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  1. Christopher J. Preston (forthcoming). Moral Turbulence and Geoengineering: A Lingering Hazard From the Perfect Moral Storm. Philosophy and Public Issues - Filosofia E Questioni Pubbliche.
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  2. Holly Jean Buck, Andrea R. Gammon & Christopher J. Preston (2014). Gender and Geoengineering. Hypatia 29 (3):651-669.
    Geoengineering has been broadly and helpfully defined as “the intentional manipulation of the earth's climate to counteract anthropogenic climate change or its warming effects” (Corner and Pidgeon , 26). Although there exists a rapidly growing literature on the ethics of geoengineering, very little has been written about its gender dimensions. The authors consider four contexts in which geoengineering appears to have important gender dimensions: (1) the demographics of those pushing the current agenda, (2) the overall vision of control it involves, (...)
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  3. Christopher J. Preston (2012). Beyond the End of Nature: SRM and Two Tales of Artificity for the Anthropocene. Ethics, Policy and Environment 15 (2):188 - 201.
    Ethics, Policy & Environment, Volume 15, Issue 2, Page 188-201, June 2012.
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  4. Christopher J. Preston (2011). Re-Thinking the Unthinkable: Environmental Ethics and the Presumptive Argument Against Geoengineering. Environmental Values 20 (4):457 - 479.
    The rapid rise in interest in geoengineering the climate as a response to global warming presents a clear and significant challenge to environmental ethics. The paper articulates what I call the 'presumptive argument' against geoengineering from environmental ethics, a presumption strong enough to make geoengineering almost 'unthinkable' from within that tradition. Two rationales for suspending that presumption are next considered. One of them is a 'lesser evil' argument, the other makes connections between the presumptive argument, ecofacism, and the anthropocentrism/non-anthropocentrism debate. (...)
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  5. Christopher J. Preston (2009). Moral Knowledge: Real and Grounded in Place. Ethics, Place and Environment 12 (2):175 – 186.
    Recent work in ethics and epistemology argues that physical surroundings have normative force. The ideas of 'grounding knowledge' and 'real ethics' provide an important way to understand sense of place. This paper uses this work to argue that there is a moral structure to material culture, and that the existence of this moral structure makes it necessary for us to pay attention to the epistemic import of the physical environments we create and live in. Since environments are thick with moral (...)
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  6. Christopher J. Preston (2008). Synthetic Biology: Drawing a Line in Darwin's Sand. Environmental Values 17 (1):23 - 39.
    Maintaining the coherence of the distinction between nature and artefact has long been central to environmental thinking. By building genomes from scratch out of 'bio-bricks', synthetic biology promises to create biotic artefacts markedly different from anything created thus far in biotechnology. These new biotic artefacts depart from a core principle of Darwinian natural selection – descent through modification – leaving them with no causal connection to historical evolutionary processes. This departure from the core principle of Darwinism presents a challenge to (...)
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  7. Christopher J. Preston (2007). Wayne Ouderkirkand Christopher J. Preston. In Christopher J. Preston and Wayne Ouderkirk (ed.), Nature, Value, Duty: Life on Earth with Holmes Rolston, Iii. Springer. 8.
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  8. Christopher J. Preston (2005). Epistemology and Environmental Philosophy: The Epistemic Significance of Place. Ethics and the Environment 10 (2):1-4.
  9. Christopher J. Preston (2005). Pluralism and Naturalism: Why the Proliferation of Theories is Good for the Mind. Philosophical Psychology 18 (6):715 – 735.
    A number of those that have advocated for theoretical pluralism in epistemology suggest that naturalistic arguments from cognitive science can support their case. Yet these theorists have traditionally faced two pressing needs. First, they have needed a cognitive science adequate to the task. Second, they have needed a bridge between whatever scientific account of cognition they favor and the normative claims of a pluralistic epistemology. Both of these challenges are addressed below in an argument for theoretical pluralism that brings together (...)
