Search results for 'Christopher I. Lehrich' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Christopher I. Lehrich (2008). Finding One's Place: Magic, Science, Religion, and Interdisciplinarity. In Jonathan Z. Smith, Willi Braun & Russell T. McCutcheon (eds.), Introducing Religion: Essays in Honor of Jonathan Z. Smith. Equinox Pub. 252.
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  2.  17
    Christopher I. Lehrich (2003). The Language of Demons and Angels: Cornelius Agrippa's Occult Philosophy. Brill.
    This is the first modern study of Agrippa's occult philosophy as a coherent part of his intellectual work.
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  3.  4
    Charles Burnett (2015). Christopher I. Beckwith, Warriors of the Cloisters: The Central Asian Origins of Science in the Medieval World. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2012. Pp. Xvi, 211. $29.95. ISBN: 978-0-691-15531-9. [REVIEW] Speculum 90 (3):771-774.
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  4. Ethan Mills (2015). Christopher I. Beckwith.Warriors of the Cloisters: The Central Asian Origins of Science in the Medieval World. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 2012. Pp. Xvii+211. $29.95. [REVIEW] Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science 5 (1):201-204.
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    Pamela M. Huby (1973). Books Γ, Δ, and E of the Metaphysics Aristotle: Metaphysics, Books Γ, Δ, E. Translated with Notes by Christopher Kirwan. Pp. Viii+206. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1971. Cloth, £2.25 (Paper, £I.10). [REVIEW] The Classical Review 23 (02):147-149.
  6.  8
    Paul Brazier (2008). I Am the Lord Your God: Christian Reflections on the ten Commandments. Edited by Carl E. Braaten and Christopher R. Seitzreading the Sermon on the Mount: Character Formation and Decision Making in Matthew 5–7. By Charles H. Talbert. [REVIEW] Heythrop Journal 49 (3):485–486.
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  7.  2
    E. N. J. Peters (1983). Political and Legal Studies: Volume I, Politeia, and Volume II, Studies in American Constitutional Law. By Joseph F. Costanzo S.J. West Hanover, Massachusetts. The Christopher Publishing House; 1982. [REVIEW] American Journal of Jurisprudence 28 (1):240-248.
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  8.  2
    James M. Dean (2001). TL Burton, Ed., With Frank Schaer, Bernadette Masters, Sabina Flanagan, Robin Eaden, and Christopher Bright, Sidrak and Bokkus, 1: Introduction, Prologue, and Books I-II; 2: Books III-IV, Commentary, Appendices, Glossary, Index. A Paralleltext Edition From Bodleian Library, MS Laud Misc. 559 and British Library, MS Lansdowne 793.(Early English Text Society, OS, 311–12.) Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press, 1998–1999. 1: Pp. Xcv, 1–443 Plus 2 Black-and-White Plates; Tables. 2: Pp. Vii, 444–941 ... [REVIEW] Speculum 76 (4):1011-1012.
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  9. Pierre Manent (2012). Machine Generated Contents Note: Introduction / Eve Grace and Christopher Kelly; Part I. Politics and Economics: 1. Rousseau and the Illustrious Montesquieu / Christopher Kelly; 2. Political Economy and Individual Liberty / Ryan Patrick Hanley; Part II. Science and Epistemology: 3. The Presence of Sciences in Rousseau's Trajectory and Works / Bruno Bernardi and Bernadette Bensaud-Vincent; 4. Epistemology and Political Perception in the Case of Rousseau / Terence Marshall; Part III. The Modern or Classical, Theological or Philosophical, Foundations of Rousseau's System: 5. On the Intention of Rousseau / Leo Strauss; 6. On Strauss on Rousseau / Victor Gourevitch; 7. Built on Sand: Moral Law in Rousseau's Second Discourse / Victor Gourevitch; 8. Rousseau and Pascal / Matthew W. Maguire; Part IV. Rousseau as Educator and Legislator: 9. The Measure of the Possible: Imagination in Rousseau's Philosophical Pedagogy / Richard Velkley; 10. Rousseau's French Revolution / Pamela K. Jensen; 11. Ro. [REVIEW] In Eve Grace & Christopher Kelly (eds.), The Challenge of Rousseau. Cambridge University Press
     
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  10. Adam Schwartz (1998). "I Thought the Church and I Wanted the Same Thing": Opposition to Twentieth-Century Liturgical Change in the Thought of Graham Greene, Christopher Dawson, and David Jones. Logos 1 (4).
