28 found
Order:
  1.  93
    Sarah-Jayne Blakemore, Daniel M. Wolpert & Christopher D. Frith (2002). Abnormalities in the Awareness of Action. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 6 (6):237-242.
  2. Christopher D. Frith, S. J. Blakemore & D. Wolpert (2000). Explaining the Symptoms of Schizophrenia: Abnormalities in the Awareness of Action. Brain Research Reviews 31 (2):357-363.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   45 citations  
  3. Christopher D. Frith (2002). Attention to Action and Awareness of Other Minds. Consciousness and Cognition 11 (4):481-487.
    We have only limited awareness of the system by which we control our actions and this limited awareness does not seem to be concerned with the control of action. Awareness of choosing one action rather than another comes after the choice has been made, while awareness of initiating an action occurs before the movement has begun. These temporal differences bind together in consciousness the intention to act and the consequences of the action. This creates our sense of agency. Activity in (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   11 citations  
  4. Geraint Rees, C. Russell, Christopher D. Frith & Julia Driver (1999). Inattentional Blindness Versus Inattentional Amnesia for Fixated but Ignored Words. Science 286 (5449):2504-7.
  5.  60
    Diane Beck, Geraint Rees, Christopher D. Frith & Nilli Lavie (2001). Neural Correlates of Change Detection and Change Blindness. Nature Neuroscience 4 (6):645-650.
  6.  32
    Geraint Rees, E. Wojciulik, Karen Clarke, Masud Husain, Christopher D. Frith & Julia Driver (2000). Unconscious Activation of Visual Cortex in the Damaged Right Hemisphere of a Parietal Patient with Extinction. Brain 123 (8):1624-1633.
  7.  91
    Jakob Hohwy & Christopher D. Frith (2004). Can Neuroscience Explain Consciousness? Journal of Consciousness Studies 11 (7-8):180-198.
    Cognitive neuroscience aspires to explain how the brain produces conscious states. Many people think this aspiration is threatened by the subjective nature of introspective reports, as well as by certain philosophical arguments. We propose that good neuroscientific explanations of conscious states can consolidate an interpretation of introspective reports, in spite of their subjective nature. This is because the relative quality of explanations can be evaluated on independent, methodological grounds. To illustrate, we review studies that suggest that aspects of the feeling (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  8.  42
    Geraint Rees, E. Wojciulik, Karen Clarke, Masud Husain & Christopher D. Frith (2002). Neural Correlates of Conscious and Unconscious Vision in Parietal Extinction. Neurocase 8 (5):387-393.
  9. Christopher D. Frith & Hakwan C. Lau (2006). The Problem of Introspection. Consciousness and Cognition 15 (4):761-764.
  10.  29
    Christopher D. Frith (1996). The Role of the Prefrontal Cortex in Self-Consciousness: The Case of Auditory Hallucinations. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London B 351:1505-12.
  11.  46
    C. Portas, Geraint Rees, A. Howseman, O. Josephs, R. Turner & Christopher D. Frith (1998). A Specific Role for the Thalamus in Mediating the Interaction of Attention and Arousal in Humans. Journal of Neuroscience 18 (21):8979-8989.
  12.  87
    Christopher D. Frith (1979). Consciousness, Information Processing and Schizophrenia. British Journal of Psychiatry 134:225-35.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  13.  76
    Christopher D. Frith & Shaun Gallagher (2002). Models of the Pathological Mind. Journal of Consciousness Studies 9 (4):57-80.
    Christopher Frith is a research professor at the Functional Imaging Laboratory of the Wellcome Department of Imaging Neuroscience at University College, London. He explores, experimentally, using the techniques of functional brain imaging, the relationship between human consciousness and the brain. His research focuses on questions pertaining to perception, attention, control of action, free will, and awareness of our own mental states and those of others. As the following discussion makes clear, Frith investigates brain systems involved in the choice of one (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  14.  75
    Christopher D. Frith (1996). Commentary on Free Will in the Light of Neuropsychiatry. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 3 (2):91-93.
  15. Almut Engelien, W. Huber, D. Silbersweig, E. Stern, Christopher D. Frith, W. Doring, A. Thron & R. S. J. Frachowiak (2000). The Neural Correlates of 'Deaf-Hearing' in Man. Conscious Sensory Awareness Enabled by Attentional Modulation. Brain 123 (3):532-545.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  16. Christopher D. Frith & Geraint Rees (2007). A Brief History of the Scientific Approach to the Study of Consciousness. In Max Velmans & Susan Schneider (eds.), The Blackwell Companion to Consciousness. Blackwell
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  17.  6
    Jan W. De Fockert, Geraint Rees, Christopher D. Frith & Nilli Lavie (2007). GOLDSMITHS Research Online. Journal of Experimental Psychology 33 (3):738-742.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  18.  1
    Christopher D. Frith (2001). Commentary on Revonsuo's Can Functional Brain Imaging Discover Consciousness in the Brain?. Journal of Consciousness Studies 8 (3):30.
    Antti Revonsuo has given us an engaging and deliberately provocative paper discussing the value of brain imaging in the search for the neural basis of consciousness. In some places, however, his enthusiasm for the controversial nature of the topic has led him to overstate or misdirect his case.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  19.  22
    Christopher D. Frith (1992). Consciousness, Information Processing, and the Brain. Journal of Psychopharmacology 6:436-40.
  20.  28
    Jakob Hohwy & Christopher D. Frith (2004). The Neural Correlates of Consciousness: Room for Improvement, but on the Right Track: Comment. Journal of Consciousness Studies 11 (1):45-51.
  21.  3
    Jonathan Cole, Marcelo Dascal, Shaun Gallagher & Christopher D. Frith (2010). Concluding Discussion. Pragmatics and Cognition 18 (3):553-559.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  22.  3
    Christopher D. Frith (2010). What is Consciousness For? Pragmatics and Cognition 18 (3):497-551.
    In the first talk I discuss recent experiments designed to elucidate the neural correlates of consciousness. Implicit in this discussion are operational definitions of what I mean by consciousness. In the second talk I explore the extent to which we are conscious of being in control of our actions, our sense of agency. I raise the question of why we need to be aware of actions at all since we can achieve so much without such awareness. In the final talk (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  23.  1
    Christopher D. Frith & Karl J. Friston (1997). Studying Brain Function with Neuroimaging. In M. D. Rugg (ed.), Cognitive Neuroscience. MIT Press 169--195.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  24. Diane Beck, Geraint Rees, Christopher D. Frith & Nilli Lavie (2001). Change Blindness and Change Awareness. Nature Neuroscience 4.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  25. Almut Engelien, W. Huber, D. Silbersweig, Christopher D. Frith & R. S. J. Frachowiak (2000). The Neural Correlates of 'Deaf-Hearing' in Man. Brain 123:532-545.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  26. Christopher D. Frith (2003). The Scientific Study of Consciousness. In Maria A. Ron & Trevor W. Robbins (eds.), Disorders of Brain and Mind 2. Cambridge University Press 197-222.
  27. Jakob Hohwy & Christopher D. Frith (2004). Peer Commentary on Are There Neural Correlates of Consciousness?. Journal of Consciousness Studies 11 (1):45-51.
  28. Geraint Rees & Christopher D. Frith (2007). Methodologies for Identifying the Neural Correlates of Consciousness. In Max Velmans & Susan Schneider (eds.), The Blackwell Companion to Consciousness. Blackwell