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  10. Christopher J. Preston (2005). Restoring Misplaced Epistemology. Ethics, Place and Environment 8 (3):373 – 384.
  11. Christopher J. Preston (2005). The Promise and Threat of Nanotechnology: Can Environmental Ethics Guide US? Hyle 11 (1):19 - 44.
    The growing presence of the products of nanotechnology in the public domain raises a number of ethical questions. This paper considers whether existing environmental ethics can provide some guidance on these questions. After a brief discussion of the appropriateness of an environmental ethics framework for the task at hand, the paper identifies a representative environmental ethic and uses it to evaluate four salient issues that emerge from nanotechnology. The discussion is intended both to give an initial theoretical take on nanotechnology (...)
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  12. Christopher J. Preston & Steven H. Corey (2005). Public Health and Environmentalism: Adding Garbarge to the History of Environmental Ethics. Environmental Ethics 27 (1):3-21.
    There exists in the United States a popular account of the historical roots of environmental philosophy which is worth noting not simply as a matter of historical interest, but also as a source book for some of the key ideas that lend shape to contemporary North American environmental philosophy. However, this folk wisdom about the historical beginnings of North American environmental thinking is incomplete. The wilderness-based history commonly used by environmental philosophers should be supplemented with the neglected story of garbage (...)
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  13. Christopher J. Preston (2002). Book Review: Linda McDowell. Gender, Place, and Identity: Understanding Feminist Geographies. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 1999. [REVIEW] Hypatia 17 (1):219-222.
  14. Christopher J. Preston (2002). Animality and Morality: Human Reason as an Animal Activity. Environmental Values 11 (4):427 - 442.
    Those in animal and environmental ethics wishing to extend moral considerability beyond the human community have at some point all had to counter the claim that it is reason that makes human distinct. Detailed arguments against the significance of reason have been rare due to the lack of any good empirical accounts of what reason actually is. Contemporary studies of the embodied mind are now able to fill this gap and show why reason is a poor choice for a criterion (...)
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  15. Christopher J. Preston (2002). Gender, Place, and Identity: Understanding Feminist Geographies (Review). Hypatia 17 (1):219-222.
  16. Christopher J. Preston (2001). Intrinsic Value and Care: Making Connections Through Ecological Narratives. Environmental Values 10 (2):243 - 263.
    Vitriolic debates between supporters of the intrinsic value and the care approaches to environmental ethics make it sound as though these two sides share no common ground. Yet ecofeminist Jim Cheney holds up Holmes Rolston's work as a paragon of feminist sensibility. I explore where Cheney gets this idea from and try to root out some potential connections between intrinsic value and care approaches. The common ground is explored through Alasdair Maclntyre's articulation of a narrative ethics and the development of (...)
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  17. Christopher J. Preston (2000). Conversing with Nature in a Postmodern Epistemological Framework. Environmental Ethics 22 (3):227-240.
    In a recent contribution to this journal, Jim Cheney argues for a postmodern epistemological framework that supports a conception of inquiry as a kind of “conversation” with nature. I examine how Cheney arrives at this metaphor and consider why it might be an appealing one for environmental philosophers. I note how, in the absence of an animistic account of nature, this metaphor turns out to be problematic. A closer examination of the postmodern insights that Cheney employs reveals that it is (...)
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  18. Christopher J. Preston (2000). Philosophy and Geography. Environmental Ethics 22 (2):215-218.
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  19. Christopher J. Preston (1998). Epistemology and Intrinsic Values: Norton and Callicott's Critiques of Rolston. Environmental Ethics 20 (4):409-428.
    Debates over the existence of intrinsic value have long been central to professional environmental ethics. Holmes Rolston, III’s version of intrinsic value is, perhaps, the most well known. Recently, powerful critiques leveled by Bryan G. Norton and J. Baird Callicott have suggested that there is an epistemological problem with Rolston’s account. In this paper, I argue first that the debates over intrinsic value are as pertinent now as they have ever been. I then explain the objections that Norton and Callicott (...)
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