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  11.  3
    Allister Neher (2009). Christopher Wren, Thomas Willis and the Depiction of the Brain and Nerves. Journal of Medical Humanities 30 (3):191-200.
    This paper is about Christopher Wren’s engravings for Thomas Willis’ The Anatomy of the Brain and Nerves of 1664. It is a study in the intersection of medicine and art in 17th century Britain. Willis, an eminent English physician and anatomist, was a major figure in the development of modern neurology, and The Anatomy of the Brain and Nerves was his most famous and influential book. Wren was Willis’ assistant and medical artist. I discuss the visual strategies employed by (...)
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  12. Catherine Rowett (2013). Christopher Stead. Studia Patristica 53 (1):17-30.
    Professor Christopher Stead was Ely Professor of Divinity from 1971 until his retirement in 1980 and one of the great contributors to the Oxford Patristic Conferences for many years. In this paper I reflect on his work in Patristics, and I attempt to understand how his interests diverged from the other major contributors in the same period, and how they were formed by his philosophical milieu and the spirit of the age. As a case study to illustrate and diagnose (...)
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  13.  39
    Sebastian Watzl (2011). Review of Christopher Mole 'Attention is Cognitive Unison: An Essay in Philosophical Psychology'. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews.
    A relatively detailed review (~ 4000 words) of Christopher Mole's (2010) book "Attention is Cognitive Unison". I suggest that Mole makes a good case against many types of reductivist accounts of attention, using the right kind of methodology. Yet, I argue that his adverbialist theory is not the best articulation of the crucial anti-reductivist insight. The distinction between adverbial and process-first phenomena he draws remains unclear, anti-reductivist process theories can escapte his arguments, and finally I provide an argument for (...)
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  14.  21
    Gary James Jason (2011). Does Virtue Epistemology Provide a Better Account of the Ad Hominem Argument? A Reply to Christopher Johnson. Philosophy 86 (1):95-119.
    Christopher Johnson has put forward in this journal the view that ad hominem reasoning may be more generally reasonable than is allowed by writers such as myself, basing his view on virtue epistemology. I review his account, as well as the standard account, of ad hominem reasoning, and show how the standard account would handle the cases he sketches in defense of his own view. I then give four criticisms of his view generally: the problems of virtue conflict, vagueness, (...)
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  15. Deirdre Golash (2006). Marriage, Autonomy, and the State: Reply to Christopher Bennett. Res Publica 12 (2):179-190.
    Christopher Bennett has argued that state support of conjugal relationships can be founded on the unique contribution such relationships make to the autonomy of their participants by providing them with various forms of recognition and support unavailable elsewhere. I argue that, in part because a long history of interaction between two people who need each other’s validation tends to produce less meaningful responses over time, long-term conjugal relationships are unlikely to provide autonomy-enhancing support to their participants. To the extent (...)
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  16.  73
    Harvey Siegel (2008). Autonomy, Critical Thinking and the Wittgensteinian Legacy: Reflections on Christopher Winch, Education, Autonomy and Critical Thinking. Journal of Philosophy of Education 42 (1):165-184.
    In this review of Christopher Winch's new book, Education, Autonomy and Critical Thinking (2006), I discuss its main theses, supporting some and criticising others. In particular, I take issue with several of Winch's claims and arguments concerning critical thinking and rationality, and deplore his reliance on what I suggest are problematic strains of the later Wittgenstein. But these criticisms are not such as to upend Winch's powerful critique of antiperfectionism and 'strong autonomy' or his defence of 'weak autonomy'. His (...)
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  17.  20
    Joydeep Bagchee (2011). A Response to Christopher Framarin. Philosophy East and West 61 (4):720-722.
    I thank Christopher Framarin for his response and would like to address three points he raises in this brief rejoinder.Framarin's book is a self-standing analysis of the central argument of the Gītā, and the reader should take my comments about his papers as additional material in support of the book. In drawing attention to them, my aim was to stress Framarin's long engagement with the subject.Although Framarin's book deals quite extensively with other texts from the Indian tradition, the Gītā (...)
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  18.  46
    Patrick Toner (2007). Thomas Versus Tibbles: A Critical Study of Christopher Brown's Aquinas and the Ship of Theseus. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 81 (4):639-653.
