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  1. Christopher J. Eberle (2013). Audi , Robert . Democratic Authority and the Separation of Church and State .Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2011. Pp. 192. $39.95 (Cloth). [REVIEW] Ethics 123 (4):745-750.
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  2. Christopher J. Eberle (2013). Comments on Carnahan, Anderson, and Wolterstorff. Philosophia 41 (2):437-445.
    In this paper, I reflect on a number of issues raised in Kevin Carnahan’s “Religion, and not just Religious Reasons, in the Public Square: A Consideration of Robert Audi’s and Nicholas Wolterstorff’s Religion in the Public Square” and Eric A. Anderson’s “Religiously Conservative Citizens and the Ideal of Conscientious Engagement: A Comment on Wolterstorff and Eberle.” In response to Carnahan, I argue that recent discussions of the proper public role of religious reason do not depend on an objectionable conception of (...)
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  3. Christopher J. Eberle (2013). Just War and Cyberwar. Journal of Military Ethics 12 (1):54-67.
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  4. Christopher J. Eberle (2012). Shari'a Reasoning and the Justice of Religious War. Philosophia 40 (2):195-211.
    Most contemporary advocates of the Just War Tradition (JWT) condemn religious war. If they are correct, waging war should be a secular affair, fully justifiable on non-religious grounds. This secularized understanding of the JWT draws on normative commitments that lead many political theorists to advocate in favor of a secularized politics in western liberal polities. As a matter of historical fact and contemporary commitment, many Muslims have rejected the secularized conception of the morality of war found in contemporary conceptions of (...)
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  5. Christopher J. Eberle & Rick Rubel (2012). Religious Conviction in the Profession of Arms. Journal of Military Ethics 11 (3):171-185.
    Abstract Many political theorists have argued that religious reasons should play a rather limited role in public or political settings. So, for example, according to the Doctrine of Religious Restraint, citizens and legislators ought not allow religious reasons to play a decisive role in justifying public policies. Many military professionals seem to believe that some version of that doctrine applies in military settings, that is, that military professionals should not allow their religious convictions to determine how they exercise command authority. (...)
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  6. Christopher J. Eberle (2009). Basic Human Worth : Religious and Secular Perspectives. In Yujin Nagasawa & Erik J. Wielenberg (eds.), New Waves in Philosophy of Religion. Palgrave Macmillan. 167.
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  7. Christopher J. Eberle (2007). A. C. Grayling, Among the Dead Cities: The History and Moral Legacy of the WWII Bombing of Civilians in Germany and Japan:Among the Dead Cities: The History and Moral Legacy of the WWII Bombing of Civilians in Germany and Japan. Ethics 117 (2):356-363.
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  8. Christopher J. Eberle (2007). God, War, and Conscience. Journal of Religious Ethics 35 (3):479 - 507.
    Many military officers believe that they morally ought to obey legal orders to fight even in unjust wars: they have a moral obligation to exercise indiscriminate obedience to legal orders to fight. I argue that officers should not be required to exercise indiscriminate obedience: certain theistic commitments to which many citizens and officers adhere prohibit indiscriminate obedience to legal orders to fight. This theistic argument constitutes adequate reason not to require officers to exercise indiscriminate obedience. However, this raises a further (...)
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  9. Christopher J. Eberle (2006). Lucas Swaine, The Liberal Conscience: Politics and Principle in a World of Religious Pluralism:The Liberal Conscience: Politics and Principle in a World of Religious Pluralism. Ethics 116 (4):813-819.
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  10. Christopher J. Eberle (2006). Paul Weithman, Religion and the Obligations of Citizenship:Religion and the Obligations of Citizenship. Ethics 116 (3):611-614.
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  11. Christopher J. Eberle (2006). Religion, Pacifism, and the Doctrine of Restraint. Journal of Religious Ethics 34 (2):203 - 224.
    The doctrine of restraint is the claim that citizens and legislators ought to restrain themselves from making political decisions solely on religious grounds. That doctrine is normally construed as a general constraint on religious arguments: an exclusively religious rationale "as such" is an inappropriate basis for a political decision, particularly a coercive political decision. However, the most common arguments for the doctrine of restraint fail to show that citizens and legislators ought to obey the doctrine of restraint, as we can (...)
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  12. Christopher J. Eberle (2002). Religion and Liberal Democracy. In Robert L. Simon (ed.), The Blackwell Guide to Social and Political Philosophy. Blackwell.
     
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  13. Christopher J. Eberle (1999). Why Restraint is Religiously Unacceptable. Religious Studies 35 (3):247-276.
    I begin this essay by articulating an argument in support of the claim that theistic citizens ought not to support coercive policies for which they lack an adequate secular rationale. That argument employs various claims regarding God's nature to show: (i) that theistic citizens should expect to discern secular corroboration for each religiously grounded moral truth to which they adhere; and (ii) theistic citizens should doubt any religiously grounded moral claim for which they cannot discern an adequate secular rationale. I (...)
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  14. Christopher J. Eberle (1998). The Autonomy and Explanation of Mystical Perception. Religious Studies 34 (3):299-316.
    William Alston has articulated a powerful defence of the claim that mystical perception generates prima facie justified beliefs about God. At the heart of his defence is the claim that mystical perception is 'innocent until proven guilty'; that is, Alston claims that the practice of forming beliefs on the basis of putative perceptions of God should be accorded the same presumptive innocence we accord to other standard ways of forming beliefs like sense perception, memory and introspection. But Alston employs a (...)
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