5 found
Sort by:
See also:
Profile: Christopher D. Horvath (Illinois State University)
  1. Christopher D. Horvath (2001). Monad to Man. International Studies in Philosophy 33 (4):140-142.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Christopher D. Horvath (2000). Interactionism and Innateness in the Evolutionary Study of Human Nature. Biology and Philosophy 15 (3):321-337.
    While most researchers who use evolutionary theory to investigatehuman nature especially human sexuality describe themselves as ``interactionists'', there is no clear consensus on the meaning of thisterm in this context. By interactionism most people in the fieldmean something like, both nature and nurture ``count'' in thedevelopment of human psychology and behavior. Nevertheless, themultidisciplinary nature of evolutionary psychology results in a widevariety of interpretations of this general claim. Today, mostdebates within evolutionary psychology about the innateness of agiven behavioral characteristic or over (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Christopher D. Horvath (1999). Measuring Gender. Biology and Philosophy 14 (4):505-519.
    Over the past several years, various operational definitions of gender have been used in studies of gender conformity in homosexual males. The goal of these studies is to demonstrate that childhood gender nonconformity (CGN) is either the proximate cause of adult homosexuality or an intermediate step in a biologically mediated process. The hypothesis of a causal connection between the development of gender and sexual orientation is embedded within the context of a biological (evolutionary) understanding of human behavior. Thus, testing the (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Christopher D. Horvath (1997). Discussion: Phylogenetic Species Concept: Pluralism, Monism, and History. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 12 (2):225-232.
    Species serve as both the basic units of macroevolutionary studies and as the basic units of taxonomic classification. In this paper I argue that the taxa identified as species by the Phylogenetic Species Concept (Mishler and Brandon 1987) are the units of biological organization most causally relevant to the evolutionary process but that such units exist at multiple levels within the hierarchy of any phylogenetic lineage. The PSC gives us no way of identifying one of these levels as the privileged (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Christopher D. Horvath (1997). Some Questions About Identifying Individuals: Failed Intuitions About Organisms and Species. Philosophy of Science 64 (4):654-668.
    Treating species as individuals and not classes has been crucial to the integration of evolutionary theory with modern systematics. Despite the theoretically important role the concept of individuality plays in modern phylogenetic systematics and in evolutionary theory more generally, many have been content to rely on common-sense intuitions about what counts as an individual. One of the most often cited intuitions is that individuals should be defined intrinsically. Unfortunately, common-sense intuitions like this one have proven to be inadequate for identifying (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation