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Profile: Christopher Framarin (University of Calgary)
  1. Christopher G. Framarin (2014). HInduism and Environmental Ethics: Law, Literature, and Philosophy. Routledge.
    ... the Earth, San Francisco, CA: Sierra Club Books. Hill Jr., T. (2006)aFinding Value inNature«, Environmental Values 15(3): 331¥41. ¦¦(1983) aIdeals of Human Excellence and Preserving Natural Environments«, Environmental Ethics 5(3): ...
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  2. Christopher G. Framarin (2014). The Moral Standing of Animals and Plants in the Manusmṛti. Philosophy East and West 64 (1):192-217.
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  3. Christopher G. Framarin (2013). Environmental Ethics and the Mahābhārata: The Case of the Burning of the {\Text{Kh}}\Overline {\Text{a}} \Mathop{\Text{N}}\Limits{ \Cdot } \Mathop{\Text{D}}\Limits{ \Cdot } {\Text{Ava}} Forest. [REVIEW] Sophia 52 (1):185-204.
    Environmental Ethics and the Mahābhārata : The Case of the Burning of the Forest Content Type Journal Article Pages 1-20 DOI 10.1007/s11841-011-0264-2 Authors Christopher G. Framarin, Department of Philosophy, University of Calgary, 2500 University Dr. NW, Calgary, AB T2N 1N4, Canada Journal Sophia Online ISSN 1873-930X Print ISSN 0038-1527.
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  4. Christopher G. Framarin (2013). Environmental Ethics and the Mahābhārata: The Case of the Burning of the [FORMULA] Forest. Sophia 52 (1):185-204.
     
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  5. Christopher G. Framarin (2012). Hinduism and Environmental Ethics: An Analysis and Defense of a Basic Assumption. Asian Philosophy 22 (1):75-91.
    The literature on Hinduism and the environment is vast, and growing quickly. It has benefitted greatly from the work of scholars in a wide range of disciplines, such as religious studies, Asian studies, history, anthropology, political science, and so on. At the same time, much of this work fails to define key terms and make fundamental assumptions explicit. Consequently, it is at least initially difficult to engage with it philosophically. In the first section of this paper, I clarify a central, (...)
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  6. Christopher G. Framarin (2011). Response to Joydeep Bagchee's "the Bhagavadgītā : Philosophy Versus Historicism. Philosophy East and West 61 (4):718-720.
    My thanks to Joydeep Bagchee for his review of my book in this issue of Philosophy East and West. Here I will respond to some of his objections, and offer some points of clarification. First, I want to say something about Bagchee's claim that the earlier papers in which I worked out some of my thoughts on the issue of desireless action are relevant to understanding the book. Bagchee seems to mean this as a criticism, since he says,Each chapter marks (...)
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  7. Christopher G. Framarin (2011). Ātman, Identity, and Emanation: Arguments for a Hindu Environmental Ethic. Comparative Philosophy 2 (1).
    Many contemporary authors argue that since certain Hindu texts and traditions claim that all living beings are fundamentally the same as Brahman (God), these texts and traditions provide the basis for an environmental ethic. I outline three common versions of this argument, and argue that each fails to meet at least one criterion for an environmental ethic. This doesn’t mean, however, that certain Hindu texts and traditions do not provide the basis for an environmental ethic. In the last section of (...)
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  8. Christopher G. Framarin (2011). The Value of Nature in Indian (Hindu) Traditions. Religious Studies 47 (3):285 - 300.
    Many authors claim that certain Indian (Hindu) texts and traditions deny that nature has intrinsic value. If nature has value at all, it has value only as a means to mokṡa (liberation). This view is implausible as an interpretation of any Indian tradition that accepts the doctrines of ahiṁsā (non-harm) and karma. The proponent must explain the connection between ahiṁsā and merit by citing the connection between ahiṁsā and mokṡa: ahiṁsā is valuable, and therefore produces merit, because ahiṁsā is instrumentally (...)