    In his recent book, Aquinas and the Ship of Theseus, Christopher Brown has argued that the metaphysics of St. Thomas is preferable to contemporary analyticviews because it can solve the “problem of material constitution” (PMC) without requiring us to relinquish any of the common-sense beliefs that generate that problem. In this critical study, I show that in the case of both substances and aggregates, Brown’s Aquinas endorses views that are extremely implausible. Consequently, even if it is granted that the (...)
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  19.  24
    Alexander Nehamas (2014). Nietzsche, Drives, Selves, and Leonard Bernstein: A Reply to Christopher Janaway and Robert Pippin. Journal of Nietzsche Studies 45 (2):134-146.
    Ours is a discipline in which agreement is often a form of discourtesy, and so I must thank Christopher Janaway and Robert Pippin for doing me the courtesy of disagreeing with several issues in my book, most of which I will not be able to discuss here. Both are kind and generous friends, which is why they both begin by saying some very nice things about Nietzsche: Life as Literature.1 Or are they? Yes, they are, but that is not (...)
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  20.  34
    Wayne A. Davis (2005). Concepts and Epistemic Individuation (Christopher Peacocke). Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 70 (2):290-325.
    Christopher Peacocke has presented an original version of the perennial philosophical thesis that we can gain substantive metaphysical and epistemological insight from an analysis of our concepts. Peacocke's innovation is to look at how concepts are individuated by their possession conditions, which he believes can be specified in terms of conditions in which certain propositions containing those concepts are accepted. The ability to provide such insight is one of Peacocke's major arguments for his theory of concepts. I will critically (...)
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  21.  2
    Tad Bratkowski (2015). The Aesthetics and Ethics of Faith: A Dialogue Between Liberationist and Pragmatic Thought by Christopher D. Tirres. Education and Culture 31 (2):119-121.
    From the title and subtitle of Christopher D. Tirres’s book, we already ascertain that the work addresses four discrete philosophic disciplines or traditions: American pragmatism, Latin American liberation, aesthetics, and ethics. And at first glance, each of the four does not evoke an immediate connection to the other three, but Tirres is capable of putting them into a genuine conversation. Tirres’s book is organized into eight chapters, with the first and eighth serving respectively as a succinct introduction and conclusion. (...)
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  22.  6
    Rachel Loewen Walker (2011). Toward a FIERCE Nomadology: Contesting Queer Geographies on the Christopher Street Pier. Phaenex 6 (1):90-120.
    New York City has a long history of gentrification, well demonstrated by the strategies of “revitalization” and “re-development” that have occurred in Harlem throughout the last century. Less well known is the historical, political, and social context surrounding New York’s Pier 45, also known as the Christopher Street Pier. As a historically-known gathering spot for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender individuals, the Christopher Street Pier gained recognition for harbouring what could be described as a queer public . However, (...)
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  23.  3
    Elvio Baccarini (2011). Utilitarizam, unutarnja perspektiva i pitanje samoubojstva. Filozofska Istrazivanja 31 (2):263-275.
    U recentnoj knjizi Christopher Cowley je problematizirao shvaćanje racionalnosti koje se nalazi u utilitarističkoj raspravi o samoubojstvu, kao i općenito shvaćanje racionalnosti koje se usmjerava ustanovljavanju vanjskih razloga. Suprotno tome, Cowley zastupa unutarnju perspektivu kao jedinu vjerodostojnu u takvim odlukama. Izravno ću razmotriti njegovu kritiku Richarda Brandta i Davida Humea. Intencija je teksta nuđenje preciznije interpretacije Humea te usporediti argumente za i protiv unutarnjih i vanjskih razloga. Zaključak je uvjetovano prihvaćanje perspektive unutarnjih razloga.In a recent book, Christopher Cowley (...)
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  24.  5
    Thomas May (1999). Response to “Advance Directives and Voluntary Slavery” by Christopher Tollefsen. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 8 (3):358-363.
    In an interesting response to an article I published in CQ that questions the ability of advance directives to reflect autonomy, Christopher Tollefsen raises a number of issues that deserve greater attention. Tollefsen offers several examples to illustrate how the critique of advance directives I offer would also threaten other choices that most people would consider autonomous. Importantly, I largely agree that the examples Tollefsen offers should be captured as autonomous. Where I disagree, however, is whether these examples reflect (...)
