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Profile: Christopher Freiman (College of William and Mary)
  1. Christopher Freiman (2014). Analogical Arguments for Egalitarianism. Ratio 27 (2):222-237.
    Egalitarians sometimes analogize socioeconomic opportunities to starting gates, playing fields, and the results of a lottery. A fair game is one in which all have an equal opportunity to succeed; egalitarians propose that the same is true of a fair society. A second type of argument for egalitarianism appeals to intuitions about the distribution of found resources. A just division of manna discovered on a strange planet seems to be an equal one. Both types of argument share a crucial feature: (...)
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  2. Christopher Freiman (2014). Goodness and Moral Twin Earth. Erkenntnis 79 (2):445-460.
    Terry Horgan and Mark Timmons’s “Moral Twin Earth” thought experiment allegedly undercuts virtually any form of naturalist moral realism. I argue that a neo-Aristotelian conception of moral properties defeats Moral Twin Earth. Developing themes in the work of Peter Geach, Philippa Foot, and Rosalind Hursthouse, I sketch an Aristotelian moral semantics that is unique in construing terms like ‘right’ and ‘good’ exclusively as attributive adjectives that denote relational properties. On this view, moral goodness is a relational property predicated of those (...)
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  3. Christopher Freiman (2014). Priority and Position. Philosophical Studies 167 (2):341-360.
    Positional goods are goods whose relative amount determines their absolute value. Many goods appear to have positional aspects. For example, one’s relative standing in the distribution of education and wealth may determine one’s absolute condition with respect to goods like employment opportunities, self-respect, and social inclusion. Positional goods feature in recent arguments from T.M. Scanlon, Brian Barry, and Harry Brighouse and Adam Swift that assert that we should favor egalitarian distributions of positional goods even if we reject equality as a (...)
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  4. Christopher Freiman (2014). Vote Markets. :1-16.
    Vote markets. . ???aop.label???. doi: 10.1080/00048402.2014.892147.
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  5. Christopher Freiman (2013). Cosmopolitanism Within Borders: On Behalf of Charter Cities. Journal of Applied Philosophy 30 (1):40-52.
    Economist Paul Romer proposes the establishment of charter cities. Charter cities would resemble special economic zones; that is, small regions that experiment with economic rules that differ from those governing their larger ‘host’ countries. Yet unlike a special economic zone, a charter city would also experiment with its own legal and political rules. The rules, in turn, can be enforced by a third-party coalition of representatives of foreign countries that enforce these rules at home. Host countries that face problems of (...)
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  6. Christopher Freiman (2013). Utilitarianism and Public Justification. Journal of Social Philosophy 44 (3):250-269.
  7. Christopher Freiman (2012). David Schmidtz and Christopher Freiman. In David Estlund (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Political Philosophy. Oxford University Press, Usa. 411.
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  8. Christopher Freiman (2012). Equal Political Liberties. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 93 (2):158-174.
    Formal guarantees of political equality are compatible with inequalities in the value of political liberties, as individuals may convert their socioeconomic advantages into political advantages. Perhaps the predominant strategy for limiting substantive political inequalities recommends limiting inequalities in the means of acquiring political power for private gain – most notably, economic means. I express a worry that measures instituted to restrict economic inequalities may do more to frustrate the cause of political equality than to further it. I argue that attempts (...)
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  9. Christopher Freiman (2012). Why Poverty Matters Most: Towards a Humanitarian Theory of Social Justice. Utilitas 24 (01):26-40.
    Sufficientarians claim that what matters most is that people have enough. I develop and defend a revised sufficientarian conception of justice. I claim that it furnishes the best specification of a general humanitarian ideal of social justice: our main moral concern should be helping those who are badly off in absolute terms. Rival humanitarian views such as egalitarianism, prioritarianism and the difference principle face serious objections from which sufficientarianism is exempt. Moreover, a revised conception of sufficientarianism can meet the most (...)
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  10. Christopher Freiman & Shaun Nichols (2011). Is Desert in the Details? Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 82 (1):121-133.
  11. Christopher Freiman (2010). Why Be Immoral? Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 13 (2):191 - 205.
    Developing themes in the work of Thomas Hill, I argue that servility is an underappreciated but pervasive reason for moral transgression. Recognizing servility as a basic cause of immorality obliges us to reconsider questions about the rationality of morality. Traditional answers to the problem of the immoralist, which tend to be stated in terms of enlightened self-interest, fail to properly engage the problems posed by 'servile immorality.' In response to these problems, I develop a Humean version of a traditionally Kantian (...)
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  12. Christopher Freiman (2009). Goodwill Toward Nature. Environmental Values 18 (3):343 - 359.
    It is sometimes claimed that an ethical relationship with nature is analogous to Aristotelian friendship. Aristotle claims that friends are valuable principally in virtue of providing reflections of ourselves; yet extant accounts of environmental friendship do not explain how nonhuman organisms can satisfy this role. Recent work in neo-Aristotelian metaethics delineates a theory of value that underscores the similarities between the biological evaluations we make of living things and the moral evaluations we make of ourselves. I argue that these similarities (...)
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  13. Christopher Freiman (2006). Book Review: Edited by Ronald Sandler and Philip Cafaro. Environmental Virtue Ethics. New York and Oxford: Rowman & Littlefield, 2005. [REVIEW] Ethics and the Environment 11 (1):133-138.
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  14. Christopher Freiman (2006). Environmental Virtue Ethics (Review). Ethics and the Environment 11 (1):133-138.
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