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  9. Christopher G. Framarin & Hindu Studies Series (2010). Objection), or It is Causally Determined (Undermining Goetz's Allegiance to Non-Causal Agency). I Suspect That Confusion Over Equivocal Uses of 'Choice'may Explain Why Someone Would Say That a Reason for an Action (Say Ra2) is the Reason for a Choice, Even When It is Neither Intrinsically More Compelling Than Other Reasons for Action. Religious Studies 46 (2010).
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  10. Christopher G. Framarin (2009). Desire and Motivation in Indian Philosophy. Routledge.
    They conclude that desireless action is action performed without certain desires; other desires are permissible.In this book, the author surveys the ...
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  11. Christopher G. Framarin (2008). Motivation-Encompassing Attitudes. Philosophical Explorations 11 (2):121 – 130.
    Alfred R. Mele defends a broadly 'Humean' theory of motivation. One common dispute between Humeans and anti-Humeans has to do with whether or not a desire is required to motivate action. For the most part Mele avoids this dispute. He claims that there are reasons to think that beliefs cannot motivate action, but finally allows that it might be that it is a contingent fact that beliefs can motivate action in human beings. Instead Mele argues for the claim that certain (...)
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  12. Christopher G. Framarin (2008). Motivation in the Nyāyasūtra and Brahmasiddhi. Religious Studies 44 (1):43-61.
    One common interpretation of the orthodox Indian prohibition on desire is that it is a prohibition on phenomenologically salient desires. The Nyāyasūtra and Brahmasiddhi seem to support this view. I argue that this interpretation is mistaken. The Vedāntins draw a distinction between counting some fact as a reason for acting (icchā) and counting one's desire (rāga) as a reason for acting, and prohibit the latter. The Naiyāyikas draw a distinction between desiring to avoid some state of affairs (dveṣa) and believing (...)
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  13. Christopher G. Framarin (2008). Unselfishness. International Philosophical Quarterly 48 (1):69-83.
    In this paper I argue that the prohibition on desire in the orthodox Indian systems is not simply a prohibition on selfish desires. The word “selfish” is ambiguous. It can mean either “self-interested” or “excessively self-interested.” Since only excessively self-interested actions are prohibited, the prohibition on desire cannot be a prohibition on all self-interested desires. But the prohibition on desire cannot be a prohibition on excessively self-interested desires either, because this class of desires is too insignificant to explain the general (...)
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  14. Christopher G. Framarin (2007). Good and Bad Desires: Implications of the Dialogue Between Kṛṣṇa and Arjuna. [REVIEW] International Journal of Hindu Studies 11 (2):147-170.
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  15. Christopher G. Framarin (2006). Motivation in the Manusm R\D{R}Ti. Journal of Indian Philosophy 34 (5):397-413.
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  16. Christopher G. Framarin (2006). Motivation in the Manusm Ti. Journal of Indian Philosophy 34 (5):397-413.
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  17. Christopher G. Framarin (2006). The Desire You Are Required to Get Rid Of: A Functionalist Analysis of Desire in the Bhagavadgita. Philosophy East and West 56 (4):604-+.
    : Nisk?makarma is generally understood nonliterally as action done without desire of a certain sort. It is argued here that all desires are prohibited by nisk?makarma. Two objections are considered: (1) desire is a necessary condition of action, and (2) the Indian tradition as a whole accepts desire as a necessary condition of action. A distinction is drawn here between a goal and a desire, and it is argued that goals.
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  18. Christopher G. Framarin (2005). Taking Desirelessness () Seriously. Asian Philosophy 15 (2):143 – 155.
    There is a principle of charity within the Indian philosophical tradition that states that one is justified in reverting to a non-literal interpretation of a text only when a literal reading entails a clear contradiction. Most scholars have argued that a literal interpretation of the Bhagavadgtā's advice to act without desire ought to be abandoned for this reason, because it contradicts the obvious fact that desire is a necessary condition of action. In this paper two often cited arguments for the (...)
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