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  1. Christopher Gilbert (2013). Descartes, Passion, and the Ability to Do Otherwise. Journal of Philosophical Research 38:275-298.
    What does Descartes regard as necessary for human freedom? I approach this topic from a distinctive angle by focusing on the role of the passions in Descartes’s account of free will. My goal is to show that (1) Descartes takes us to have the ability to do otherwise when we judge or choose under the influence of the passions, and that (2) while such ability does not constitute freedom in the fullest Cartesian sense, it does ensure that the judgments and (...)
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  2. Christopher Gilbert (2013). The God Debates: A 21st Century Guide for Atheists and Believers (and Everyone in Between), by John R. Shook. Teaching Philosophy 36 (3):296-300.
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  3. Christopher J. Gilbert (2013). Toward the Satyric. Philosophy and Rhetoric 46 (3):280-305.
    Theorists have long sought to repress or domesticate the shaggy, obscene, and transgressive satyr that ranges through satire’s long history, lurking in dark corners, and to make it into a model of a moral citizen.Unruly, wayward, frolicsome, critical, parasitic, at times perverse, malicious, cynical, scornful, unstable—it is at once pervasive yet recalcitrant, basic yet impenetrable. Satire is the stranger that lives in the basement.Instead of trying to resolve all the problems that arise from the particular of a given tragic dignification, (...)
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  4. Christopher Gilbert (2006). Epistemology After Protagoras. Review of Metaphysics 59 (4):891-892.
  5. Christopher Gilbert (2005). Catholic Cartesian Dualism. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 79 (2):233-249.
    Alfred Freddoso has argued that Cartesian dualism cannot serve as the model for a philosophical anthropology that will be consistent with the plain sense of Church teachings. I disagree. Although the interpretation of Cartesian dualism to which Freddoso objects is not unwarranted by the Cartesian texts, a close reading of those texts suggests a diff erent interpretation. I shall defend a reading of Cartesian dualism that departs from the one which Freddoso discusses. I shall then demonstrate that this alternative reading (...)
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  6. Christopher Gilbert (2005). Grades of Freedom: Augustine and Descartes. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 86 (2):201–224.
  7. Christopher Gilbert (1998). Freedom and Enslavement: Descartes on Passions and the Will. History of Philosophy Quarterly 15 (2):177 - 190.
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  8. Christopher Gilbert (1998). The Role of Thoughts in Wittgenstein's Tractatus. Linguistics and Philosophy 21 (4):341-352.