...)
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  16. Christopher Cowley (2004). The Diane Pretty Case and the Occasional Impotence of Justification in Ethics. Ethical Perspectives 11 (4):250-258.
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  17. Christopher Cowley (2003). The Conjoined Twins and the Limits of Rationality in Applied Ethics. Bioethics 17 (1):69–88.
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