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  1. Christopher J. Insole (2009). The Realist Hope: A Critique of Anti-Realist Approaches in Contemporary Philosophical Theology. Ars Disputandi 9:1566-5399.
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  2. Christopher J. Insole (2006). “Beyond Glass Doors . . . The Sun No Longer Shining”: English Platonism and the Problem of Self‐Love in the Literary and Philosophical Work of Iris Murdoch1. [REVIEW] Modern Theology 22 (1):111-143.
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  3. Christopher J. Insole (2005). James K. A. Smith Speech and Theology: Language and the Logic of Incarnation. (London and New York: Routledge, 2002). Pp. VIII+200. $109.95, £63.00 (Hbk); $34.95, £19.99 (Pbk). ISBN 0 415 276950 (Hbk); 0 415 276969 (Pbk). [REVIEW] Religious Studies 41 (2):233-237.
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  4. Christopher J. Insole (2004). Against Radical Orthodoxy: The Dangers of Overcoming Political Liberalism. Modern Theology 20 (2):213-241.
  5. Christopher J. Insole (2004). The Worship of Freedom: Negative and Positive Notions of Liberty in Philosophy of Religion and Political Philosophy. Heythrop Journal 45 (2):209–226.
  6. Christopher J. Insole (2002). Why Anti-Realism Breaks Up Relationships. Heythrop Journal 43 (1):20–33.
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  7. Christopher J. Insole (2000). Gordon Kaufman and the Kantian Mystery. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 47 (2):101-119.
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  8. Christopher J. Insole (2000). Seeing Off the Local Threat to Irreducible Knowledge by Testimony. Philosophical Quarterly 50 (198):44-56.
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  9. Christopher J. Insole (2000). Why John Hick Cannot, and Should Not, Stay Out of the Jam Pot. Religious Studies 36 (1):25-33.
    John Hick uses a distinction between the formal and the substantial properties of the Real an sich, the noumenal God. Hick claims that substantial properties, such as 'being good' or 'being personal', cannot be ascribed to the Real an sich. On the other hand, according to Hick, formal properties -- such as 'being such that none of our concepts apply' -- can be predicated of the Real an sich. I argue, first of all, that many of the properties Hick ascribes (...)
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