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  25.  1
    Thomas Bender (2012). The Historian as Public Moralist: The Case of Christopher Lasch. Modern Intellectual History 9 (3):733-744.
    When I entered graduate school in the fall of 1966, planning to study American intellectual history and perhaps intellectuals specifically, all the talk among the more advanced graduate students was a recently published book, The New Radicalism in America , 1889–1963: The Intellectual as a Social Type , by Christopher Lasch. I read it eagerly, but I was not sure what to make of it. The author, Christopher Lasch, offered a very complex analysis of intellectuals’ lives and their (...)
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  26. Jay Allison, Dan Gediman, John Gregory & Viki Merrick (eds.) (2006). This I Believe: The Personal Philosophies of Remarkable Men and Women. H. Holt.
    An inspiring collection of the personal philosophies of a fascinating group of individuals Based on the NPR series of the same name, This I Believe features eighty essays penned by the famous and the unknown—completing the thought that the book’s title begins. Each piece compels readers to rethink not only how they have arrived at their own personal beliefs but also the extent to which they share them with others. Featuring a star-studded list of contributors—including Isabel Allende, John Updike, William (...)
     
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  27. Thomas May (1999). Response to “Advance Directives and Voluntary Slavery” by Christopher Tollefsen - Slavery, Commitment, and Choice: Do Advance Directives Reflect Autonomy? Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 8 (3):358-363.
    In an interesting response to an article I published in CQ that questions the ability of advance directives to reflect autonomy, Christopher Tollefsen raises a number of issues that deserve greater attention. Tollefsen offers several examples to illustrate how the critique of advance directives I offer would also threaten other choices that most people would consider autonomous. Importantly, I largely agree that the examples Tollefsen offers should be captured as autonomous. Where I disagree, however, is whether these examples reflect (...)
     
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  28. Christopher Peacocke (2005). 'Another I': Representing Conscious States, Perception, and Others. In Jose Luis Bermudez & José Luis Bermúdez (eds.), Thought, Reference, and Experience: Themes From the Philosophy of Gareth Evans. Oxford: Clarendon Press
    What is it for a thinker to possess the concept of perceptual experience? What is it to be able to think of seeings, hearings and touchings, and to be able to think of experiences that are subjectively like seeings, hearings and touchings?
     
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  29.  50
    Christopher Hitchcock (forthcoming). Conditioning, Intervening, and Decision. Synthese (4):1-20.
    Clark Glymour, together with his students Peter Spirtes and Richard Scheines, did pioneering work on graphical causal models . One of the central advances provided by these models is the ability to simply represent the effects of interventions. In an elegant paper , Glymour and his student Christopher Meek applied these methods to problems in decision theory. One of the morals they drew was that causal decision theory should be understood in terms of interventions. I revisit their proposal, and (...)
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  30. Christopher Grau (2011). There is No 'I' in 'Robot': Robots and Utilitarianism (Expanded & Revised). In Susan Anderson & Michael Anderson (eds.), Machine Ethics. Cambridge University Press 451.
    Utilizing the film I, Robot as a springboard, I here consider the feasibility of robot utilitarians, the moral responsibilities that come with the creation of ethical robots, and the possibility of distinct ethics for robot-robot interaction as opposed to robot-human interaction. (This is a revised and expanded version of an essay that originally appeared in IEEE: Intelligent Systems.).
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  31.  1
    Carlo I. Accetti (forthcoming). Between Reason and Will: On Christopher Meckstroth’s The Struggle for Democracy. European Journal of Political Theory:1474885116652827.
    Christopher Meckstroth’s book The Struggle for Democracy poses and attempts to solve a central problem of democratic theory: what he calls the ‘paradox of authorization’, whereby the very activity of spelling out the political content of democracy is said to potentially contradict its object, since the democratic theorist may end up substituting himself or herself for ‘the people’ in deciding what this form government amounts to in practice. In order to avoid this problem, Meckstroth suggests that the political content (...)
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  32. Christopher Pincock, I.
    Most contemporary philosophy of mathematics focuses on a small segment of mathematics, mainly the natural numbers and foundational disciplines like set theory. While there are good reasons for this approach, in this paper I will examine the philosophical problems associated with the area of mathematics known as applied mathematics.
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  33.  11
    Francesca Bordogna, Massimo Ferrari & Christopher Hookway (2009). I pragmatisti italiani a cura di Giovanni Maddalena e Giovanni Tuzet. Iride 22 (1):237-252.
    Comments on G. Maddalena and G. Tuzet, editors, I Pragmatisti Italiani. Tra Alleati e Nemeci (Italian Pragmatists. Between Enemies and Allies). Milano: Albo Versorio, 2007.
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  34. Christopher Pincock, Comments on Scott Soames, Philosophical Analysis in the Twentieth Century, Volume I.
    Scott Soames has given us a clear, engaging but ultimately unsatisfying introduction to the history of analytic philosophy. Based on Soames’ impressive work in the philosophy of language, when these two volumes appeared I had high hopes that he would be successful. There is certainly a need for an introductory survey of the history of analytic philosophy. Currently, there is no resource for the beginning student or the amateur historian that will summarize our current understanding of the origins and development (...)
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  35.  1
    Christopher Cherry (1991). Machines as Persons?: Christopher Cherry. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 29:11-24.
    I begin, as I shall end, with fictions. In a well-known tale, The Sandman , Hoffmann has a student, Nathaniel, fall in love with a beautiful doll, Olympia, whom he has spied upon as she sits at a window across the street from his lodgings. We are meant to suppose that Nathaniel mistakes an automaton for a human being . The mistake is the result of an elaborate but obscure deception on the part of the doll's designer, Professor Spalanzani. Nathaniel (...)
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  36.  1
    Christopher Rowland (2012). I Have Writ, I Have Acted, I Have Peace. In Zoë Bennett & David B. Gowler (eds.), Radical Christian Voices and Practice: Essays in Honour of Christopher Rowland. OUP Oxford 257.
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  37. Christopher G. Framarin (2008). Motivation in the Nyāyasūtra and Brahmasiddhi: CHRISTOPHER G. FRAMARIN. Religious Studies 44 (1):43-61.
    One common interpretation of the orthodox Indian prohibition on desire is that it is a prohibition on phenomenologically salient desires. The Nyāyasūtra and Brahmasiddhi seem to support this view. I argue that this interpretation is mistaken. The Vedāntins draw a distinction between counting some fact as a reason for acting and counting one's desire as a reason for acting, and prohibit the latter. The Naiyāyikas draw a distinction between desiring to avoid some state of affairs and believing that some state (...)
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  38. James Woodward & Christopher Hitchcock (2003). Explanatory Generalizations, Part I: A Counterfactual Account. Noûs 37 (1):1–24.
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  39.  95
    Olle Blomberg (2016). Shared Intention and the Doxastic Single End Condition. Philosophical Studies 173 (2):351-372.
    What is required for several agents to intentionally \ together? I argue that each of them must believe or assume that their \-ing is a single end that each intends to contribute to. Various analogies between intentional singular action and intentional joint action show that this doxastic single end condition captures a feature at the very heart of the phenomenon of intentional joint action. For instance, just as several simple actions are only unified into a complex intentional singular activity if (...)
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  40. David Wallace & Christopher Gordon Timpson (2010). Quantum Mechanics on Spacetime I: Spacetime State Realism. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 61 (4):697-727.
    What ontology does realism about the quantum state suggest? The main extant view in contemporary philosophy of physics is wave-function realism . We elaborate the sense in which wave-function realism does provide an ontological picture, and defend it from certain objections that have been raised against it. However, there are good reasons to be dissatisfied with wave-function realism, as we go on to elaborate. This motivates the development of an opposing picture: what we call spacetime state realism , a view (...)
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  41.  22
    Richard P. Hamilton (2010). The Concept of Health: Beyond Normativism and Naturalism. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 16 (2):323-329.
    Philosophical discussions of health and disease have traditionally been dominated by a debate between normativists, who hold that health is an inescapably value-laded concept and naturalists, such as Christopher Boorse, who believe that it is possible to derive a purely descriptive or theoretical definition of health based upon biological function. In this paper I defend a distinctive view which traces its origins in Aristotle's naturalistic ethics. An Arisotelian would agree with Boorse that health and disease are ubiquitous features of (...)
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  42. Björn Petersson (2007). Collectivity and Circularity. Journal of Philosophy 104 (3):138-156.
    According to a common claim, a necessary condition for a collective action (as opposed to a mere set of intertwined or parallel actions) to take place is that the notion of collective action figures in the content of each participant’s attitudes. Insofar as this claim is part of a conceptual analysis, it gives rise to a circularity challenge that has been explicitly addressed by Michael Bratman and Christopher Kutz.1 I will briefly show how the problem arises within Bratman’s and (...)
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  43. Christopher J. G. Meacham (2010). Contemporary Approaches to Statistical Mechanical Probabilities: A Critical Commentary - Part I: The Indifference Approach. Philosophy Compass 5 (12):1116-1126.
    This pair of articles provides a critical commentary on contemporary approaches to statistical mechanical probabilities. These articles focus on the two ways of understanding these probabilities that have received the most attention in the recent literature: the epistemic indifference approach, and the Lewis-style regularity approach. These articles describe these approaches, highlight the main points of contention, and make some attempts to advance the discussion. The first of these articles provides a brief sketch of statistical mechanics, and discusses the indifference approach (...)
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  44.  5
    Peter Chau (forthcoming). Bennett’s Expressive Justification of Punishment. Criminal Law and Philosophy:1-19.
    In this paper, I will critically assess the expressive justification of punishment recently offered by Christopher Bennett in The Apology Ritual and a number of papers. I will first draw a distinction between three conceptions of expression: communicative, motivational, and symbolic. After briefly demonstrating the difficulties of using the first two conceptions of expression to ground punishment and showing that Bennett does not ultimately rely on those two conceptions, I argue that Bennett’s account does not succeed because he fails (...)
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  45. Andrew Johnson (2013). An Apology for the “New Atheism”. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 73 (1):5-28.
    In recent years, a series of bestselling atheist manifestos by Sam Harris, Richard Dawkins, and Christopher Hitchens has thrust the topic of the rationality of religion into the public discourse. Christian moderates of an intellectual bent and even some agnostics and atheists have taken umbrage and lashed back. In this paper I defend the New Atheists against three common charges: that their critiques of religion commit basic logical fallacies (such as straw man, false dichotomy, or hasty generalization), that their (...)
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  46.  86
    Uwe Steinhoff, Finlay on Legitimate Authority: A Critical Comment.
    Christopher J. Finlay claims “that a principle of moral or legitimate authority is necessary in just war theory for evaluating properly the justifiability of violence by non-state entities when they claim to act on behalf of the victims of rights violations and political injustice.” In particular, he argues that states, unlike non-state actors, possess what he calls “Lesser Moral Authority.” This authority allegedly enables states to invoke “the War Convention,” which in turn entitles even individual soldiers on the aggressive (...)
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  47.  37
    Christopher Grau (2006). There is No ‘I’ in ‘Robot’: Robots & Utilitarianism. IEEE Intelligent Systems 21 (4):52-55.
  48.  43
    John Campbell (2012). Cogito Ergo Sum: Christopher Peacocke and John Campbell: II—Lichtenberg and the Cogito. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 112 (3):361-378.
    Our use of ‘I’, or something like it, is implicated in our self-regarding emotions, in the concern to survive, and so seems basic to ordinary human life. But why does that pattern of use require a referring term? Don't Lichtenberg's formulations show how we could have our ordinary pattern of use here without the first person? I argue that what explains our compulsion to regard the first person as a referring term is our ordinary causal thinking, which requires us to (...)
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  49. Mark Schroeder (2014). Does Expressivism Have Subjectivist Consequences? Philosophical Perspectives 28 (1):278-290.
    Metaethical expressivists claim that we can explain what moral words like ‘wrong’ mean without having to know what they are about – but rather by saying what it is to think that something is wrong – namely, to disapprove of it. Given the close connection between expressivists’ theory of the meaning of moral words and our attitudes of approval and disapproval, expressivists have had a hard time shaking the intuitive charge that theirs is an objectionably subjectivist or mind-dependent view of (...)
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  50.  62
    Martin F. Fricke (2009). Evans and First Person Authority. Abstracta 5 (1):3-15.
    In The Varieties of Reference, Gareth Evans describes the acquisition of beliefs about one’s beliefs in the following way: ‘I get myself in a position to answer the question whether I believe that p by putting into operation whatever procedure I have for answering the question whether p.’ In this paper I argue that Evans’s remark can be used to explain first person authority if it is supplemented with the following consideration: Holding on to the content of a belief and (...)
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